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Biographical Record 



OF 



DEWITT COUNTY, 



ILLINOIS. 



ii^i^LjSTKA'rKi >. 



77/.' people that take no pride in the noble achievements of remote an, estors will never in liievi 
anything' worthy to he remembered with priJe by remote generations. ," — Mac vulay. 



CHICAGi i 

I in S. I. Ci akki Pi in ishing Company. 
1901 



r 






PREFACE. 



HE greatest of English historian*. MACAULAY, and one of the most 
brilliant writers of the present century, has said : "The history of a 
country is best told in a record of the lives of its people.'' In con- 
formity with thi> idea, the Biographical Record has been prepared. 
Instead of going to musty records, and taking therefrom dry statistical 
matter that can be appreciated by but few. our corps of writers have 
gone to the people, the men and women who have, by their enterprise 
and industry, brought this county to a rank second to none among 
those comprising this great and noble State, and from their lips have the story of their life 
struggles Xo more interesting or instructive matter could be pre-ented to an intelligent 
public. In this volume will be found a record of manv whose lives are worthy the imitation 
of coming generations. It tells how some, commencing life in povertv, by industry and 
economy have accumulated wealth. It tells how others, witli limited advantages for securing 
an education, have become learned men and women, with an influence extending throughout 
the length and breadth of the land. It tells of men who have ris L -n from the lower walks of 
life to eminence as statesmen, and whose names have become famous. It tells of those in 
every walk in life who have striven to succeed, and records how that success has usually 
crowned their efforts. It tells also of many, very manv. who. not seeking the applause of the 
world, have pursued the " even tenor of their way," content to have it said of them, as Christ 
said of the woman performing a deed of mercv — " Thev nave done what they could." It 
tells how many, in the pride and strength of young manhood, left the plow and the anvil, the 
lawyer's office and the counting-room, left every trade and profession, and at their country's 
call went forth valiantly " to do or die," and how through their efforts the Union was 
restored and peace once more reigned in the land. In the life of every man and ot every 
woman is a lesson that should not be lost upon those who follow after. 

Coming generations will appreciate this volume and preserve it as a sacred treasure, from 
the fact that it contains so much that would never rind its way into public records, and which 
would otherwise be inaccessible. Great care has been taken in the compilation of the work 
and everv opportunity possible given to those represented to insure correctness in what has 
been written : and the publishers tlatter themselves that thev give to their readers a work with 
few errors of consequence. In addition to biographical sketches, portraits of a number of 
representative citizens are given. 

The faces of some, and biographical sketches of many, will be missed in this volume. 
For this the publishers are not to blame. Xot having a proper conception of the work, some 
refused to give the information necessary to compile a sketch, while others were indifferent. 
Occasionally some member of the family would oppose the enterprise, and on account of such 
opposition the support of the interested one would be withheld. In a few instances men 
never could be found, though repeated calls were made at their residence or place of business. 

December, 1901. The S. T. Clarke Publishing Co. 



PART I. 



BIOGRAPHICAL INDEX. 



PAGE 

Adair. C. K 118 

Adkisson, Frank 351 

Allan, Andrew 58 

Allyn, Edward 14(1 

Amsden.C. F 313 

i, S. M 468 

Argo, William 201 

Armstrong, Joseph 308 

Armstrong, William 168 

Atchison, C. W 256 

ir, 1. N 252 

Baker. Isaac 260 

s, J. A. 312 

Barnett, \V. A 307 

Bayless, 1 P 260 

Beatty, H. G. 242 

Bell, David 36 

Bell, Henrv . 42 

Bell, [. E.. 46 

Bentley, E. B 378 

Bishop, C. W 100 

Black, Robert HO 

Blome, J. H A 287 

Blue, Uriah 420 

b, William 112 

Bowies, Hughes 'U7 

lord, Charles 170 

Breisford, William 124 

Brittin, Newton 228 

Brown, G. H 109 

Bryant, I. B 145 

Burton, Richard R -17 

Butterworth, John 317 

Byland, T.C 69 

Cacklev & Company 338 

Cackley, Jacob F... 142 , 

Cacklev, John G 114 

Cantrail, James I7"> 

Cardiff. W. 11 444 

Carter. S. K 365 

Cash. S.J 395 

Chapin. S. A .77 

Clearwaters, Reuben 101 



PAGE 

Clearwaters, Wesley 174 

Cuffman.J. W..... 112 

Cumming, R. V 132 

Cunningham, Francis 296 

Cunningham, I. M 121 

Curl, f. A ..." 416 

Danison, Edward 37'.' 

Davenport, Hugh 4o.", 

Davenport, Jeremiah 194 

Davis, A. 1 " 233 

Davis, J. K 7o 

Davis, Remus IriO 

1 >. Boise, Lafayette 340 

De Land, I. 1- ' 64 

Dietrich, Joseph 301 

Dix. J. F. 711 

Donahue, Hon. Michael 93 

Doqling, Rev. M. A 130 

1 'owning, C. D 278 

Edwards, Samuel A 30 

Ellington, Isaac 398 

Ellis, J.I 131 

Evans, /. W 

F'.wing, Thomas '.'4 

Ford, Peter 441 

Fosnaugh, I. A 295 

Foster, John W 287 

Fruit, E. W 146 

Fuller, John 122 

,G D 374 

Gideon, C. R. 275 

■.denning, Charles, Y. S. . . 387 

ly, I. K 239 

Graham, Capt. J. D 128 

Griffith, Harvey 378 

< Inner. G. W. 249 

Haldeman. [acob B 38 

Hallowan, Philip 4_>1 

Hamimll, J. \\ 324 

Harrison, E. G. F 234 



PAGE 

Harrold, F. I". 11:; 

Harrold, W. S 334 

Hart, fuhn -Just 

Hansock, W. II 369 

Helmick, Elihu 422 

Helmick, G.W 282 

Helmick, Nathaniel 304 

Hickman, Warren 

Hill, R. P 407 

Hirst. James 336 

Hoffman, I' rederick 311 

Holmes, S. E 462 

Hougham.J. \V -.'411 

I li useman. Isaac F _'l 

Hubbell, John F 152 

Huffman, A. W 273 

Huffman, G. F 100 

Huffman. S. G 471 

Hughes Brothers 43;i 

Hughes. William 134 

Hume, J. H 135 

Hunt, I'. E 377 

Hurd. Charles 181 

Hyde, G. W., M. D 136 

Ingham, Judged. K 18 

James, Criah 

Johnson, Mrs. Lydia M 

Johnson, N. P 310 

Johnston, W. W 

-. C\rus 261 

[ones, |ohn M 165 

5, J. Q. A 446 

-. I. W. and John B6 

-. Preston 4'i4 

Killough, |ohn 319 

Kirby, W. G UJ 

Kirk", I. M 173 

Rtrk.O. 1 60 

Kissack.John 314 

Lane, Alvis H 219 

Lane, Elbert D 59 



INDEX. 



Lane, Tillmon. 
Lane, \V. B.... 
LaTeer, J. D.. 
Lemon, R. A. . , 
Lighthall.G.L 



PAGE 

288 

,. 342 

. 225 

.. 46a 

. 469 



Myers, VV. H. 



Lisenby, J. A 4.">:t 

Litsinberger.G. A 429 

Long, William 251 

Maddox, J. T 29 

Maddox, T. M 326 

Magill, Henry It'. 

Magill, Henry A 54 

Magill, Robert 4:1 

Magill, Samuel 32 

Magill, William 23 

Marsh. Robert 161 

Martin, S. H :t70 

Mason, John' 143 

Mason, Truman 825 

Mav, Francis lid 

McCord, C. W 82 

McCord, I. H 329 

McCuddy. ( . II ISO 

\1. Farland, W. H 281 

McHenry, A. I) 4oi 

Mcintosh, E. E 177 

McKinney, A. T 396 

Mi Murry, \V. C 226 

M. Null. S. J 120 

Metzger. William 231 

Miller, Arthur F 66 

Miller, A. K HO 

M iller, Benjamin 52 

Miller, T. H 129 

Montgomery, A. II ^7 

Moody, C. E 145 

Moore, Arthur ;;::'> 

Moor.-. Blish 181 

Moore, «. lifton H 9 

Moore, (i. W 202 

Moon-, J. G 152 

Morrison, |. M 451 

Morrow. |. L 

Murphey, L.R 470 

Murphey, W. W 77 

Murray, W. M 47»; 

Myers, Samuel L39 



N'agelv, Aaron.. 
Nelson, P. P.... 
Newell, S. E. 
Newman, A. E. . 



PAGl 

. 134 

. 858 

433 

. 455 

. 184 



Parker, A. U 37t> 

Persinger, W. M 348 

Peters, A. M 108 

Phares, J. A 241 

Phares, W. M 166 

Pinkerton, F. E 820 

Porter, Dr. Edward ]o4 

Porter, f. G., M. I) 282 

Price, James H 

i hi. in, 1,1, Henry 119 

Randall. W. 11 254 

Ready, Capt. |. W 398 

Robb, Eli H..' 294 

Robii, [oseph .... '_'7i'. 

Rogers, W, o 316 

Ross, K. H 4<il 

Rudaville, G. 1) 397 

Rutledge, Mrs. Mary : |k 

Rutledge.W. | ' 181 

Rybolt, II. C, 417 

Sampson, W. M ,. 168 

Samuel, T, H 200 

Saveley, I II 265 

Schenck, David 68 

Scott, CM 2:.:; 

Scott, M. P 802 

Shepherd, F. C 283 

Shue. Austin .R Bl 

Shoe, |ohn 67 

Smith, G. W 108 

Smith, ( >rson J 183 

Snell, Col. Thomas . 156 

Spainhour, II. C 263 

Spell, ri, I liumas 10* 

Staymates, Byron F II 

Story, W. M 346 

Strange, James P '24 

Summerville, John 7- 



PAGE 

Swan, Malco'm 41!» 

Swigart, Carl 420 

Swigart, Mrs. Catherine 65 

Swigart, E. C ::7.", 

Swisher, I. F 472 

Taylor, W. II 285 

Taylor, W. M 259 

Thomas, Isaac W US 

Thorp, James W 1 ."> 

Thorpe, W. H 57 

Thurber, Isaac C 176 

Trenkle, Mrs. Caroline 213 

Tuggle, |ohn 169 

Turner, A. A 288 

Turner. Dennis 360 

Turner, William T 44 

Tyler, A. [., Ml) 195 

1 v In, John 1L, M. I) 189 



Vance, Mrs. Franklin. 



875 



Wagner, H. J 271 

WaJden, Maris 215 

u aiker, Charles 87 

Walker, Judge Robert 148 

Warner, Hon, John 26 

\\ eedman, 1 reoi ge 3. r >4 

\\ ee.lnian. Mrs. Mary J l. r >K 

w eld, William .'. i. r .4 

Wetzel I, George 3ii7 

Whitehead, I. II 888 

Whitehead, [. Q 217 

Wightwick, John 210 

W illiams, \lbert C. 228 

Williams, S. D 868 

Williams, W. C HMO 

Willson, P. K 356 

Wilson, Andrew 244 

Wilson. Mrs. Martha 196 

Wilson Peter 220 

Wolf. Philip 440 

« 

Young, Mrs. Mary A 198 

Ziegler, lacob 13 

Zorger.C. K 864 




° CONTENTS 



'..V'/.-- 




INDEX TO FART II. 



Compendium of National Biography. 



Biographical Sketches of National Celebrities. 



PAGE 

Abbott, Lyman 144 

Adams, Charles Kendall 143 

Adams, John 25 

Adams, John (juincy 61 

Agassiz, Louis J. R 137 

A Ig-er, Russell A 173 

Allison, William B 131 

Allston, Washington 190 

Atgeld, John Pefer 1 4' » 

Andrews, Elisha B 184 

Anthony, Susan B 62 

Armour, Philip D 62 

Arnold, Benedict 9 1 

Arthur, Chester Allen 168 

Astor, John Jacob 139 

Audobon, John Jacob 166 

Bailey, James Montgomery... 177 

Bancroft, George T4 

Barnard, Frederick A. P 179 

Barnum, Phineas T 41 

Barrett, Lawrence 1 56 

Barton, Clara 209 

Bayard, Thomas Francis 200 

Beard, William H 196 

Beauregard, Pierre G. T 203 

Bt-i-c her. Henry Ward 26 

Bell, Alexander Graham 96 

Bennett, James Gordon 206 

Benton, Thomas Hart ■>'■'• 

Bergh. Henry 160 

-tadt, Albert 191 

Billings, Josh 166 

Blaine, James Gillespie 2*2 

Bland, Richard Parks 196 



PAGE 

Boone, Daniel 36 

Booth, Edwin "'1 

Booth, Junius Brutus 177 

Brice, Calvin S 1-1 

Bmoks, Philips 130 

Brown, John 51 

Bmwn, Charles Farrar 91 

Brush, Charles Francis 133 

Bryan, William Jennings 158 

Bryant, William Cullen 44 

Buchanan, Franklin 195 

Buchanan, James 128 

Buckner, Simon Boliver 188 

Buniette, Robert J 103 

Burr. Aaron Ill 

Butler, Benjamin Franklin.... 24 

Calhoun, John Caldwell 23 

Cameron, James Donald 141 

Cameron, Simon 141 

Cammack, Addison li'7 

Campbell. Alexander 180 

Carlisle, John G 133 

Carnegie, Andrew 73 

Carpenter, Matthew Hale 173 

Carson, Christopher (Kit). ... 36 

Cass, Lewis 110 

Chase, Salmon Portland 65 

Childs, George W 

Cboate, Kufus 207 

Chaflin, Horace Brigham 107 

Clay. Henry 21 

Clemens, Samuel Langhorne. 88 

Cleveland, Grover 174 

Clews, Henry 153 



PAGE 

Clinton, DeWitt 110 

Colfax, Schuyler 13!* 

Conkling, Altred 32 

Conkling, Roscoe 82 

Cooley, Thomas Mclntyre... 14" 

Cooper, James Fenimore 58 

Cooper, Peter 37 

Copely, John Singleton 191 

Corbin. Austin 205 

Corcoran, W. W 196 

Cornell, Ezra 161 

Cramp, William I s '' 

Crockett, David 76 

Cullom, Shelby Moore 116 

Curtis, George William 144 

Cushman, Charlotte 107 

Custer, George A 95 

Dana. Charles A B8 

"Danbury News Man" 177 

Davenport, Fanny 106 

Da\ is, lefferson 24 

I )ebs. Eugene V 132 

Decatur, Stephen 1"! 

Deering, William 198 

Depew, ihauncey Mitchell... 209 

Dickinson, Anna 108 

Dickinson, Hon M 139 

1 tingle) . N< *<■!). Jr '21'. 

I loooell) . Ignatius 161 

Douglas, Stephen Arnold. . . . 

Douglass, Frederick 4:: 

Dow.Neal 108 

Draper, John William 1-4 



TABLE OF CONTENTS— PART 1 1 



PAGE 

Drexel, Anthony Joseph 124 

Dupont, Henry 198 

Edison, Thomas Alva 55 

Edmunds, George F 201 

Ellsworth, Oliver 168 

Emerson, Ralph Waldo 57 

Ericsson, John 127 

Evarts, William Maxwell v '-' 

Farragut, David Glascoe 80 

Field, Cyrus West 178 

Field, David Dudley L26 

Field, Marshall 59 

Field, Stephen Johnson 216 

Fillmore. Millard 118 

Foote, Andrew Hull 176 

I oraker, Joseph B 1 1" 

Forrest, Edwin 92 

i rank lin, Benjamin 18 

I- remont, fohn Chai les '-"■' 

Fuller, Melville Weston 168 

Fulton, Robert 

, I.\ man J 71 

Gallatin, Albert 11'-' 

Garfield, lames A 163 

Garn ii, [ohn Work 200 

( ;,u i ison, William Lloyd 50 

Cat. s, Horatio ' 10 

Galling, Rii hard [ordan 116 

[enry 203 

< iibl S, l animal James 209 

Gilmon . Tain, k Sarsfield 77 

( iirard, Stephen 187 

b, John H 181 

i .1. jay ■'- 

Gordon, John B 215 

( .lam. i 1} sses S 155 

Gray, Asa 

Gray, Elisha 149 

ley, Adolphus W 142 

Greeley, Horace 20 

Greene, Nathaniel 69 

Gresham, Walter Quintin 183 

Hale, Edward Everett 79 

Hall, Charles Francis 167 

Hamilton, Alexander SI 

Hamlin, Hannibal 214 

Hampton, Wade 192 

Hancock, Winfield Scott 146 

Hanna, Marcus Alonzo 169 

Harris, Isham G 214 

Harrison, William Henry C 

Harrison, Benjamin 182 

Harvard, John 129 

Havemeyer, John Craig 182 

Hawrhorne, Nathaniel 185 

Hayes, Rutherford Birchard.. . 157 
Hendricks, Thomas Andrew. . 212 

Henry, Joseph 105 

Henrv,» Patrick 83 

Hill, David Bennett 90 

Hobart, Garrett A 213 

Holmes, Oliver Wendell 206 

Hooker, Joseph 52 

Howe, Elias ISO 

Howells, William Dean 104 



PAGE 

Houston, Sam 120 

Hughes, Archbishop John 157 

Hughitt, Marvin 159 

Hull, Isaac 169 

Huntington, Collis Totter 94 

Ingalls, John James 114 

[ngersoll, Robert G 85 

Irving, Washington 33 

Jackson, Andrew 71 

Jackson, " Stonewall " 67 

Jackson, Thomas Jonathan 67 

jay, John 89 

Jefferson, Joseph 47 

I - it • rson, Thomas 34 

[obnson, Andrew 145 

Johnson, Eastman 202 

Johnston, [oseph Ei cleston... . 85 

[ones, James K . 171 

i, [ohn Paul ! '7 
ones, Samuel Porter 115 

Kane, Elisha Kent 125 

Kearney, Philip 210 

Kenton, Simon I -• 

Knox. John Jay 184 

Lamar, Lucius Q. C 201 

Landon, Melville 1> 109 

Lee, Robert Edward 

Lewis, Charles B 193 

Lincoln, Abraham 185 

Livermore, Mar) Ashton Til 

I ... ke, I >a\ nl Ross 172 

in, John A 26 

i. II, .w, lleiu\ Wads worth 87 

I i, James 56 

Lowell, lames Russell lot 

Mackay, [ohn William 148 

Madison, lames 42 

Marshall. John 1"'''. 

Mather. Cotton 164 

Mather, lm n ase 168 

Maxim, Hiram S 194 

Mil Ii Han, Georgi Brinton.. . . 47 

Mc( oi mil k, < vrus Hall 172 

Mel tonough, ( I nomas.. . 167 

McKinley, w illiam 217 

Meade, ( ieorge '■ iordon 75 

Medill, Joseph 159 

Miles. Nelson A 17 ,; 

Miller, Cincinnatus Heine 218 

Miller, loaijuin 218 

Mills, Roger Queries 211 

Monroe, lames 54 

Moody, Dwight L 207 

Moran, Thomas 98 

Morgan, John Pierpont 208 

Morgan, John T 216 

Morris, Robert 165 

Morse, Samuel F. B 124 

Morton, Levi P 142 

Mortpn, Oliver Perry 215 

Motley, John Lathrop . . 130 

"Nye, Bill" 59 

Nye, Edgar Wilson 59 



PAGE 

O'Conor, Charles 1 *7 

( ilney, Richard 138 

Paine, Thomas 147 

Palmer, |ohn M 195 

I'm khurst, Charles Henry 160 

'■ Partington, Mrs." 202 

Peabody, < ieorge 17ti 

Peek, George W IOT 

ivitr. , William A 164 

Perkins, Eli 109 

Perry, Oliver Hazard !»7 

Phillips, Wendell 80 

Pierce, Franklin 122 

Pmgiee, ii,,. ten S 212 

Plant, lb ins Ii 192 

Poe, Edgar Allen 69 

Polk, James Knox 102 

1 orter, I (avid 1 (ixon 68 

Ton. r, Noah 93 

Prentii e, Geoi ge i lenison, . , 119 

Presi .'it, William Ilicklmg. . .. 96 

Pullman, Geoi ge Mortimer. .. 121 

I, M 198 

Matthew S 171 

Randi ,1 ph 1 dmund 186 

Read, Thomas Buchanan 132 

Ree.i. Thomas Bra< kett 208 

Rei.l. Whitelaw 149 

Roai h. John 190 

Rockefeller, John Davison..., 195 

Root, ( Jeoi ge I rederick 

Rothermel, Peter T 118 

Rutledj . , [ohn 57 

21 1 

ifield, John McAllister 199 

Si Iiui :, Carl 201 

Si ott, Thomas Alexander 204 

Si ott, Winfield 79 

Seward, William Henry .... 44 

Sharon, William 165 

Shaw. Henry W 166 

Sheridan, Phillip Henry 40 

Sherman, I bai l( - K 87 

Sherman, [ohn 86 

Shillaber, Benjamin Penhallow 202 

Sherman, William Tecumseh.. 80 

Smith, Edmund Kirby 114 

S.nisa, [ohn Philip 60 

Spreckels, Clans 159 

Stanford, Leland 101 

Stanton. Edwin McMasters... 17'.l 

Stanton, Elizabeth Cady 126 

Stephens, Alexander Hamilton 32 

Stepheiison.Aill.il Ewing... . 141 

Stewart, Alexander T 58 

Stewart, William Morris 213 

Stowe, Harriet Elizabeth 

Beecher 66 

Stuart, James E. B 122 

Sumner, Charles 34 

Talmage, Thomas DeWitt . . 60 

Taney," Roger Broo'.~ 129 

Taylor, Zachary 108 

Teller, Henry M 127 



TABLE OF CONTENTS— PART J 1 



i \. i 

a, Nikola 193 

Thomas, George H ','■'• 

Thomas, Theodore 172 

Thurman, Allen G 90 

Thurston, John M 166 

Tilden, Samuel J '<■ 

Tillman, Benjamin Ryan 11;* 

Toombs, Robert 

" Twain, Mark " 

. John 98 

Van Buren, Manin ". ■ 

Yanderhilt, Cornelius 35 

Vail.Alfred 154 

Vest, < ieorgc Graham 214 



PAGE 

Vilas, William Freeman 140 

Voorhees, Daniel Wolsey 95 

\\ .iitc, Morrison Remich 125 

Wallace, Lewis 199 

Wall.uk, Lester 121 

Wall. iik. John Lester 121 

Wanamaker, Mm 89 

Ward, "Artemus" '.'1 

Washburne, Elihu Benjamin. . 189 

U ashington, George 17 

Watson, Thomas E 178 

Watterson, Henry 76 

Weaver, lames H 123 

Webster, Daniel 19 



PAGl 

Webster, Noah 

Weed, Thurlow 91 

West, Benjamin 1 1 r. 

Whipple, Henry Benjamin. . . . 161 

White, Stephen V 162 

Whitefield, ('■(-..rye 150 

Whitman, Walt r.'T 

Whitney, Eli 120 

Whitney, William Collins 92 

Whittier, John Greenleaf 67 

Willard, Frances E 133 

Wilson, William L 

Winchell, Alexander 17 

Wmdom, William 138 



PORTRAITS OF NATIONAL CELEBRITIES. 



PAGE 

Alger, Russell A. in 

son, William B 99 

Anthony, Susan B 

Armour, Philip D 151 

Arthur. Chester A 81 

Barnum, Phineas T 117 

her, Henry Ward 27 

Blaine, lames G 151 

Booth, Edwin 63 

Bryan, Wm. J 63 

Bryant, William Cullen 

Buchanan, James 81 

Buckner, Simon B 16 

Butler Benjamin F 151 

Carlisle. John G 151 

Chase, Salmon P 16 

Chi) W 99 

Clay. Henry 81 

Cleveland, Grover 45 

Cooper, Peter 99 

Dana, Charles A 151 

Depew, Chauncey M 117 

Douglass, Fred 

Emerson, Ralph Waldo 27 

Evarts. William M 99 

Farragut, Com. D. G 185 

Field, Cyrus W 63 



PAGE 

Field. Marshall 117 

Franklin, Benjamin 63 

Fremont, Gen. John C 16 

Gage, Lyman J 151 

eld, lames A 45 

Garrison, William Lloyd 63 

t ieorge, Henry 117 

Could, [ay. 99 

Grant, Gen. I. S 185 

Greeley, Horace - 1 

Hampton, Wade 16 

Hancock, Gen. Winfield S 

Hanna, Mark A 117 

Harrison. Benjamin 81 

Hayes, R. B 45 

Hendricks, Thomas A 81 

Holmes, Oliver W 151 

Hooker, Gen. Joseph 16 

I ngersoil, Robert G 117 

I rving, Washington J7 

Jackson, Andrew 4". 

Jefferson, Thomas 45 
ohnston. Gen. J. E 16 

Lee, Gen. Robert E 185 

Lincoln, Abraham 81 

Logan, Gen. John A 16 

Longfellow, Henry W 185 



PAGE 

Longstrc-t, Gen. James 16 

Lowell. James Russell 27 

McKinley, William L"> 

Morse. S. F. B 

Phillips, Wendell 27 

Porter, Com. D. D 185 

Pullman, George M 117 

Quay, M. S 

Reed, Thomas B 151 

Sage, Russell 117 

, Gen. Winfield 185 

Seward, William H 45 

Sherman, John 99 

Sherman, Gen. W. T 151 

Stanton, Elizabeth Cady J7 

Stowe. Harriet Beecher -J 7 

Sumner, Charles 45 

Talmage, T. DeWitt 63 

Teller. Henry M 

Thurman, Allen G 81 

Tilden, Samuel J 117 

Van Buren, Martin 81 

Yanderbilt, Commodore 99 

Webster, Daniel 27 

Whittier, John G 21 

Washington, George A 5 

Watterson, Henrv. 63 




I 






BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD 



CLIFTON II. MOORE. 

In one of his most eloquent orations 

Charles Sumner said "peace hath her vic- 
tories no less renowned than war." It was 
the victories of peace which were won by 
Clifton 11. Mi ii>re. a man distinguished for 
his remarkable husiness ability ami sagacity, 
however, through the channels of legitimate 
business transactions, in which he gained 
wealth ami at the same time commanded in 
unusual degree the confidence and respect of 
his fellow men. During a long and suc- 
cessful business career, characterized by en- 
terprise, he ever maintained an enviable 
reputation for the highest honor and prin- 
ciple, and no unworthy dee<l or word ever 
linked itself with his name, ami no citizen of 
Illinois made better or more unostentatious 
use of his accumulations. He is entitled to 
high place of honor among the representa- 
tive men of this section of the state, for at 
all times his life was manly, his actions sin- 
cere, his honesty unquestioned. 

Mr. Moore was born m Kirklaml. Lake 
county, Ohio, October jo. [817, the eldest 
son of Isaac and Philena (Blish) Moore, 
whose family numbered eight -mis. His 
father was born at the old family homestead 
in Saratoga county. New York, January 31, 
J 704. and was of English lineage. The 



grandfather. John Moore, according to the 
family tradition, was one of a large number 
of sons and daughters, and when only about 
six years old was left an orphan, the family 
at that time residing near the boundary line 
between Maryland and Delaware. He was 
reared by an uncle of the name of Hyde un- 
til sixteen years of age. when he entered 
military service, and tor about ten years was 
largely engaged in lighting Indians. He en- 
listed for service in the Revolutionary war 
when the yoke of British oppression had be- 
come intolerable and the colonists had re- 
solved to sever all allegiance with the mother 
country, and served throughout the entire- 
contest. He was at Fort Stanwux when it 
was beseiged by St. Leger with his British 
and Indian troops, and was with General 
Washington at Yorktown at the time Corn- 
wallis surrendered, which surrender virtu- 
ally ended the war. Returning to his home, 
he found that his brothers had all removed. 
either to Virginia or Kentucky. John 
Moore was a man of tine physique and of 
great powers of endurance, and was thus 
well equipped to meet the hardships of pio- 
neer life. He reached the ripe "1.1 age of 
ninety-five years, and was laid to his final 
rest in ( ieatiga county, ( >hiO. 

Uaac Moore, his son, the father of our 
subject, became a very successful busim 



10 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



man. although little qualified by educational 
privileges. His natural ability, however, 
was very great, and as the years advanced 
he became a prosperous farmer. In i8n he 
removed to Kirkland, < mio, in company v\ ith 
his parents, an unmarried sister and three 
married sisters and their husbands There 
amid the scenes of pioneer life he estab- 
lished his home and accumulated a comfort- 
able ci unpetence. I te passed his last days in 
the In >me of his son Clifton, in DeWitl coun- 
ty, Illinois, dying on the 9th of October, 
1882, when almost ninety years of age. lie 
had be« n three times married. His first wife 
was the mother of our subject, and they bad 
eight children. Mrs. Moore was a native oi 
Massachusetts and a daughter of Benjamin 
and Phebe (Skinner) Blish, who were 
Welsh descent, the ancestrj of the family 
being traced back to Abraham Blish, a na- 
if Wales, who came to America in 1637. 
Mrs. Moore was born in [796, and departed 
this life Max 1 (., 1832. 

Under the parental roof Clifton 11. 
M01 e spent his childhood days, and in the 
district sch< n 1- near his hi me began hi-- edu- 
cation, which was later supplemented by a 
course of study pursued under the direction 
a prominent clergyman of Bedford, Ohio. 
lie later became a student in Paynesville, 
< )hio, and in the \\ estern Reserve Teachers' 
Seminary at Kirkland. Well equipped with 
a liberal education, he then started out in 
life, determined to make the most of his 
opportunities and to gain success, lie en- 
gaged in teaching in Geauga and Cuyahoga 
counties. Ohio, and then determined to try 
his fortune in a more western district. In 
the spring of 1839 he followed the star of 
empire on its westward way. arriving at 
Pekin. Illinois, with a cash capital of less 
than five dollars. But this counted littli to 
the young man of resolute spirit, possessed 



of health and energy. lie soon secured a 
school, and while engaged in teaching spent 
his time outside of the schoolroom in read- 
ing law with the firm of Bail) & Wilmot, 
being admitted ti 1 the bar in [84 1 . 

In August of the same year Mr. Moore 
arrived in Clinton, being the first lawyer to 
establish an office here, and through many 
years he maintained his place as the first 
lawyer of the city, not only by reason oi his 
seniority in years of practice hut also on ac- 
count of his skill as a practitioner and his 
abilit) as a counsellor, llis knowledge of 
law was comprehensive and exact, and it 
soon became known that his devotion to his 
clients' interest was proverbial and that he 
prepared his cases with the greatest care and 
precision. He won his first suit and after- 
ward many others of much importance, even 
though he met in forensic combat such dis- 
tinguished lawyers as Abraham Lincoln, 
Judge David Davis and others. The only 
office which he ever filled was also on the 
line of his professii m. ha\ ing in 1 871 1 served 
as a member of the constitutional conven- 
tion of the state, m which body he left the 

impress "i his strong mind and profound 
al knowledge upon the organic law of 
the ci mmi nwcalth. 

At an earlj day Mr. Moore also began 
investing in land, and in this was long .asso- 
ciated with fudge David Davis, they to- 
gether owning at one lime thirty thousand 
acres. His investments were at first small, 
hut proving profitable, he wisely again in- 
vested the monej thus gained in other land, 
and in due course of time he won wealth 
that classed him among the millionaires of 
the state. Ilis business judgment was 
rarely, if ever, at fault, and his savings were 
so judiciously placed that he never failed to 
realize on an investment. 1 le was exceed- 
ingly considerate of his tenants, and never 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



1 1 



asked of them more than one-third of the 
cmp. or three dollars and a half per acre. 
So long as they proved themselves honest 
and industrious they were never asked to 
give p — essions, and some "t" them remained 
Upon his farms for from ten to twenty years 
or more. At his death one of them, who 
had occupied a farm for twenty-two ye 

i: "1 have lost the best friend 1 ever 
had." What higher tribute of praise could 
be given? 

While deeply engrossed with his busi- 
ness cares, he was in his home an ideal hus- 
band and father, kind, considerate and lov- 
ing, and lie erected for his family one of the 
finest residences in this section <•{ the state. 
It stands in the midst of a most attractive 
lawn adorned with walks, drives, shade trees 
and flowers, and one of its most attractive 
features is the library which fills two ro ms 
and ;s one of the finest collections of books 
in any home in the entire -tate. It contains 
many rare and interesting - old volumes 
well as the mi ire standard wi «ks. The 1 

i for the mind was all that found its way 
there, and he had every reason to be proud 
of his splendid collection of -books, the con- 
tents of which were very familiar to him. 
He was a man of scholarly attainments and 

E irded his books as among his b 
friends. 

Mr. M< ore first married Mi-s Elizabeth 
Richmond, the wedding taking place Aug- 
ust 14. [845. The lady was a native of 

indaigua, New York, and a daughter of 
Hiram Richmond, later of Tremont, Taze- 
well county. Illinois. Four children were 
born unto them but only one i- now living. 
Arthur, who is extensively engaged in farm- 
ing. Mrs. M,,ore died May 30, 1872, and 
on the 26th of July. 1X74. Mr. Moore wed- 
ded Miss Rose Onstein, a native of North 
Amherst, Ohio, and a daughter of George 



ami Rosanna 1 Ruble) Onstein, the former 
of German de-cent and the latter of Scotch 
and German lineage. The father was born 
in Pennsylvania, became a fanner of Lor- 
aine county. Ohio, and died in hi- seventieth 
year, while his wife, also a native of the 
Keystone -tate. passed away at the age of 

enty-five. They were the parents of 
eight children. Mr. Moore was called to 
his final reward April 29, [901, after a brief 
illness of only five days. 

In his political views Mr. Moore was 
always a Republican, and could undoubtedly 
have won high political honors had he cared 
for such advancement, but he preferred to 
dev< ite his time and attentii in t> 1 his law prac- 
tice and his property interests. He was 1 
member ^-r DeWitt Lodge, No. Si. F. & 
A. M.. and his life was in harmony with the 
principles of the craft which recognized the 
brotherhood of mankind. He recognized 
his duty to his fellow men and was chari- 
table, generous and sympathetic. He con- 
tributed with free hand to the upbuilding of 
churches and schools and was a ready as- 
sistant to all measures which he believed 
would promote the welfare of hi- adopted 
county. In manner he was dignified and 
quiet, but his friendship was sincere and un- 
changing, and everywhere he was -p< ken of 
in terms of the highest respect and esteem. 
Fearless in conduct, honorable in action and 
stainless in reputation, the life 1 f this man 
wa- -i beneficent influence in DeWitt county, 
and his example is one well worthy of emu- 
late 'ii. 



BYRON F. STAYM.V: 

Professor 1'.. 1". Staymates i- one of the 
influential citizen- of Clinton, a conspicu- 
ous figure in the business, literary and so- 
cial life of the city, exerting a strong in- 



12 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



fluence in support of all progressive meas- 
ures for the public good. A man of splendid 
intellectual endowment, broad minded and 
viewing with comprehensive glance the needs 
of the community, he advocates all that tends 
to the general welfare and is accounted one 
of the valued residents of Clinton. As an 
earnest advocate of the Illinois Fireman's 
Association he has established a reputation 
that is not confined to the limits of the state, 
but as the statistician of thai organization 
he has established an acquaintance, not only 
throughout the United States, but his name 

is well known in many ol the cities oi Eu- 
1 i ipe 

Professor Byron F. Staymates is a na- 
tive of the Buckeye state, his birth ba\ ing oc 
curred in Huntsville, October i. [852, and 
is a son of Hiram I.. Staymates. who settled 

in Texas township. DeWitl county, in 1856. 
One year later he removed to (reek town- 
ship, where he purchased one hundred and 
eighty acres of land known as the /imnni 
man farm, on which he continued to reside 
until [882. This farm he has greatly im- 
proved and placed under a high state of cul- 
tivation, lie also owns considerable prop- 
erty in Barnett township. Since [882 he 
has been a resident of Clinton, where he now 
lues retired from active labor. His success 
in life is due entirelj to his own efforts, as he 
had nothing to start on and that which he 
has accumulated has been hv his own hard 
labor, and he is to-day accounted one of the 
substantial men of the county. llis birth 
occurred in Licking count). Ohio, where lie 
was born on the 3d clay of October, [819, 
a son of Peter Staymates. who was a son of 
Phillip, who emigrated to this country prior 
to the Revolutionary war. in which he took 
a prominent part, being a major in the Amer- 
ican army. After the close of this memor- 
able war he received a errant of land near 



Pittsburg, Pennsylvania. In 1808 he was 
called to his final rest at the age of eighty- 
seven vcais. and his remains are interred at 
Greensburg, that state, where he passed his 

last days. 

The Slav mates family is of German ori- 
gin, the name formerly being spelled Stein- 
met/, and Phillip was the first to locate in 
this country. I lis descendants later settled in 
Ohio, where they became early settlers and 
where most of them died. 

The marriage of Hiram P. Staymates, 

our subject's father, with .Miss Charlotte 
Westbrook, who was also a native of Ohio, 
resulted in the birth of two children, name- 
ly: Byron F. and Elmer, who is now de- 
ceased. Mrs. Staymates died at the age of 

sixt) four years. 

\s before stated, our subject was born 
in Ohio, where he resided until he was four 
years of age, when he was brought to this 
county by his parents, lie received a good 
common school education in the Creek town- 
ship schools, after which he engaged in 
teaching for a short time. In [865 he en- 
tered the Wesleyan University at Blooming- 
ton, where he was graduated six years later 
as Bachelor and later as Master of Arts. I le 
then took up the study of law in the Wes- 
leyan Paw School and later was a professor 
in an academy at Smith's Grove, Kentucky, 
which position he held for one year. At the 
expiration of this period he took up his resi- 
dence in Vicksburg, Mississippi, where he 
was admitted to the bar. but soon after he 
was compelled to leave the city, owing to 
the yellow fever scourge. We next find him 
located in Texas for a short time and from 
there he went to the republic of Mexico, but 
owing to a serious failing of the eyesight he 
was compelled to return home and abandon 
all professional work for a number of years. 
In iSSii be tilled the position of assistant 



THE RI( (GRAPHICAL RECORD. 



'3 



editor of the Greensburg, Pennsylvania, 
Record, and during the Black and Beaver 
campaign of that year he became actively 
identified with the political interests of the 
state as a speaker and writer of more than 
ordinary ability. It might be well to men- 
tion here that since 187(1 he has spoken and 
upheld the principles of the Democratic party 
in every campaign. Going extensively 
through the state at the demands of the man- 
rig committees. 

In [889 he took an active part in the 
formation of the Illinois Firemen's Associa- 
tion, and has held the office of statistician 
since it- organization. In this work Mr. 
Staymates has taken more than an ordinary 
interest, and his work along this line de- 
mands more than a mere mention. In Jan- 
nary. iSSS. the Illinois Fireman's Associa- 
tion was formed in the city of Clinton and 
at its tenth annual convention, which was 
held in Clinton January [3, [899, Mr. Stay- 
mates read a paper in which he reviewed the 
work of the organization since its forma- 
tion. In detail he showed how it hail grown 
from a weak association of only a few mem- 
bers to one of the Strongest and largest in 
this country. He reviewed its work, it- 
meetings during the past ten years, and in 
clo-ing his remarks said: "This is hut an 
imperfect narrative of the first decade of the 
Illinois Fireman's Association. One of the 
results has been the early complete organiza- 
tion of the tire service of Illinois; another to 
raise its proficiency ami efficiency in the 
noble work of wealth saving to a laudable 
free. What the first association has saved 
Illinois the uncounted millions have not yet 
been shown. Of the grant ten years we can 
say Finis coronal opus." 

When the National Fireman's Associa- 
tion was formed in [897, Mr. Staymates was 
by the representatives of twelve state a- 



ciations chosen secretary and later was elect- 
ed corresponding secretary and in [900 rep- 
resented both the Illinois and National holl- 
ies at the great Parisian World's Congi 
oi Fire Engineers, spending several mouths 
in Europe, and . .11 his return he read an elab- 
orate report before the convention in this 
Country. In his report he showed his ability 
a- an observer and his paper abounded in 
observations of the European system of tire 
lighting. 

In 1893, at the World's Columbian Ex- 
position, he was chosen by the Illinois Board 
of Commissioners as a superintendent of 
the natural history exhibit and also lectured 
on the subjects of fish, forestry and s, ,ils, 
all of which has engaged his attention for 
many years. Since then he has lectured at 
many farmers' institutes in central Illinois, 
and has also gained a wide reputation as a 
contributor to the daily papers. 

Mr. Staymates has also made a close 
study of languages and is a proficient talker 
in German, Spanish and French. During 
the convention of the Pan-American Con- 
vention of Firemen, which was held at the 
Pan-American Exposition in [901, he served 
as chairman of the program committee, 
which position he tilled with much credit. 

Space will not permit us to go into fur- 
ther detail, hut such in brief outline is the 
personal history of our subject. lie has 
gained an enviable reputation and no bi- 
ography of the leading men of DeWitl coun- 
ty would he complete without mention of 
Professor I'.. F. Staymates. 



JACOB ZIEGLER. 



No foreign element has become a more 
important part in our American citizenship 
than that furnished by Germany. The em- 



14 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



igrants from that land have brought with 
them to the New World the stability, enter- 
prise and perseverance characteristic of their 
people and have fused these qualities with 
the progressiveness and indomitable spirit of 
the \\ est. Mr. Ziegler, m >\v i me of the prom- 
inent farmers of DeWitt county, is a worthy 
representative of this class. 

The subject of this review was hern in 
the province of I'ermanse, Bavaria, Ger 
many, November 14. 1K44, a son of Jacob 
and Louisa (Gebhart) Ziegler, both natives 
of the same province as himself. In [852 
Jacob Ziegler. with his wife and family, set 
sail from Havre, France, in a French sailing 
vessel, which consumed forty-two days be 
tween that port and Xew York City. Land 
ing at Castle Garden, the family went im- 
mediately to Brown county, < mio, where the 
father purchased a farm of one hundred 
acres and engaged in its operation for five 
years. At the end of thai time he sold out 
and removed to McLean county. Illinois. 
locating in Normal township, where he pur- 
chased one hundred and sixty acres of laud. 
1 le engaged in operating this farm for many 
years and died there after reaching the ripe 
old age of ninety-eight years. I lis wife had 
preceded him some years before, being 
eighty-six years of age at the time of her 
death. 

To Jacob Ziegler, Sr., and wife were 
horn eighteen children, of whom nine arc- 
still living, as follows: Maria is the wife 
of F. 1 '. Bohrer and resides in Bloomington, 
Illinois: Louisa is the widow of Peter Kline 
and makes her home in Farmer City, Illi- 
nois; Louis has been a merchant of Spokane. 
Washington, for many years; Kate married 
Louis llaney and they reside in Springfield, 
Illinois; Jacob, our subject, is next in order 
of hirth ; Sophia is the wife of Herman 
) lazenw inkle, a business man of Storm 



Lake, Iowa; Fredericka, widow of Henry 
Kunsch, is a resident of Des Moines, Iowa; 
Charles is a farmer of Pocahontas county, 
Iowa; and Eva, the youngest living child, is 
the wife of Louis Lowentrout, who is en- 
gaged in business in I Woo:.iington, Illinois. 

Our subject received his primary educa- 
tion in the schools of Germany, and after 
coming to America attended the district 
schools of Brown county, Ohii for a short 
tune, mil as Ins lather was in limited cir- 
cumstances and there were many mouths to 
feed, his education has been principally re- 
ceived through reading and observation in 
later years. Lip to the time he was twenty- 
six years of age, Jacob Ziegler remained at 
home, giving his labor and time to his fa- 
ther. In the spring of [870, having seen his 
father comfortably located upon his own 
farm in Normal township, our subject made 
arrangements with Judge David Davis, of 
Bloomington, to rent one . if his farms in I >e- 
W'itt county, consisting of eighteen hundred 
acres of land. With hut two hundred dol- 
lars in capital, he commenced his life labors 
and for eleven years he gave his time and 
attention to farming ami stock raising on a 
large scale. After meeting with good suc- 
cess for a few years, cholera got among his 
hogs, ami out of a herd of eighl hundred, 
six hundred SUCCUmbed to tin- disease. Noth- 
ing daunted by his ill fortune. Mr. Ziegler 
began anew, and in the fall of [88] pur- 
chased three hundred and twenty acres of 
land on section I. 'Texas township, which 
was under cultivation, but not improved. 
This farm Mr. Ziegler has converted into 
one "I the most desirable places in the coun- 
ty, erecting a beautiful country home at a 
cost of seven thousand dollars, which is sup- 
plied with all modern conveniences. 

On the 20th of December. 1877. Mt. 
Ziegler was united in marriage with Miss 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



15 



Annie Elizabeth Simpson, a native of -Mi- 
ami county. Ohio, and a daughter of Henry 

and Annie (Hartsock) Simpson, also na- 
tives of < >hio, who came to Illinois in 1855. 
Mr. Simpson died at the age of seventy-four 
years, while his wife was one year younger 

at the time of her death. Mrs. Ziegler was 
the youngest "t three children horn to her 
parents. 

Two children have heen born to Mr. and 
Mrs. Ziegler: Wilfred I., horn October jo. 
1878, is a graduate of the Springfield Busi- 
ness College, hut is now attending the State 
University at Champaign. Illinois; Jacob 
Frank, horn February 25, [882, is attending 
the high school in Clinton. Illinois. 

Mr. Ziegler gives his attention almost ex- 
clusively to stock farming, raising and feed- 
ing cattle, hogs and sheep for the market, 
preferring to sell his grain on the hoof. 1 [e 
has ever heen an advocate of all measures 
calculated to advance the moral or material 
welfare of his adopted county. He was 
chairman of several important committees 
and general manager of the Chautauqua As- 
sociation of Clinton for [901, and was in- 
strumental in promoting the organization of 
the same. He was also one of the promoters 
of the VVeldon Springs park, which has heen 
under his direct supervision ever since. For 
fifteen year- Mr. Ziegler was president and 
superintendent of the DeWitt County Fair 
Association, and to his personal efforts is 
due the prosperous condition of the same. 
While superintendent he advocated and suc- 
ceeded in having built the water works at the 
fair grounds, even before the city of Clinton 
had them. Mrs. Ziegler and her oldest son 
are members of the (Jniversalist church of 
Clinton, lit- is a member of the blue lodge, 
chapter and commandery of the Masonic fra- 
ternity at Clinton, and he ever endeavors t< > 
live up to the tenets of the order. 



In politics Mr. Ziegler is a stanch Re- 
publican, and has been a member of the 

county central committee for many years. 
In the fall of [889 he was elected to the 
state legislature, serving two years in that 
body. As a public spirited and progressive 
citizen, he has given his support to all m< 
ure- for the public good and his life lias heen 
such as to command the confidence and re- 
spect of all with whom he has come in con- 
tact, either in public or private life. 



JAMES W. THORP. 

The farming interests of Harp township 
are well represented in James W. Thorp, 
who has spent almost his entire life in De- 
Witt county, ami is numbered among its 
most enterprising and successful agricult- 
urists. He was horn in Fall River, Massa- 
chusetts. June <>. 1S4S. and is of English de- 
scent. His father. Joseph Thorp, who is 
now living a retired life in Wapella, was 
born in Lancaster'shire. England, in [826, 
and about 1 S47 married Miss Elizabeth 
Holmes, a native of the same shire and a 
daughter of Joseph Holmes. In 1N47 they 
emigrated to the new world, sailing from 
Liver] 1 on an American vessel, the Niag- 
ara, which, after a voyage of five weeks and 
three days, landed them in New York in July 
of that year. They first settled in Fall River, 
Massachusetts, where the father worked in a 
cotton mill, and after thoroughly mastering 
the business was made overseer of a factory 
at Shirley, that state. Coming west in [856, 
he located permanently in DeWitt county. 
He purchased land in Wilson township and 
successfully engaged in farming there for 
nine years, though he had had no previous 
experience in agricultural pursuits and did 



i6 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



not even know how to harness a horse. Sell- 
ing his farm of eighty acres at the end of 
that time, he bought two hundred and forty 
aero in I [arp b w nship, of w hich sixty acres 
had been broken and a small house and barn 
erected thereon. lie lias since purchased 
other property and now owns four good 
farms, aggregating mx hundred acres, lie 
continued to engage in farming and stock 
raising until [898, when he removed to Wa- 
pella and has since lived a retired life, en- 
joying a well earned rest. lie is a stanch 
supporter of the Republican party, but has 
declined honors along political lines. He 
and his wife are members of the Methodist 
Episcopal church, and are highly respected 
and esteemed by all who know them. 

James \V. Thorp was quite young when 
he accompanied his parents an their removal 
t" this county, and he is indebted to its dis- 
trict schools for his educational advantages. 

lie attended school in winter until about 
twenty years of age and during the summer 
months gave his father the benefit of his 
labor upon the home farm, remaining un- 
der the parental roof until twenty-three, lie 
then purchased ninety-five acres of partially 
improved land in Harp township and has 
since engaged in farming on his own ac- 
count with marked success, lie has erected 
good and substantial buildings upon his 
place, has set out an orchard and ornamental 
trees, and has made many other improve- 
ments, which add greatly to the value and at- 
tractive appearance of the farm. lie has 
also h. night nn ire land and now owns a quar- 
ter section, and besides this he operates other 
tracts to the amount of si\ hundred acres. 

< >n the 27th of September, [877, Mr. 
Thorp was united in marriage with Miss 
Mary Alice Nelson, who was horn in Sanga- 
mon county. Illinois, and is a daughter of 
Louis and Abbie (Guard) Nelson. The fa- 



ther was horn in Norway and was a young 
man when he came to this country, hut the 
mother was a native of Indiana. ( )f the four 
children horn to Mr. and Mrs. Thorp one 
died in infancy. The Others are Claude, now 
attending the Clinton high school; Nelson; 
and Irvin. 

Mr. Thorp is public spirited and pro- 
gressive, and does all in his power to pro- 
mote those enterprises which he believes will 
prove of public benefit. lie :s now serving 
as treasurer of the Prairie (enter Telephone 
I ompany, hut he has never cared for po- 
litical office. By his ballot he supports the 
men and measures of die Republican party, 
and he takes an active interest in its suc- 
cess. Religiousl) he is a member of the 
Methodist Protestant church and steward of 
the sanie. Mis wife is also a member of 

that church. 

— •-•-• 

HENRY MAGILL. 

Clinton has been the home ami scene of 
labor of many men who have not only led 
lives that should serve as an example to 
those who come after them hut have also 
been of important service to their city and 
state through various avenues of usefulness. 
Among them must he named Henry Magill, 
who passed away on the 5th of February, 
[883, after a life of industry, and rich in 
those rare possessions which only a high 
character can give. For many years he la- 
in red with all the strength of a great nature 
and all the earnestness of a true heart for 
the advancement of the county of his adop- 
tion, and when he was called to his final 
rest his best monument was found in the 
love and respect of the community in which 
he lived for so many years. 

A native of the Green Mountain state, 




<4-„i(L^ 




THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



'9 



his birth occurred in Middlebury, Vermont, 
in 1832, his parents being Hugh and Eliza 
Magill, who emigrated to America from the 
north of Ireland about [816. They took up 
their abode upon a farm in Vermont and 
there the following named children were 
born unto them: William: Samuel: Re- 
becca E., who married C. 11. Carpenter; 
Henry; Mary Ann. who was called Mollie 
and became the wife of Nixon Denton; and 
Robert. In 1S41 the parents removed with 
their family to Malone, New York, where 
the father was engaged in business as the 
owner of a large cotton manufactory and a 
eral store. In his undertaking he met 
with splendid success and refused an offer 
of eighty thousand dollars for his mill prop- 
erty, but there came a time when by tire he 
lost all and was left a poorer man than when 
he arrived in Malone, for though his prop- 
erty had been insured, the insurance com- 
pany swindled him out of the entire amount. 
In [851 he went westward to Michigan City, 
Indiana, where s< * n afterward he was ji lined 
by his family. There Hugh Magill took a 
contract for grading and tiling the roadbed 
of the Michigan Central Railroad from 
Michigan City to Chicago, in which venture 
he was joined by his sons. When the work 
had been successfully executed he and his 
s'>n William went to Bloomington, Illinois, 
in February, [853, and took a c ntract for 
the building of the Chicago & Alton Rail- 
road from Bloomington to Lexington, under 
the firm name of the Emery-Magill Com- 
pany, and later they built sixteen mile- of 
the Illinois Central Railroad from Bloom- 
ington to Hudson. The four soii> became 
partners in their father's business and ex- 
tended their field of operations, opening a 
large general store in Bloomington, which 
was managed by Samuel and Henry Magill. 



while William and Robert assisted the father 
in the execution of the contracts. 

In [854 the family removed to Clinton, 
bringing with them a Mock of merchandise 
ti-om the Bloomington store. In [855 they 

sold the HI nington -ton- to Mr. Emery 

and bought out the firm of Phares & Shorer, 
at Clmt' n. This \\ a- the beginning of the 
extensive business s,, long successfully con- 
ducted by the Magill Company, consisting 
of the brothers William. Samuel and 
I lenry. In the same year the firm 1 »f Magill. 
Denton & Company took a contract to build 
a portion <i the Dubuque & Sioux City 
Railroad. In [858 the linn of Mason, Ma- 
gill. Dent' 11 i\ G mpany built a large part 
of the Minneapolis & St. Raul Railroad. 
The same year the firm of Magill & Com- 
pany began business as dealers in >t> ck, in 
addition to their operation- along mercan- 
tile lines. Each of the br< thers had the su- 
perintendence of a certain portion of the 
business, which he successfully managed and 
thus added to the general capital. William 
and Robert had charge of the purchase 
stock, while Samuel and I lenry were in con- 
trol 1 f the business in the city. Every dol- 
lar which they had and every acre of land 
which was purchased went into a common 
fund, and by keeping their capital thus 
united they were enabled to carry on busi- 
ness 1 n a large scale and with greater pros- 
perity. 

Henry Magill possessed rare tact and 
business judgment, and as a financial man- 
ager he had but few equals in this part of 
the state. His brother generously attrib- 
uted much of the success of the firm of 
Magill & Company to him and hi- splendid 
executive ability and keen discernment. For 
some time the brother- owned but little laud. 
preferring to use their capital in enterprises 



20 



Till- BIOGRAPHIC \L RECORD. 



that would bring quicker returns, but with 
their usual foresight they saw that it was 
only ;• question of time when DeWitt county 
farms would he very valuable. Accord- 
ingly, they In night new land when oppor- 
tunity offered, and. retaining possession ol 
these, they have seen some of them more 

than double in value. They owned several 
thousand acres of the finesl land in the coun- 
ty, all of which is under a very high state 
of cultivation and improved with all the 
modem accessories and conveniences found 
upon model farms, in the year 1870 Ma- 
gill X' Company graded the roadbed and fur- 
nished and placed the ties and irons for the 
Gilman, Clinton & Springfield Railroad from 
Clinton to Gilman, ami Henry Magill was 
largely instrumental in securing the benefits 
of this road f' r Clinton, lie was also ac- 
tive in raising the money toward securing 
the h cation 1 1 the machine simps here, and 
thus, directly and indirectly, he contributed 
in large measure to the substantial upbuild- 
ing and improvement oi the city. 

On the death of Robert Magill, in [874, 
his share of the property was withdrawn 
from the Ihmiic^ for the use of his widow 
and children and the remaining bn theis or- 
ganized under the name .if Magill Brothers. 
This lirm also had an equal interest in the 
hanking house of John Warner & Company. 
Whatever the) became interested in pn 
a profitable venture. Although thej came 
to the west in verv limited financial circum- 
stances, within thirty years they were 
wealth) men. having control of mammoth 
business enterprises. The secret of their 
pn sperity is short and simple. It resulted 
from indefatigable and honest effort, sup- 
plemented by almost unerring judgment in 
business transactions. They belonged i" 
that class of representative American citizens 
who. while promoting individual success. 



also contribute in large measure to the gen- 
eral prosperity and welfare, and Clinton is 
indebted in large measure to their efforts in 
her behalf. They erected here a tine three- 
story brick hotel, yet known as the Magill 
House, and they gave generously to every 
enterprise which would benefit the city along 
material, social, educational and moral lines. 
Although they were not memhers of "the 
Methodist Episcopal church, they were most 
liberal contributors to the fund for the erec- 
11 n of the h( nise 1 >f W( 'iship. The firm ever 
sustained an unassailable reputation for 
honesty in all trade transactions, and the 
w 1 ird 1 <i any 1 >ne 1 >i the hi'' tthers vv as as g< .1 mI 

as his bond, and that was as g 1 as gold. 

Rarel) have brothers worked together in 
such perfect harmony: the ability and enter- 
prise of the one seemed to round out and 
make symmetrical that of the others, and in 
close companionship they continued their 
labors with mutual pleasure and in', lit. 

Although he led an extremely bus) hie, 
the interest of Henry Magill centered in his 
home and family. All of his efforts were 
put forth that he might add to their a mfort 
and happiness. I le was married . 11 the loth 
■ f February, \Xy>. to Mis> Malissa F. 
Bowren, a native of Winchester. Kentucky, 
and a daughter of Alfred Bowren. She is 
a most estimable lady, who to her husband 
was ever a faithful companii n ami In 1; mate. 
The graces .if true womanhood, the culture 
of a nature essentially refined have made her 
most highly esteemed by all. and in her im- 
mediate circle of friends she is greatly loved. 
Unto Mr. and Mrs. Magill were horn the 
following named children: llattie Eliza, 
widow of Charles Finney Amsden; Harry 
Alfred; and M. Gertrude, wife of Dr. J. IX 
M< ore, a dentist of Decatur, Illinois. 

A man of strong character and forceful 
individuality. Mr. Magill's life was guided 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



by high principles, his example and influence 
were felt by all with whom he was associ- 
ated. His judgment was safe and reliable, 

pinions were just and his sympathy 
sure. His was the controlling mind in the 
business enterprise of the firm, yet there was 

irit of domination in any of his rela- 
tions with his brothers. He had no aspira- 
tions for political honors or office and could 
rarelv be induced to take part in public af- 
fairs. The only position he ever filled was 
that of school director, and he accepted that 
only when he was led to see that he might 
do better service for the school when in the 
office than out of it. Every measure cal- 
culated for the public good received bis en- 
d irsement, and substantial aid was given to 
all practical movements for the general wel- 
fare. In manner he was entirely free fn in 
ostentation, and the character of the individ- 
ual was the only thing which influenced his 
friendship inviolable. When once his con- 
fidence and friendship were given they were 
given for always unless he found that dis- 
honor sundered the tie. T< i his family he 
was most tenderly devoted. Purchasing the 
old Cushman home, he enlarged and remod- 
eled the residence and in that the family 
pass 1 seventeen happy years. He then re- 
moved it to its present site on North Mon- 
r e street, and on the site where it formerly 
stood he erected a very handsome residence. 
in which bis widow still resides — one of the 
most beautiful homes in the entire county. 
The home is surrounded by spacious 
grounds adorned with beautiful shade trees 
and beautified by the arts of the landscape 
gardener. Here Mr. Magill spent hi- last 
days. For almost three years prior t" his 
death be had suffered fn m ill health, but 
change of climate and medical skill proved 
ineffectual. He was honored and esteemed 

tily for his splendid business ability hut 



also for his many manly virtues and genu- 
ine worth. 

"llis life was gentle, and the elements 
So mixed in him that Nature might stand up 
And sav to all the w < >rld, 'This was a man.' ' 



ISAAC 1". HOUSEMAN. 

One of the most prominent an influential 
business men of farmer City is Isaac F. 
Houseman, vice-president of the Old First 
National Bank. He was born near Monti- 
cello. Piatt county. Illinois. March 25, [849, 
and is a son of Isaac P. and Elizabeth 
1 Fisher) Houseman, and grandson of Isaac 
F. and Elizabeth Houseman. The grand- 
father, who was a farmer and stock raiser 
by occupation, died when over eighty years 
of age. In his family were seven children, 
two sons and rive daughters, the former be- 
ing Joseph and Isaac F. The father of our 
subject was born in Xew London. Ohio, and 
in early life removed to Piatt count}-. Illi- 
nois, where, as a farmer and stock raiser. 
he was meeting with good success at the time 
of his death, which occurred October 26, 
1854, when be was forty-six years of age. 
His home was in Goose (.'reek township, 
that county. His wife died 111 [860, at the 
age of forty-four years and five months, and 
the remains of both were interred in Fisher 
cemetery. Champaign county. They bad a 
family 'of nine children, namely: Abigail 
M.. wife of C. I.. Mi mroe; John, who died at 
the age of twenty-one years; Emily M.. wife 
of \V. P. Shaffer; Prances .1-'.. wife >>\ John 
Withers: William, who wedded Mary free- 
love: Lydia A., deceased wife of W. A. 
Steen; James Ward, a resident of Kansas; 
Isaac P. our subject: and Charles (.'.. who 
married Kate Wright. 



22 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



Being left an orphan at an early age, our 
subject lias made his own wav in the world 
unaided. He first attended the public 
schools, and then engaged in teaching until 
he had earned enough to pay his wax 
through the Wesleyan Institute at Bloom- 
ington, Illinois, His time was practically de- 
voted to school teaching from [868 until 
1884, when he was male assistant cashier 
of the (»lil First National Bank at Farmer 
City, with which he has since been connect 
ed in an official capacity. 

This bank, which is one "t" the best -1 
the county, was organized June 1. \>>~-\. with 
a capital stoek of fifty thousand dollars, the 
officers being James 11. Harrison, president; 
Cary Burford, vice-president ; and I.. I'«. I 
win. cashier; while the stockholders were 
s Burford, James II. Harrison, Robert 
( >. Crawford, Samuel I'.. Erwin, George W. 
Herrick. Andrew M. Cumming, David Eel- 
ley. William W. Murphy, William C. 
Wrathbun, W. G. Cochran, R. E. Moreland, 
George W. Snook and William Latham. In 
1NS4 Mr. Harrison resigned, and R. O. 
1 rawford served a-- president two years, be 
ing succeeded by Jacob B. Lewis, at which 
time A. M. Cummings was elected vice pres- 
ident. On the i>t of January, [886, R. O. 
iwford was elected president ; T. II. Slick, 
vice-president; J. 11. Harrison, cashier, and 
I. F. Houseman, assistant cashier. The next 
change made in its officers was January 1. 
1891, when Mr. Harrison was succeeded by 
('.. \V. Chisholm as vice-president. Up t.i 
the expiration of the charter in iS<>4. the 
cashiers of the hank were L. B. Erwin, until 
January 1. 1S75 : William Young, the fol- 
lowing year: A. F. Davison, the next; and 
F. J. Miller from the 1st of January. [877, 
until the 1st of January. [886, when he was 
succeeded by Mr. Harrison, and in [887 he 
was succeeded by Mr. Houseman. The hank 



was reorganized as the OKI Erst National 
I lank of Farmer City, January 1. [894, with 
a capital stock of sixty-live thousand dollars, 
the officers being R. ( ). Crawford, president; 
Jacob Swigart, vice-president; and I. F. 
Houseman, cashier, and D. L. Fuller, as- 
sistant cashier. On the death of Mr. Craw- 
ford, in August of that year, he was suc- 
ceeded by Mr. Swigart, and our subject was 
elected vice president and D. L. Fuller, cash- 
ier. The stockholders of the new organiza- 
tion are 1. F. Houseman. II. II. Gilmore, 
R. ( >. Crawford, Morton Kent. Gus Levy, 
M. T. Mace. Jacob Swigart, F. IV Sangster, ^ 
James Jacks,,u. John McDonald, <rr±- Bur- -V' 
ford. Hirum Doner, Dr. M. Mclnty're, D. 
W. Richards, T. L. [jams, John Watson, 
lames Watson. G. Watson and David L 
Fuller, The hank is in a flourishing condi- 
1 1, ,11 and n, ,\\ has a surplus 1 if eight tin msand 
dollars. The original hank building was 
built of brick with a very substantial vault, 
which was entirely unharmed when the 
building was burned in [879. It was at on 
rebuilt, and is a good brick structure, twen- 
ty-two bj eighty-eight feet, and two stories 
in height. It is located on the corner of 
Main and Green street, which was formerly 
the sue of William Young's residence. 

Mr. Houseman was married. December 
7. [875, to Miss tiara I.. Weedman, a 
daughter of Isaiah Weedman, who was a 
representative of one of the prominent and 
successful early families of this section ol 
the state. By this union were horn two chil- 
dren : ( iuy Weedman. who is now a student 
in pharmacy at the Northwestern University 
at Chicago; and Ruth Elizabeth, aged four 
\ears. Mrs. Houseman is one of the most 
popular and leading ladies of the city. The 
family have an elegant home on John street, 
and besides this property Mr. Houseman 
owns business property in Farmer City. He 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



?3 



i- a member of Farmer City Lodge, No. 710. 
A. F. & A. M., of which he is past master; 
Farmer City Chapter. No. 175. R. A. M.: 
and both he and his wife belong to the East- 
em Star Chapter of the same order. They 
are also members of the Methodist Episcopal 
church, in which he has served as steward 
for twelve year-. Politically Mr. House- 
man is identified with the Republican party. 
His strict integrity and honorable dealing 
in business commend him to the confidence 
nf all : his pleasant manner wins him friends : 
and he is one of the popular and hi mured 
citizens of Farmer City. 



WILLIAM MAGILL. 

The subject of this review needs no spe- 
cial introduction to the readers of this vol- 
ume, but the work would be incomplete with- 
out the record of his life. No man in De- 
Witt county lias been more prominently 
identified with its commercial and agricult- 
ural interests 1 >r has taken a more active part 
in its upbuilding and development. 

A native of the Green Mountain state. 
Mr. Magill was- born in Middleburv. Ver- 
mont, September 8, 1823, and was a son of 
Hugh and Eliza Magill. who emigrated to 
America from Ireland about 1816. Our sub- 
ject was the eldest of their six children, the 
others being Samuel; Rel>ecca F., wife of C. 
H. Carpenter: Henry: Mary Ann, wife of 
Nixon Denton: and Robert. The family 
lived on a farm in Vermont until 1841. when 
they removed to Malone, New York, where 
the father carried on a large cotton manu- 
factory and a general store. There he met 
with excellent success in business until his 
property was all destroyed by tire, and as the 
insurance company swindled him out of his 



insurance, he lost everything. In 1851 he 
went to Michigan City, Indiana, and took a 
contract for grading and tiling the roadbed 
of the Michigan Central Railroad from that 
place to Chicago, in which venture he was 
joined by his son-. Being the oldest -on. 
Wiliam Magill sought employment im- 
mediately after his father's property in New 
York was burned, and he early developed ex- 
ceptional business and executive ability. 
When the work on the Michigan Central 
Railmad was completed he and his father 
went to Bloomington, Illinois, in February, 
[853, and took a contract for building the 
Chicago & Alton Railroad from that place 
to Lexington, under the linn name of Fm- 
erv-Magill Company, and later they built 
-ixteen miles of the Illinois Central Rail- 
road from Bloomington to Hudson. The 
four sons became partners in their father's 
business and extended their field of opera- 
tions, opening a large general store in 
Bloomington, which was managed by Sam- 
uel and Henry, while William and Robert 
as-isted the father in the execution of the 
contracts. 

After spending six years in Blooming- 
ton, William Magill came to Clinton, where 
the brothers opened a store, but subsequent- 
ly sold 1 mt to Mr. Emery and purchased the 
stock of Phares & Shorer. This store they 
conducted under the firm name of Magill 
Company, consisting of the brothers. Will- 
iam. Samuel and Henry. In 1855 the firm of 
Magill. Denton & Company took a con- 
tract to build a portion of the Dubuque & 
Sioux City Railroad, and in 1S5S the firm of 
Mason. Magill. Denton & Company built a 
large part of the Minneapolis & St. Paul 
Railroad. In the latter year the firm of Ma- 
gill & Company began dealing in stock, and 
having a special liking for that branch of 
the business. William Magill gave his at- 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



tention throughout the remainder of his life 
to farming and stuck buying, in which he 
was assisted by his brother Robert, while 
Samuel and Henry had control of the busi- 
ness in the city. Every dollar which they 
had and every acre of land which was pur- 
chased went into a common \\u\A, and by 
keeping their capital thus united they were 
enabled to carry on business on a large scale 
and with greater prosperity. Foreseeing the 
n^e in value of DeWitt county property, 
they bought land quite extensively, and 
owned several thousand acres of the finest 
land in the county, all of which is under a 
high state of cultivation and improved with 
all the modern accessories and conveniences 
found upon model farms. The brothers were 
also interested in the banking house of John 
Warner & Company, at Clinton, and met 
with remarkable success in all their under- 
takings. < 'u coming to the west thej w 
in limited circumstances, hut within thirty 

s were wealthy men and their prosperity 
a just reward fur their cli Se appli 
cation to business, and well-directed, em 
effi irts. 

Mr. Magill was united in marriage with 
Miss Mary Sims, a daughter <>t Simon and 
Christianna (Lambert) Sims. Her father 
was a native of Glasgow, Scotland, and a 
son of James and Margaret i Wilson) Sims, 
the former i if whom died at the age of sixty- 
four years, the latter at th< I sixty. 
Simon Sims was manager of mines in Scot- 
land, hut on coming to America he settled in 
Franklin county. New York, and turned his 
attention to agricultural pursuits. He died 
when over sixty years of age, hut his wife, 
who was of German descent, died young. 
Their children were Isabel, Margaret, Jane, 
lames. Christiana, Jennette and Mary. Mr. 
and Mrs. Magill were married in Malone, 
New York, and became the parents of the 



following children: ( 1 ) Eliza died at the 
age of twenty-three years. (2) Christiana 
is the wife of James Belknap, of Manchester. 
Iowa, and they have three sons: Frank, 
William and Bernard. (3) Henry died in 
infancy. (4) William, a farmer oi Man- 
chester. Iowa, married Lou Kates and has 
one daughter, Mary. (5) Mary Isabel is 
the wife of Frank Phares, of Clinton, and 

the) have two children. Hugh and Day. (6) 
Hugh, a resident of Clinton, married Anna 
Carroll and they have four children : Hugh 
Goodbreak, Carroll, Norme and Hon. (7) 
Callie is the wife of J. J. Pentley, of Man- 
chester. Iowa, and they have five children. 
Madge, Mazie, tiara. Joseph and Beatrice. 
Mr. Magill owned a beautiful home one 
mile east of Clinton, where he died Septem- 
ber 19, 1883, but his wife has since removed 
to ( 'lint on. where in [899 she erected a hand- 
some modern residence. She still owns con- 
siderable property, and in the management 
of her affairs has displayed excellent judg- 
ment and good business ability. Mr. Magill 
never aspired to office, 1ml was a stanch sup- 
porter of the Republican party, and ever 
cheerfull) gave his support to those enter 
prises that tend to public development. His 
name was a synonym for honorable business 
dealing ; he was always mentioned as one ol 
the invaluable citizens of the county, and 
among her leading and representative men 
his name should he among the foremost. 



JAMES P. STR VNGE. 

One of Waynesville's most honored and 
highly respected citizens is James I'. 
Strange, who has now laid aside all husiness 
cares and is living a retired life. He was 
horn in this county on the 1 8th of June, 



Till-. I'.K (GRAPHICAL RED IRD. 



-^5 



[840, and is a worthy representative of a 
prominent pioneer family. His father, John 
S. Strange, was born near Louisville, Ken- 
tucky, where his ancestors located at an early 

<lay. and there Ik- grew ti 1 manh 1 ami mar- 
ried a Mi-- Robinson. In [829 he came t" 

Illinois and located in what i- now DeWitt 
Count)', where he pre-empted and later en- 
tered t\V0 hundred and forty acres, which he 

broke and transformed into a good farm. 
becoming one of the most thrifty and sub- 
stantial agriculturists of his community. 
His first wife died about [838, and he sub- 
sequently married Miss Nancy Scott, a na- 
tive of Tennessee, and a daughter of John 
Scott, who was one of the first settler- of 
this county. Mr. Strange died here in [856, 
and his wife, who survived him for some 
year-, passed away on the lXth of March. 
[867, both being laid to rest in Rock (reek 
cemetery. Waynesville township. 

James I'. Strange, of this review, is the 
oldest in a family of seven children. -i\ -mis 
and one daughter, all of whom reached years 
of maturity, and five of the sons are still liv- 
ing and are residents of Illinois. He passed 
the day- of his 6byhood and youth under the 
parental roof, and was educated in the home 
school. After hi- father's death he took 
charge of the farm and later purchased the 
interests • if the 1 ither heirs, and still 1 iwns the 
old home place, where he lived for half a 
century. He erected thereon a good house 
and barn, and made many other improve- 
ment-, and throughout his active business 
life successfully engaged in general farming 
and stock raising. Having acquired suffi- 
cient capital to enable him to spend the re- 
mainder -4 his life in ease and quiet, he re- 
moved to Waynesville in the spring of 1 s. > ■> 
and built a large modern residence — one of 
the best in the town, lie was one of the 
tir-t st, ,ckh' ilders and is now a director of the 



Waynesville Bank, one of the substantial 
moneyed institutions of the county, which 
was organized in [892 and has a capital 
stock of twenty five thousand dollars. 

Mr. Strange was united in marriage I >< 
cember 3, [863, with Miss Nancj Smoot, 
who was born and reared in this state, and 
was a daughter of Henry Smoot. a native of 
Virginia, and a pioneer of DeWitt county. 
She died in tSj_>, leaving one son, Arthur, 
at home with his father, lie was for eleven 
years in the railway mail service of the Lake 
Erie & Western Railroad. Mr. Strange was 
again married in this county. September [9, 
[878, hi- second union being with Miss 
Mary Booth, who grew to womanhood in 
Illinois, and is a daughter of John Booth, 
one of the early settler- of DeWitt county. 

Politically Mr. Strange supports the men 
and measures of the Democratic party, and 
has taken quite an active ami influential part 
in local politics. He was elected and served 
as township collector three year-; supervisor 
one year ; assessor ten consecutive year- : and 
commissioner of highways thirteen years. 
1 >n coming to Waynesville he was oppointed 
postmaster under President Cleveland, and 
acceptably filled that office for four years. 
He has also been a member of the vill 
board six years and president of the -ante 
one term, and while living mi the farm 
served twenty-four year- as school director, 
and al-o as clerk and president of the district 
a part of the time. He has held some office 
continually since [871, and his public duties 
have always been most faithfully and satis- 
factorily performed. Religiously he and his 
wife are members of the Christian church, 
and socially he belongs to Prairie State 
Lodge, No. 104. I. ( ). ( ). ]•'.. in which he has 
rilled all the chairs and is past grand and 
past district deputy. He has also represent- 
ed his lodge in the grand lodge three or four 



26 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



times, and is a prominent member of Wayne 
Lodge, No. 172. F. & A. M., in which he is 
now serving as secretary, while both he and 
his wife belong to the Eastern Star and Re- 
bekah lodges. They are well known through- 
out this section of the county, and it is safe 
in say thai no couple in the community have 
im ire friends. 



HON. JOHN WARNER. 

There may be found in almost all Ameri- 
can communities quiet, retiring men, who 
never ask public office or appear prominent 

in public affairs, yet who, nevertheless, exert 
a widel) fell influence in the community in 
which they live and help to construct the 
proper foundation upon which the social and 
political world is built. Such a man is the 
I Inn. John Warner, of Clinton, who for 
more than a half century ha-- resided in De- 
Witt county. He lias been an important 
factor in business circles and his popularity 
is well deserved, as in him are embraced the 
characteristics of an unbending integrity, 
unabating energy and industry that never 
flags, lie is public spirited and thoroughly 
interested in whatever tends to promote the 
moral, intellectual and material welfare of 
Clinton, and with its growth has been iden- 
tified from the time when he came to the 
county and found Clinton a little village of 
less than one hundred inhabitants, lie is 
now the president of the John Warner 
Hank, hut this represents only one branch of 
his various actn ities. 

Mr. Warner was horn in Rockingham 
county. Virginia, July 24. [819, a son of 
David and Catherine (Kettner) Warner. 
The Warner family is of German lineage 
and was founded in Pennsylvania at an 
early period in the development of that state. 
The father of our subject was a native of 



the Keystone state, and throughout his en- 
tire life he followed farming. Removing 
to the Old Dominion, he there married Cath- 
erine Kettner, whose birth occurred in the 
same house in which her son John was horn. 
When the latter was fifteen years of age the 
parents removed with the family to Henry 
county. Indiana, where the father purchased 
a farm, which he continued to cultivate for 
a long period. lie died at the age of sev- 
enty years, his wife having passed away a 
few years previously. They were the par- 
ents of seven children, of whom John was 
the third in order of birth, and the only one 
who ever came to DeWitt countv. 

John Warner spenl the first fifteen years 
of his life in the state of his nativity and 
then became a resident of Indiana. I lis ed- 
ucational privileges were those afforded by 
the common schools, hut instruction was 
given him in both English and German. At 
the age of eighteen he entered upon his busi- 
ness career as a clerk in the dry goods store 
of Conner, Stephenson i\- Company, at Alex- 
andria. Indiana. In 1839, after Struggling 
for three years through the hard times which 
followed the financial panic of 1837, the 
linn was compelled to discontinue business 
and Mr. Warner was thus left without em- 
ployment. Me then began the study of 
medicine under the direction of Dr. Car- 
mine, at Anderson, Indiana, who directed 
his reading for about eighteen months, at 
the end of which time the Doctor departed 
this life. Mr. Warner then continued his 
studies at leisure months while engaged in 
teaching school, the winter season being de- 
ited to that profession. 

In November, 1X40, Mr. Warner was 
united in marriage to Miss Cynthia Ann 
Gardner, a daughter of Thomas Gardner, a 
farmer of Middle-town. Indiana, and in the 
Spring of the following year they removed 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



t" DeWitt county, Illinois. Unto them 
were born four children, namely: Ves 
pasian, who is now congressman from the 

thirteenth district of Illinois: Mrs. Flora 
Mace, a resident of New York City; Mrs. 
Minnie Mettler. of Chicago; and Arabella, 
at home. After practicing in the count) 
a year Dr. Warner took up his abode in the 
village of Clinton — a mere hamlet, where the 
work of progress and upbuilding had hardly 
been begun. Here he engaged in the prac- 
tice of medicine for twelve years, on the ex- 
piration of which period he abandoned his 
profession. This was in the year 1S52. In 
1848 he had been elected clerk of the cir- 
cuit court, and had discharged his duties in 
a prompt and commendable manner. On 
ceasing to practice medicine he engaged in 
dealing in real estate and in conducting a 
mercantile business until 1861. Then in 
[867, in company with Henry Magill. J. R. 
Warner and Lawrence VVeldon, he embarked 
in the banking business in Clinton, under the 
firm name of John Warner & Company. 
Operations have since been carried on under 
this name, although Mr. Warner is now the 
only surviving member of the original firm. 
The institution of which he is the president 
has weathered many financial panics, stand- 
ing strong before the storm, the confidence 
and support <<i the public increasing year 
by year. The bank is uniformly acknowl- 
_-.d to he one of the most reliable moneyed 
concerns in this part of the state, it- officers 
and stockholders being men of unquestioned 
business ability, worthy of the highest trust. 
Politically Mr. Warner ha- been a Re- 
publican since the organization of the party. 
In fact before its establishment he advocat- 
ed Republican principles and attended tin- 
meeting held in Bloomington, where views 
were set forth which were afterward em- 
bodied 111 the Republican platform. He 



has labored earnestlj for good government, 
both local and national, and believes thai 

not the least of man's duty is hi- exen 
of his right of franchise in support of the 
men and measures that he thinks will b 
advance the general good. In the winter 
of 1854-5 he was a member of the llln 
legislature and stood fearless and strong in 
defense of whatever he believed to be 
right. When the slavery question and its 
extension involved the country in Civil war. 
he volunteered for service in April, [81 
raised a company in DeWitt county and as- 
sisted in organizing the Forty-first R< 
ment of Illinois, of which be was elected 
major. He participated in the battles of 
Fort Henry. Fort Donelson and Shiloh, and 
at the last named, after the death of Lieu- 
tenant-Colonel Tupper, who had command 
of the regiment. Major Warner was com- 
missioned lieutenant-colonel. In Septem- 
ber. 1862, however, on account of illness, he 
was obliged to resign. 

There has been no movement started in 
DeWitt county for the public benefit that 
has sought and not received his aid and co- 
operation. He has been foremost in every 
good work, and no citizen deserves more 
honorable mention in a volume of tins char- 
acter than John Warner. His business life 
is one of strictest honesty. Strong and 
fearless in action and stainless in reputation 
the people among whom he has so [ong re- 
sided rejoice in his honors and successes 
and an enumeration of the distinguished 
men of the county would be incomplete 
without his life history. 



JOSEPH T. M \hl>( ).\. 

Prominent among the prosperous and 
substantial citizens of Harnett township is 
Joseph 'I'. Maddox, who owns and operates 



30 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



a valuable farm of four hundred acres on 
section 19. He is one of the most success- 
ful stock dealers in the county, and has found 
that branch of his business quite profitable. 
A native of Illinois, he was born in Logan 
county, on the 15th of January. 1X4S, and 
is a son of Thomas M. Maddox, who is rep- 
resented on another page of this volume. 
Our subject was reared on the old home- 
stead farm in DeWitt count)', and acquired 
his education in the local schools. lie re- 
mained with his father until aboul thirty 
years of age and obtained a good practical 
knowledge of agricultural pursuits. 

Mr. Maddox was married in Logan 
county, October [6, [878, tO.Miss Mary C. 
Curry, who was horn in Gibson county. In- 
diana, hut was reared and educated in Logan 
couut\. Illinois. Her father, W. ( '. Curry, 
is now .1 resident of Beason. The children 
born to our subject and his wife are Elmer, 
who is now assisting his father in the opera- 

of the hi ime farm ; Estella Maud and 
Dora Elizabeth, both at home; and one son, 
\\ ho dud in infancy. 

After his marriage Mr. Maddox located 
on the farm where lie now resides, having 
pi cv ii >usly purchased twi 1 hundred acres, and 
to that amount he has since added until he 
now has four hundred acres of well im- 
proved and valuable land. His large and 
pleasant residence is surrounded by a good 
set "f outbuildings, and everything about 
the place indicates the thrift and enterprise 
of the owner. He has two Other farms, one 
in Atlanta and the other in Waynesville 
townships, aggregating two hundred and 
seventy acres, and is a stockholder in the 
State Bank of Clinton. Throughout his 
business career he lias been interested in live- 
stock, ami feeds many head of cattle and 
hogs for market annually. He also breeds 
Percheron draft horse- and standard bred 



roadsters, and as a breeder has an enviable 
reputation throughout this section ol the 
state. Starting out in life for himself with 
no capital, his record is one well worthy of 
emulation and contains many valuable les- 
sens of incentive, showing the possibilities 
that are open to young men who wish to 
improve every opportunity for advancement, 
lie is a man of good business ability and 
sound judgment, and to his own well-direct- 
ed efforts is due his success in life. 

Since attaining his majority Mr. Mad- 
dox has always supported the Democratic 
party and its principles, and has taken quite 
an active part in local politics. He served as 
county supervisor from Barnett township 
for nine consecutive years, with credit to 
himself and to the entire satisfaction of his 

JtituentS, was chairman of the finance 
committee and a member of various other 
committees. He has ;iK. ■ 1 ecu a delegate 
to the countv and congressional conventions 
of his partv, and has exerted considerable 
influence in public affairs. Fraternally he is 
a member of Wayne Lodge, X". [72, I'. & 
A. M 



SAMUEL A. EDWARDS. 

Samuel A. Edwards, proprietor and pub- 
lisher of the Kenney Gazette, is a native of 
Whiteside county, Indiana, and was born on 
November _'_'. [868, and lived in his native 
place until lie was seven years of age. He is 
a son of Samuel and I.avina (Norris) Ed- 
wards, both of whom were natives of Ohio, 
and the father was a farmer all his life. He 
came to Illinois at an early date and rented 
land in Woodford county, where he engaged 
in farming for some years. Then he moved 
to White count), Indiana, where lie fanned 
until his death, which took place on Novem- 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



3i 



her 25, 1875. His wife died in 1872 and 
she was buried at the home place in Indi- 
ana. She was the mother of nine children, 
only three of whom are living, two boys and 
one girl. 

After the death of his father our sub- 
ject was bound out to a farmer of Wood- 
ford county, near Roanoke, and here he re- 
mained for about five years. This man 
would not send our subject to school and the 
young hoy had such a desire for learning 
that he resolved to start out in life for him- 
self and be free to do as he wished with re- 
gard to attending school. With this idea in 
view he came to W'apella. where his eldest 
sister resided, and worked out by the month, 
attending school in the winter at Elm Grove 
school in Barnett township. It is wonder- 
ful how much education can he obtained un- 
der difficulties, for this young fellow with so 
few advantages studied so hard whenever he 
could that by the time he was seventeen he 
had secured a certificate to teach. Xever 
was anyone so proud of a medal conferred 
upon him as was our subject when he ob- 
tained permission to impart the information 
he had worked so hard for. to others. In 
the spring of 1885 he commenced to teach 
ami continued in this line until 1890. and by 
that time, although still so young, he was 
principal of the schools of DeWitt, Illinois. 
In 1890, [891, [892 and 1893 he was prin- 
cipal of the schools at Kenney. During all 
these years his active mind was constantly 
assimilating information, and in addition to 
his various duties he read law with the well- 
known firm of Munson & Mitchell, of Clin- 
ton, ami after two years of hard study he 
graduated from the Dixon Normal School 
in 1895 and received honors in literature and 
other lines. He also served as superintend- 
ent of the Mt. Pulaski city schools during 
1895-6, hut was compelled to abandon teach- 



ing on account of ill health. Few people 
could have stood the strain this ambitious 
young man put upon himself, teaching all 
day and spending the greater part of the 
night gather together more information. 
Feeling the necessity of taking better care of 
himself he embarked in newspaper work, 
which his extensive studies had admirably 
fitted him for. and in March, 1897, he found- 
ed the Gazette and has continued it ever 
since, building up an excellent circulation 
and making it a popular paper with all 
class,.-, anil the organ of his party in that lo- 
cality. Mr. Edwards is an easy, fluent writer. 
His knowledge of current events is almost 
unbounded and his command of language 
such as to make his editorials play a promi- 
nent part in the management and de- 
velopment of local affairs. In addi- 
tion to being a fluent writer. Mr. 
Edwards is a good business manager 
and exhibits his executive ability in the 
conduct of the affairs of the Gazette, while 

his staff is particularly g 1. In politics he 

is a Democrat and is recognized as one of 
the party leaders. Since locating in Kenney 
he has served as town clerk to the entire sat- 
isfaction of not only his constituents, but 
also the city in general. I low ever, his many 
duties and his ever-absorbing love of read- 
ing and study keep bint from giving as 
much of his time and attention to public mat- 
ters as his patriotic spirit would lead him to. 
Socially he is an active member of the Or- 
der of Odd Fellows, Kenney Lodge. No 
Z57. 

On November 23, [898, Mr. Edwards 
was married at Mt. Pulaski, Illinois, to Miss 
Mayme Lynn, a native "i" Illinois and the 
charming and accomplished daughter of 
John \\ . Lynn, who is a prominent retired 
farmer now residing at Mt. Pulaski, Illinois. 
Mr. Lynn was one of the early settlers of 



32 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



Sangamon county, Illinois, but recently 
moved to Mi. Pulaski, whore he is surround- 
ed by the comforts of life his own industry 
has provided for him, and he enjoys the re- 
spect and esteem of a wide circle of friends. 
Mr. and Mrs. Edwards are very pleasant 
and intellectual young people, whom it is de- 
lightful to meet. Their friend- are num- 
bered 1>\ legions, and they are leader- in the 
social life of Kenney. Possessing in marked 
degree as they do the requisites of true hos- 
pitality, their home is often a |.le:i-ant 
gathering place for friend-, and no social 
event is complete without their presei 



SAMUEL .MM. 11.1. 



Samuel Magill, deceased, did as much 
to promote the commercial activity, advance 

the general welfare and secure the material 
development of Clinton as probably any 
other individual. As a business man he 
was enterprising, energetic and always 
abreast of the times, and was rewarded by 
an ample fortune. 

Mr. Magill wa- horn in Middlehury. 
Vermont, on the 14th of July. 1826, and 
was a -on of Hugh and Eliza Magill, who 
emigrated to America from the north of 
Ireland about [816 and settled on a farm 
in the Green Mountain -tale. Their chil- 
dren were William; Samuel: Rebecca E., 
wife of C. II. Carpenter; Henry: Mary Ann. 
wife of Nixon Denton; and Robert. In 
[84] the parent- removed with their family 
to Malone, New York, where the father 
was engaged in business as the owner of a 
large cotton manufactory and a general 
store. In his undertakings he met with 
splendid success and refused an offer of 
eighty thousand dollar- for his mill proper- 



ty, hut there came a time when by tire he 
lost all. and was left a poorer man than 
when he arrived in Malone. for though his 
property had been insured thei nsurance 
company swindled him out of the entire 
amount. In [851 he went westward to 
Michigan City. Indiana, where -0011 after- 
ward he was joined by his family. There 
Hugh Magill took a contract for grading 
and tiling the roadbed of the Michigan Cen- 
tral Railroad from Michigan City to Chi- 

o, m which venture he wa- joined by his 
-on-. When the work had been succ< 
fully executed he and hi- son William went 
to Bloomington, Illinois, in February, 1853, 
and took a contract for building the Chi- 

■ & Alton Railroad from Bloomington 
to Lexington, under the linn name of the 
Emery-Magill Company, and later they 
built sixteen mile- of the Illinois Central 
Railroad from Bloomington to Hudson. 
The four sons became partners in their fa- 
ther'- business and extended their field of 
operations, opening a large general store in 
Bloomington, which wa- managed by Sam- 
uel and Henry Magill, while William and 
Robert assisted the father in the execution 
of the contrai t-. 

In [854 the family removed to Clinton. 
bringing with them a stock of merchandise 
from the Bloomington -tore. In 1855 they 
sold the Bloomington -tore to Mr. Emery 
and bought out the firm of I 'hare- & Shorer 
at Clinton. This was the beginning of the 
extensive business so long successfully con- 
ducted by the Magill Company, consisting 
of the brothers, William. Samuel and Hen- 
ry. In the same year the firm of Magill, 
Denton & Company took a contract to build 
a portion of the Dubuque & Sioux City 
Railroad. In iN;S the firm of Mason, Ma- 
gill, I teuton & Company built a large part 

the Minneapolis & St. Paul Railroad.. 




SAMUEL MAGILL. 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



35 



The same year the firm of Magill & Com- 
pany began business as dealers in stock, in 
addition t" their operations along mercan 
tile lines. Bach of the brothers had the 
superintendence of a certain portion of the 
business, which he successfully managed 
and thus added to the general capital. 
William and Robert had charge of the pur- 
chase of st,,ek. while Samuel and Henry 
were in control of the business in the city. 
Every dollar which they had and every acre 
of land which was purchased went into a 
common fund, and by keeping their capital 
thus united they were enabled to carry on 
business on a large scale and with greater 
prosperity. 

I'Cr some time the brothers owned but 
little land, preferring to use their capital 
in enterprises that would bring quicker re- 
turns, hut with their usual foresight they 
saw that it was only a question of time when 
DeWitt county farms would he very valu- 
able. Accordingly they bought new land 
when opportunity offered and retaining pos- 
session of these they saw some of them 
more than double in value. They owned 
several thousand acres of the finest land in 
the county, all of which is under a very 
high state of cultivation and improved with 
all the modern accessories and conveniences 
found upon a model farm. In the year [870 
Magill & Company graded the roadbed, and 
furnished and placed the ties and irons for 
the Gilman, Clinton & SpVingfield Railroad, 
from Clinton to Gilman. On the death of 
Robert Magill, in 1*74. his share of the 
property was withdrawn from the business 
for the use of his widow and children, ami 
the remaining brothers organized under the 
name of Magill Brothers. This linn also 
bad an equal interest in the banking house 
of John Warner & Company. Whatever 
they became interested in became a profit- 



able venture. Although they came to the 
west in very limited financial circumstam 

within thirty years they were wealthy men. 
having control of mammoth business inter- 
prises. The secrel of their prosperity is 
short and simple. It resulted from inde- 
fatigable and honest effort, supplemented by 
almost unerring judgment in business tran- 
sactions. They belonged to that class of 
representative American citizens, who. while 
promoting individual success, also contrib- 
ute in large measure to the general pros- 
perty and welfare, and Clinton is indebted in 
a large measure to their efforts in her be- 
half. They erected here a line three-story 
brick hotel, yet known as the Magill House, 
and they gave generously to every enter- 
prise which would benefit the city along 
material, social, educational and moral lines. 
Although they were not members of the 
\Uthodist Episcopal church they were most 
liberal contributors to the fund for the erec- 
tion of the house .if worship. While dur- 
ing their entire residence in Clinton, all the 
brothers attended and gave most liberally 
toward the erection and support of the 
Presbyterian church, of which their wives 
were active members. 

In April, [854, Samuel Magill was 
united in marriage with Miss Eleanor M. 
Seeley, a daughter of Nathan and Betsey 
(Irwin) Seeley, of Franklin county. Xew 
York. During his active business life her 
father followed farming, and after his re- 
tirement came to Clinton. While on a visit 
to our subject he died at the age of seventy- 
five years. His wife was eighty-eight \ears 
of age at the time of her death, and the re- 
mains of both were interred in Woodlawn 
cemetery. Clinton. Two children were horn 
to Mr. and Mrs. Magill, but Alfred 11.. who 
was a clerk in the Warner Rank, died at the 
age of twenty-seven years, and the daughter 



36 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



died in infancy. After the death of her 
mother. Nellie H. Magill, a daughter of Rob- 
ert, came to live with our subject, and still 
makes her heme with Mrs. Magill, to whom 
she has been more than a daughter. 

In 1855 Mr. Magill boughl the Magraw 
property at 203 West Main street, on which 
was a small frame house. This he moved 
away in [862 and erected in its place the 
large and handsome resilience which his 
widow now occupies. For many years he 
was an active member of the blue lodge, 
chapter, council and commander) of the 
Masonic fraternity, and served as treasurer 
(if the lodge for some years. IK- was alder- 
man of the city fur a time, hut never cared 

for political honors, though he always .u.ivc 
his support t" all enterprises which he he 
lieved calculated to prove of public benefit. 

When with his brothers he began hnsiness 
in Clinton, there was not a sidewalk in the 
place, but he lived t" s^e it become a flour- 
ishing town and In .re a very active part 111 
its development, lie was 11.4 only a man 
nf marked hnsiness ability, but was exceed- 
ingl) charitable and benevolent, and his 
pleasant, genial manner made for him 
many friends, wh. 1 esteemed him highly for 
his sterling worth. II is death occurred mi 
the 1 2th of November, 1883. His estimable 
wife still survives him. and is loved and es 
teemed by all who know her. 



D.W'ID BELL. 



David Bell, whose home is on section 
28, Creek township, is one of the oldest and 

best-km »wn citizens 1 if that 1< icality. I le w as 
born on the 30th of November, 1829, in 
Wayne county, < >hio, and is a son of William 
L. and Nancy Ann ( McCelvy) Bell, both of 



whom were natives of Ireland, where their 
marriage was celebrated. By trade the fa- 
ther was a weaver, and he followed that 
occupation until his emigration to America 
in [821. lie first located in Wayne county, 
( >hio, and later removed to Ashland county, 
that state, where he spent the remainder of 
his life upon a farm, his time and attention 
being devoted to agricultural pursuits. His 
wife died in 1865 at the age of sixt) one 

years, while he long survived her. passing 
away in iSSj, at the age of eighty-three 
years and si\ months, the remains of both 
being interred at Haysville, Ohio. They 
were the parents of nine children, of whom 
three died in infancy. The others were 
Samuel, now deceased; John, a resilient of 

Ashland county, Ohio; David, our subject 
Mary, wife of George McClure, of Hays- 
ville, Ohio; Joseph, deceased; and Eli, de- 
ceased, who was a member of Compan) E, 
One Hundred ami Twentieth Ohio Volun- 
teer Infantry, and took part in many en- 
gagements, including the battle of Gettys 
burg. 

Our subject began his education in the 
county of his nativity, and after the removal 
of the fannlv to Ashland county. Ohio, he 
attended school there during the winter 
months until eighteen years of age, the sum- 
mer s t -a^, ,n being devoted to work on the 
hoine farm. lie remained under the pa- 
rental roof until twenty-two. when his fa- 
ther purchased some timber land, which he 
divided among his two oldest boys, David's 
share being eighty acres, of which only three 
acres had been cleared, lie at once turned 
his attention to the improvement of his 
place, first felling the trees and then breaking 
the land, i'esides this tract of timber land, 
his entire possessions at that time consisted 
of a horse, bridle and saddle. 

After working eighteen months. Mr. 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



37 



Bell was married, June 14. 1853, to Miss 
Rebecca Messer, who was born in West- 
moreland county Pennsylvania, of which 

Mate her parent-. William and Hannah 
(McQure) Messer, were also natives, hut 
the fanner was of German and the latter of 
Irish descent. In 1833 the family removed 
to Ohio, Mrs. Bell being at that time only 
two years old. The journey was made in a 
wagon drawn by tour horses. Mr. Messer 
located in Richland county. Ohio, and pur- 
chased eighty acres of timber land, which he 
commenced to clear and cultivate, hut he 
later sold that place and bought another farm 
in the same county, though in a different 
township. Disposing of his property in 
Ohio, in [857, he came to Illinois and lo- 
cated on the farm adjoining our subject on 
the east. To the development and improve- 
ment of that place he devoted the remainder 
of his life, and erected the tine, large resi- 
dence now occupied by its present owner. 
Mr. Bennett. He died in [892, at the ripe 
old age of eighty-one years ami ten days, 
and his first wife. Mr-. Hell's mother, de- 
parted this life in November. l86r, at the 
of sixty-five, the remains of both being 
interred in the Texas town-hip cemetery. 
Unto them were horn two children, of whom 
Mrs. Bell is the older. George enlisted in 
[862 in Company F. < me Hundred and Sev- 
enth Illinois Volunteer Infantry, as a private. 
hut was later promoted to first lieutenant. 
He died in a hospital during his service and 
was buried in the soldiers' cemetery at 
Knoxville, Tennessee. For his second wife 
Mr. Messer married Mr-. Catherine I '.rod- 
wick, by whom he had one chili!. Hannah 
Catherine. Mrs. Bell was born February 
11, [831. By her marriage to qur -ubject 
-he ha- become the mother of the following 
children, namely: 1 1 ) William M.. a resi- 
dent of Lane Station, married Laura Daven- 



port and they have nine children : < iertrude, 
David T.. Frederick M.. Harry A., Anna J., 
Bessie, Telia II.. Glora and one unnamed. 

1 j 1 David E., who is now carrying on the 
home farm, wedded Mary E. Reed ami they 
have eight children. Myrtle E., Matilda R., 
Franklin E., Mary F... Ellis R., David M. 
and ( >rlando. (3) 1 Iannah A. is the wife of 
Robert Seller-, of Iowa, and they have four 
children. David 1... Herbert J.. Ruby R. ami 
one unnamed. 1 4 i James \\ '.. a resident of 
St. Louis, married Tela Caddis, and they 
have four children. Ilattie '/... Eva I... Re- 
becca M. and Horace \Y. (5) Ilattie R. is 
the wife of Richard A. Stone, of Shelby 
county. Illinois, and they have six children. 
Luther. Walter. Diamond R., Minia, Wayne 
and I lattie I'. 

The maternal grandfather of Mr-. Bell 
was George McQure, a native of Ireland, 
who came to America when sixteen years 
of age and located in Kentucky during the 
day- of Boone. His wife. Sarah Finley, was 
the daughter of a Scotchman, who settled in 
Pennsylvania at an early day. Mr-. Hell's 
grandmother <>n her father'- side was Re- 
becca Robert-, of Scotch-Irish descent. On 
both -ide- the families were strict Christian 
people, the Robert- family being of the 
Quaker faith. In neither family was there 
ever a case of insanity or suicide. While 
principally farmer-, there were many min- 
isters, physicians and merchant- among the 
male members of it. The Finley- were Cov- 
enanters and the Met lure-. Presbyterians. 
The Messers were of German origin, but the 
grandfather of Mr.-. Bell, John Messer, was 
a native of Pennsylvania, where he lived and 
died. 

At the time of his marriage Mr. Bell had 
no home to which he could take hi- bride, 
but rented a log cabin near his farm, in which 
they lived until a small frame house could be 



33 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



erected. It is still standing and was his home 
for five years while clearing and cultivating 
his farm, during which time he suffered many 
hardships and privations, tn 1857, in com- 
pany with his father-in- law he came to I >c 
Wilt county, Illinois, and being well pleased 
with the country purchased eight) acres of 
wild prairie land on section 28, Creek town- 
ship, "ii winch he raised a small crop the first 
year. In the fall after harvest, he returned 
to ( )hio, where he had left his w ife. w ho had 
seen to the planting and harvesting of a crop 
<m their Ohio farm. After spending the 
winter in that state, in the spring of [858 he 
sold hi-> propert) there and brought In- fam- 
ily to their new home in DeWitt county, Illi- 
nois. The first year the) lived in a small 
log house which Mr. Bell rented while he 
built upon his farm a dwelling sixteen feet 
square with a pantry additional. When he 
purchased the land there was not a stiek oi 
timber upon the place nor an acre under cul 
tivation. Me set out many trees, which IIOW 
throw a grateful shade about the home and 
add much to the beauty of the place. Me 
now has a nice large residence, the front 
ing thirty by eighteen feet in dimensions and 
two stories in height, while the rear is forty 
b) sixteen feet, including the original struct- 
ure. Mere he and his wife are now spend- 
ing their declining years in ease and quiet, 
enjoying a well-earned rest. have a 

nice farm of one hundred and sixty acres 
under a high state of cultivation with up-to- 
date improvements. 

Since the organization of the Republican 
party Mr. Bell has been one of its stanch 
supporters, and he has efficiently tilled the 
1 iffices 1 if n iad commissioner. t> i\\ nship tr< 
urer ami school director. Both he and his 
wife are active and faithful members oi the 
United Brethren church, of which he is now 
a trustee, and he has also served as steward. 



class leader and Sunday-school superintend- 
ent. They contributed to the erection of the 
church near their home. Center Chapel 
church, and have aided in building three 
school houses. They stand high in the com- 
munity where they have so long resided, and 
those who know them best are numbered 
among their warmest friends. 



JACOB B. HALDEMAN. 

Moii. .red and respected by all. there was 
no Hue in Clinton who pecupied a more en- 
viable position in business and financial cir- 
cles than Jacob B. Haldeman, not alone on 
account of the brilliant success he achieved, 
hut also 1. 11 account of the honorable, 
straightforward business policy he ever fol- 
lowed. ■ Me was horn in Hogestown, Cum- 
berland county, Pennsylvania, on the Kith 
of January. [826, and was a son of Jacob 
S. and \1111 1 Brandt) Haldeman, who were 
natives of Lancaster county, that state. 
After residing in Cumberland county for 
many years, the parents came to Illinois in 
[856, and spent their last days in I'.cnicnt. 
Piatt county. The father was a miller by 
occupation and came west for the purpose 
of following that vocation. < >n his arrival 
here he was not pleased with the country, 
hut our subject urged him to remain, being 
convinced that central Illinois would one 
day become the garden sp, >t of the world. 
Mis children were Jacob, l.ucetta. William, 
Fannie and 1 h trace. 

In the county of his nativity Jacob I'.. 
Haldeman was reared and educated, and 
with his father he learned the milling busi- 
ness. On first coming to Illinois, in [850, 
he followed his chosen occupation in Spring- 
field for a short time, and in Winchester 




JACOB B. HALDEMAN. 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



4i 



for about two years. He then came to Clin- 
ton, where, in company with S. R. Powell, 
he erected a mill near where the depot is 
now located, but after conducting the same 
for about two years Mr. Powell sold liis 
interest to T. C Berger, who was subse- 
quently succeeded by William Haynie. 
Under the firm name of Haldeman & Hay- 
nie they carried on business for sixteen 
years, or until [874, when Mr. Haldeman 
purchased his partner's interest, and his son 
Charles was connected with him for two 
years. From 1876 until [883 he was alone 
in business, and then sold out to his former 
partner, William Haynie, spending the re- 
mainder of his life in ease and quiet. On 
Starting out in life for himself he received 
from his father a trunk, which lie always 
kept, and seventy-five dollars in money. 
Although his capital was small he was en- 
ergetic, enterprising and progressive, and 
possessed the firm determination to succeed. 
In business affairs he steadily prospered 
through his own well-directed efforts, and 
became one of the wealthiest men of Clin- 
ton. His accumulation he invested in real 
estate, which became very valuable as time 
passed, and he became the owner of twelve 
hundred acres of tine farming land in De- 
Witt and ether counties. After retiring 
from the milling business, he devoted his 
attention t" looking after his farming and 
landed interests. In the heart of Clinton he 
owned a beautiful residence, surrounded by 
spacious grounds, which was formerly the 
Gideon home. About 1870 he erected a 

handsome house in the center of the 
grounds, facing both East Main and East 
Washington streets, and the garden he con- 
verted into an elegant lawn. 

In [854 Mr. Haldeman was united in 
marriage with Miss Catherine Onstott, of 



Waynesville, this county, who died in [870. 
Of the three children horn of this union 
both Harry and Mary died in infancy. 
Charles, the eldest, is now extensively en- 
gaged in the st,,ck business in Colony, Kan- 
sas. For his second wife Mr. Haldeman 
married Miss Mara Shurtleff, a daughter of 
Rex. \sa Shurtleff, a Methodist Episcopal 
minister of Troy, Xew York. No children 
were born of this marriage, hut they had 
an adopted daughter. Mrs. Gertrude Kelsey. 
\ficr a long, busy and useful life Mr. 
Haldeman passed away March 3, [901. 'Hie 
Republican party always found in him a 
stanch supporter of its principles, hut he 
never took a very active part in political 
affairs. ],, [885 he was elected alderman, 
and was twice re-elected to that office, 
though he cared nothing for political hon- 
ors, preferring n> give his undivided atten- 
tion to his business interests. He was a 
member of the Presbyterian church, and in 
early life was connected with the Inde- 
pendent Order of Odd Fellows. It is hut 
just and merited praise to say of Mr. Halde- 
man. that as a business man he ranked 
among the ablest; as a citizen he was hon- 
orable, prompt and true to every engage- 
ment: as a man he held the honor and es- 
teem of all classes of people, of all creeds 
and political proclivities; and as a husband 
and father he was a model worthy of imita- 
tion: unassuming in manner, sincere in 
friendship ami steadfast and unswerving in 
his loyalty to the right. His wife, who still 
survives him. is an earnest a|nd faithful 
member of the Presbyterian Church, and 
gives liberally of her time and means t, , its 
support. She is (me of those aristocratic. 
dignified ladies who are highly esteemed by 
all who know them and have main warm 
friends. 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



HENRY BELL, Deceased. 



Among the men whose lives have lefl an 
impress upon the present civilization and 
upon the development of the great Mate of 
Illinois. Henry Bell, of Clinton, Illinois, now 
deceased, stands prominent in the memory oi 
his grateful fellow townsmen. He was born 
in Pickawa) county, Ohio, on August -"5. 
[8l2, and a son of John and Sarah 1 Will- 
iams) Bell. 

Lawrence Bell, the grandfather of our 
subject, was a native of Virginia, where he 
was Imrn in 1743. He was a soldier in the 
war of the Revolution and the traditional 
familv history says that during the progress 
of the war he went home on a furlough anil 
being unable to return, his son James went 
back and served in his place until the el. ise i if 

the war. I le was selected by < ieneral Wash- 
ington as an aide and was present when 
» 1 nwallis surrendered. 

John Bell, the lather of Henry, was also 
a native of Virginia, and he served as a pri- 
vate in the war of I S 1 _• . The latter pari of 
his life wes spent in Clinton, Illinois, where 
he died in 1861, aged about seventy-seven 
years. 1 1 i- wife survived him until 1869, 
when she passed away, aged about eighty 
years. All of their ten children are now 
ceased and of diem Henry was die third in 
order of birth. The remains of both these 
aged people are interred in the cemetery 
south of Clinton. 

Henry Bell was educated in Ohio, and 
became a farmer, lie purchased a farm in 
Hancock county, that state, hut latter re- 
moved to DeWitt county. Illinois, in 1853, 
and settled in Clinton. Here he entered into 
partnership with Henry Taylor, under the 
linn name of Tax lor & Bell, dealers in dry 
goods, groceries, etc. This linn continued 
until February. 1S5K. when the store and 



contents were destroyed by fire. During 
this time -Mr. Bell had purchased land in 
Wilson township, where he moved in the 
early sixties. He continued to reside there 
until [892, when he removed to Clinton, and 
here he passed away in April. [893. 

In 1859 he invented a new and improved 
Seeding machine, the patent papers of which 
are to-daj in the possession of the family. 
Mr. Bell was no exception to the an- 
cestors of his family for when the Civil war 
broke out lie did all he could to induce them 
to let him enlist, hut at that time he was in 
poor health, and he had to remain at home. 
hut he showed his love for his mother coun 
try h\ doing all that was possible to assist in 
raising troops and caring for the ones that 
had to he lefl at home unprovided for. 

\t his death he left one hundred and 
•sixty acres of tine land in section 32, Wilson 
township, which is now owned by his chil- 
dren, and the) rent it. In Wilson township 
there was formerly a small school house 
which was called after Mr. Hell, and in it 1 
vices were held by the .Methodist denomina- 
tion, of which Mr. I '.ell was an earnest mem- 
ber. From the first he took a very active 
part in religious work and exerted himself to 
have a church erected. His labors wen -m- 
-ful and to-day upon the site of the primi- 
tive building stands a beautiful church, ap- 
propriately named. Bell Chapel. 

In 1834 Mr. Bell was united in man ii 
with Miss Rebecca Ewing, a native of Mary- 
land, ami a daughter of William and Mary 
Ewing. William Ewing was a native of 
Ireland, and his wife was born in Maryland 
where they were married. They had ten 
children and of them Mrs. Hell was the 
eighth in order of birth. To Mr. and Mis. 
Bell were horn four girls: Mary A. 
married Phillip Wolf, and they live in Clin- 
ton. Sarah C. married Thomas Dickey, who 



I 111-: BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



43 



died in 1SS0. ami lies buried at Farmer City. 
She resides in Clinton. Martha J. lives 
with Mrs. Dickey in Clinton. Alma E. mar- 
ried George Geer. and they also reside 
in Glint" in. Mrs. Bell died in [891, at the 
age "i* eighty years and lies in Wbodlawn 
cemetery by the side of her husband. 

In politics Mr. Bell was a strong sup 
porter of the Republican parly and in [856 
was a member of the first board of trustees 
of the city of Clinton, lie also served as 
collector in his township and always took an 
active and prominent part in public affairs, 
and he discharged his duties in such positions 
with sterling uprightness of purpose, win- 
ning for himself many steadfast friends who 
still mourn his loss. He was made a Mason 
in Findlay, < )hio, in 1S5 1 . 



ROBERT MAGILL. 



Holding a prominent place among the 
successful business men of Clinton in early 
days was Robert Magill. a member of the 
well-known firm of Magill Brothers, whose 
name i- inseparably connected with the de- 
velopment and prosperity of the city. He 
was born in Middlebury. Vermont, in lS,^.^. 
and was a son of Hugh ami Eliza Magill, 
who were natives of Ireland and came to the 
United State- about 1 Sid. They were the 
parents of six children, namely: William; 
Samuel; Rebecca H.. wife of ( '. II. Car- 
penter; Henry; Mary Ann. wife of Nixon 
Denton: and Robert, all of whom were born 
in Vermont. On leaving that state, in 1841, 
the family removed to Malone, New York, 
where the father owned and operated a large 
woolen mill, and also conducted a general 
Store, but his property was afterward burned 
and he lost almost everything. His s, ,ns had 



been connected with the establishment. In 
the hope of retrieving his fortune. Hugh Ma- 
gill came west in 1S51. and was soon after- 
ward joined by his family. Locating in 
Michigan City. Indiana, he took a contract 
for grading the roadbed of the Michigan 

1 aural Railn 'ail fr< mi that place to < Ihicagi ■. 

and in that undertaking was joined by his. 
s. nis. For a number of years they were en- 
gaged in railroad contracting, and after the 
removal of the family to Bloomington, Illi- 
nois, in 1853, they opened a large general 
store at that place, which was carried on by 
Samuel and Henry, while William and Rob- 
ert assisted the father in the execution of the 
contracts. 

The family came to Clinton in [854 and 
opened a store at this place, which they sold 
the following year and then bought out the 
firm of Phares & Shorer. The) also began 
dealing in stock, to which branch of their 
business Robert Magill gave his personal at- 
tention throughout the remainder of his life. 
Thep shipped stock quite extensively under 
the firm name of Magill Brothers, and con- 
ducted all business in partnership, their re- 
lations being most harmonious and pleasant, 
as well as profitable. Believing that De- 
Witt county farms would become very valu- 
able, they invested extensively in land, until 
they owned several thousand acres of the 
finest land in the county. On the death ^i 
Robert his share of the property was with- 
drawn from the business for the use of his 
w idow and children. 

Mr. Magill was fust married to Miss 
tiara Seelev, a daughter of Nathan and Bet- 
sey 1 Irwin 1 Seelev. She died, leaving one 
child. Nellie Eliza, a most accomplished 
young lady, who resides with her aunt Mrs. 
Samuel Magill, in Clinton, ami is a great 

favorite in society. She has considerable 

property in her own right, and is one of the 



44 



Till-: BIOGRAPHICAL RECOkh. 



o > workers in the Clinton library. For his 
second wife Mr. Magill married Miss Emma 
Lou I VI. and. a native of ( >hio and a daugh- 
ter of James and Emil) (Abbott) DeLand, 
who were both born in Rutland, Vermont, 
and from there removed to tin- Buckeye state. 
In early life the father was engaged in school 
teaching in Ohio, Iowa and Missouri, but 
after coming to Clinton, Illinois, in [860, 
turned his attention to stock dealing. Sub- 
sequently he was engaged in the grocer) 
business and still later in the drj goods and 
hardware business, becoming one ol Clin- 
ton's leading merchants, lie was also in- 
terested in railroad contracting, and assisted 
in organizing the National Bank of Clinton, 
of which he was a stockholder and \ 
president. As a Republican he took quite 
a prominent part in political affairs, and held 
the offices of supervisor, circuit clerk and 
mayor. He died in [896, at the age of sev- 
enty five years, and his wife in [872, at the 
age of fort) seven. Unto them were born 
five children: a son who died in infancy; 
Emma Lou, now Mrs. Magill; Mrs. John 
Day: \da M.. w ife . if VV. H. Wheeler ; John 
I'., who is represented elsewhere in this vol- 
ume; and Lillie, deceased. Mrs. Magill was 
ten years of age when she eame with her 
parents to Clinton, and was principally 
reared and educated in this city. She was 
married to our subject in [866 and has one 
son, Fred II.. who was born February 23, 
[868, and is a popular member of society in 
Clinton. He married Miss Pel Gandy, and 
to them were hern two children: Mar- 
guerite, win 1 is living : and Fred K.. who died 
in infancy. 

Mr. Magill died on the 15th of January, 
1873, leaving a large estate, sufficient to 
secure his son a place among the capitalists 
of Clinton, and give his widow a handsome 
income. She lias sold their large residence 



and farm near Clinton, and has purchased 
a handsome cottage on West Main street, 
where she now makes her home, her time be- 
ing 1 iCCUpied in 1' 'i iking after her pn iperty in- 
terests and social duties, fur which her in- 
telligence and culture qualify her. and those 
intellectual enjoyments to which her Caste 
leads. She is a member of the Presbyterian 
church, and Mr. Magill was liberal in re- 
ligious belief, and was a stanch supporter of 
the Republican party. Courteous, genial, 
well informed, alert and enterprising, he was 
one of the representative men of the county 
— a man who would have been a power in 
any community. 



WILLIAM T. TURNER. 
One oi the prosperous and highl) re 

spec ted citizens of Wilson township, I >c\\ lit 
county, Illinois, is William T. Turner, of 
section 30, and he was born on December 
28, 1841, in Logan county, Illinois, near At- 
lanta, lie was a s, ,n of Spencer and Nancy 

1 Eioblil I Turner, and Spencer was a native 

of ( ihio, as was also his wife. Spencer came 

to Illinois and settled with his father Allen on 
Salt creek, where he remained until his mar- 
riage, when he moved to (, id there 
he worked as a miner for a few years. Later 
he moved to DeWitt county and rented land 
until [858, when he purchased eighty acres 
of Walter Karr in Wilson township, on sec- 
tion it;, of which a small portion had already 
been improved. On the land a small cabin 
had been erected. Taking this land in 
charge Spencer 'Turner improved the land, 
erected a substantial house, and later in life 
purchased three lots and houses in W'apella. 
where he resided for a few years before his 
death, living retired from active business. 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



45 



III- death occurred in April. [896, when he 
was eighty-one year- of age, and his wife 
died in mno. at the age of seventy-nine, 
and both arc buried in Sugar Grove cem- 
etery. 

Thirteen children were born to Spencer 
Turner and wife, of whom the following 
named grew to maturity: Margaret J., 
who married A. II. Murphy and they live 
in Kansas; Melicent, who married F. M. 
Willis, and resides in Wapella; William T.. 
our subject; .Mary C, who married Thomas 
Livingston, and lives in Gibson City, Illi- 
nois; Nancy A., who married Avery Bay- 
ment. and lives in Champaign county, llli- 
nois; Eveline, who married James McCan- 
non, and lives in Wilson township; C. 1).. 
who resides in Iowa: Edgar 1-'.. who resides 
in Logan county. Illinois: Ella M., who mar- 
ried H. T. Jones and resides in Indianapolis, 
Indiana. 

Spencer Turner was a Democrat in Poli- 
tics, and he and his good wife were active 
members of the Christian church. During 
his long and Useful life he made many 
friends, and his good deeds live after him. 

Always a g 1 citizen, an honorable man. a 

kind father anil loving- husband, he will long 
he remembered and his name honored as a 
thoroughly representative pioneer of this 
great o iiram tnwealth. 

Our subject was educated in a log sub- 
scription school, which he attended until he 
was about eighteen years of age, during the 
winter months, and working upon the farm 

in the summer. After finishing his scl I 

life he devoted himself exclusively to farm 
life until March 3, [863, when he married 
Miss Mercy A. Bolin, a native of this coun- 
ty, and she is a daughter of Myers F. and 
Rebecca Ann (Karr) Bolin. Myers Bolin 
was a native of Delaware and his wife of 
Ohio and they settled in Wapella in [832 and 



were large land owners. The father died 
in [875 at the age of fifty-four, hut his wife 
survived him some years, dying at the 
of eighty-three. They were buried at 1 ley- 
worth. Illinois. The) were the parents of 
nine children, four of whom are now living, 
namely: William II.. who resides m Harp 
township; 1 harles. who resides in Pike coun- 
ty, Illinois: Mrs. Turner: Isaac, who res- 
in Decatur. Illiu 

When our subject settled upon his pres- 
ent farm there were no improvements, ex- 
cept that a little of the land had been broken, 
hut since he took possession of it he has 
placed all of it under cultivation and owns 
one hundred and sixty acres in section 30, 
Wilson township. Upon this tine farming 
property he has erected good outbuildings, 
a substantial barn and one of the most com- 
fortable farm houses in the county. The 
fences are well kept up and the orchard and 
shade trees in excellent condition. The en- 
tire place bespeaks the good management of 
the proprietor, while the good housekeeping 
and toothsome table demonstrate that in her 
departments Mrs. Turner is equally profi- 
cient. 

A family of nine children have been born 
to Mr. and Mrs. Turner, namely: Edgar, 
now deceased, who married and had two 
children. Nbla and l.elia: Fisher 1).. now 
deceased, who married ami had two children. 
June V. and Oliver R. ; Charles ( ).. who 
married and resides in Wayne county, Illi- 
nois, and has four children. Charles. Myrtle. 
I\a and Letie: John 1'... who married and 
resides in Wilson township, and they have 
four children. Esther E., George William, 
Floyd and Artie Ik: William T.. who resides 
in Wilson township, ami they have one 
child, Byile; Mercer F... who is at home: 
three children died in infancy. 

Mr. Turner is a Democrat and is now 



46 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



serving the township as road commissioner 
and for nine years has been justice of the 
peace. Both he and his wife are members 

of the Christian church at Long Point, in 
which lie is an elder. I le is alsi i a direct >r i if 
the Farmer's Grain, Coal & Lumber Co., of 
Wapella. Mr. Turner is a man of good ex- 
ecutive ability and early learned the lessons 
of industry and thrift. Ills propertj has 
been accumulated by legitimate husiucss 
methods, and he is justly proud of his suc- 
cess. 

• ■ » 

J. E. BELL. 

J. E. Bell, a well-known lumber dealer 
of Waynesville, is a native of [llinois, hem 
in Logan county, on the 17th of September, 
[859, and is a son of Joseph Bell, whose 
birth occurred in Virginia, in [807. I lis 
paternal grandfather, John Bell, was also a 
native of the Old Dominion, and at an earl) 
day removed from that state to Kentucky. 
where he Opened up a farm and reared his 
family. On reaching manhood, Joseph Bell 
was married in Ohio 1" Miss Maria Mi 
aels, who was born in Germany, hut spent 
her girlhood in Ohio, and they spent their 
early married life in the Buckeye state. In 
1847 Mr. Bell came t" Illinois and made a 
permanent location in Logan county. He 
had charge of the Clark ranch for eight years, 
and then purchased one hundred and sixty 
acres of land on -ccti< <n 1. Oran township, 
which he converted into a good farm. Ik- 
entered and bought other tracts from time to 
time until he had nearly three thousand a 
of land, and was successfully engaged in 
general farming and stock-raising. As a 
drover he was first interested in the stock 
business before the railroads were built 
through this section of the state, and later 



bought and shipped stock quite extensively. 

He was well known in this locality, and was 
held in high regard by his associates and 
friends. He died in 1SS7. when over eighty 
years of age. I lis wife still survives him 
and resides with her son in Waynesville. 
Unto them were horn four children, two 
sons and two daughters, of whom J. E. is 
the youngest. 

Our subject spent his early life upon the 
home farm, and was educated in the public 

schools of Logan county. <)n starting out 
in life for himself he began operating eighty 
acres of the old homestead. Ten years later 
he bought fort) acres of the place, and after 
his father's death purchased the remaining 
forty acres, anil continued to follow farming 
there until the fall of [890, when he removed 
to Midland City, DeWitl county, where he 
engaged in buying grain two years. At the 
end of that time he returned to the farm, hut 
was again engaged in the grain husmess at 
Tabor for two years, while the two succeed- 
ing seas, .us w ere dt\ 1 'ted 1. 1 the 1 iperati< m i >t 
Ins farm. On the 1 st of July. [895, Mr. 
Bell bought a half interest in the lumber 

mess at Waynesville, which he now car- 
ries on and subsequentl) became sole owner, 
lie purchased the other yard at Waynesville 
and consolidated the two. I le carries a large 
and complete stock of lumber ami builder's 
hardware, ami has built up a good trade, 
which is constantly increasing. 

Mr. Bell was married in Logan county. 
October 13. t88o, to Miss Ella Warrick, 
who was horn and reared in that county, and 
is a daughter of Charles Warrick, now a resi- 
dent of Waynesville. They have three chil- 
dren living, namely: Charles H., Edna M. 
and Marie. Mr. Bell is jusl completing a 
nice modern residence, which is one ot the 
best in Waynesville. He and his wife were 
reared in the Methodist Episcopal church 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL KF.CORD. 



47 



anil still adhere to that faith. Socially he is 
a member of Waynesville Lodge, I. O. O. 1-".. 
in which he is now serving as vice-grand, 
and his wife belongs to the Rebekah Lodj 
has rilled all its chairs and is past grand. 
Politically Mr. Bell has affiliated with the 
Democracy since he cast his first presidential 
vote for Grover Cleveland in 1884, and while 
a resident of Logan county he served one 
term as but has never been an aspir- 

ant for office. He is a straightforward and 
conscientious business man and well merits 
the respect in which he is held by his fellow 
citizens. He possesses excellent business 
and executive ability, and his sound judg- 
ment, unflagging enterprise and capable man- 
agement have brought to him sucess 



RICHARD R. BURTON. 

Among the old and honored citizens 
DeW'itt county there is none more deserving 

of mention in this volume than the gentle- 
man whose name introduces this sketch. He 
first located in this county in 183O. and here 
the greater part of his life has since been 
passed, his present home being on section 17. 
Wapella township. He was born in Logan 
county. Ohio. January 27. [827, and is a son 
of Thomas Burton, who went to that state 
when a young man and there married Mi" 
Catherine Copes, who was of German par- 
entage. The father served as a soldier in 
the war of [812, and was engaged in farm- 
ing in Logan county. Ohio, for some years 
seven of his children being born there. In 
1836 he came west by team and settled in 
Wapella township, DeW'itt township coun- 
ty. Illinois, where he resided four years. He 
then purchased a farm in Livingston county, 
where he spent the remainder of his life, dy- 



ing there about 1 S 5 5 . After his death his 
wife returned to DeWitt county to make her 
home with her children, and died here in 
1865. In the family were four sons and 
four daughters, but only our subject and his 
sister. Mr-. Sarah Jones, of Hickory county, 
Missouri, are now living. 

Richard R. Burton was the second in 
order of birth in this family, and was a lad 
of nine years on the removal of the parents 
to this state. At that time deer and other 
wild game was found in abundance, and dur- 
ing his boyhocd and youth he killed many 
deer, wild turkeys and prairie chickens, as 
well as a large number of rattlesnakes. He 
also broke many acres of virgin soil, his time 
being principally devoted to that pursuit for 
fourteen seasons. He purchased the home 
farm in Livingston county and engaged in 
its operation until his father's death. In 
1852 he went to California with ox teams, 
being six months upon the road, and spent 
one year in mining, at the end of which time 
he t< " >k passage on a vessel, and by way of 
the Panama route went to New York, whence 
he returned home, arriving there in April, 

1853- 

In 1855 we again find Mr. Burton in De- 
W'itt county. He purchased one hundred 
acres of land on section 17, Wapella town- 
ship, where he m iw resides, ah >ut f< »rty a. 
of which had been broken and a little log 
house erected thereon, and to the further im- 
manent and cultivation of this place he 
has since devoted his energ He has 

erected a g 1 set of farm buildings, has 

planted an orchard, and has added to his 
property until he now has a valuable farm of 
two hundred acres. 

In McLean county, Illinois. Mr. Burton 
was married. January 27 ■. 1855. to Miss Sa- 
mantha Adkinson, a native of Clarke county, 
Ohio. Her father, John Adkinson, was born 



4 8 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



and reared in Pennsylvania, and in Ohio 
married Elizabeth Critz, who was oi Ger- 
man birth. He died in the Buckeye state, 
and in 1836, his widow and children came to 
DeWitt county, Illinois. .Mr. and Mrs. Bur- 
ton have three children : (1) Sylvester, who 
now operates the home farm, married Aman- 
da Nichols, and they have three children, 
Carl, Jackson and Floyd. (2) Emma is 
wife of John Cunningham, of California, 
and the} also have three chilldren, Otis, 
Floyd and Clare. (3) Robert, who is also 
living on the home farm, married Jennie 
Wykles and has one son, William. 

Mr. Burton was reared a Whig, and 
since the organization of the Republican 
part) lias been one of its stanch supporters, 
but has never cared for office. In early life 
he had no educational advantages, and is 
purel) a self-made man. his success being 
due entirel) t" In- own industry, persever- 
ance and good business ability, lie is hon- 
ored and respected by all who know him. and 
is familiarly known as Dick by his many 
friends throughout the county. His esti- 
mable wife is a member of the Christian 
church. They have w itnessed almi st the en- 
tire development of this county and are de- 
serving of prominent mentii >n among its p 
neers. 



JUDGE GE< >RGE K. INGHAM 

The history of Judge Ingham is one de- 
serving of a prominent place in the annals 
of DeWitt comity, where the greater part of 

his life has been passed. The qualities of 
tin- capable lawyer, Strong in argument and 
reliable in council, are his. and his life 
record reflects credit and honor upon the 
county which has honored him by calling 
him to important judicial service. 



A native of Ohio, he was born July [9, 
[852, and is a son of Samuel Ingham. The 
ancestrj of the family may be traced back- 
to Jonathan Ingham whose parents crossed 
the Atlantic from Wales and established 
their home in the new world. Their son Jon- 
athan was a fuller by trade, following 'hat 
pursuit in order to provide for the wants of 
himself and family. In religious faith he 
was connected with the societj of Quakers 
or Friends, Me reared several sons who be- 
came prominent in their respective voca- 
tions. <hie of tlu 1 number, Samuel I). Ing- 
ham, was a member of congress and also 
served in the cabinet of Andrew Jackson as 
secretarj of the treasury. Jonathan became 
a merchant and farmer; I le/ekiah was a 
paper manufacturer; Isaiah engaged in 
farming and also conducted a tannery. H< 
was born in Bucks county. Pennsylvania, 
near \ew Hope, on the 15th of May. 1 J^v. 
and about [8l0 removed to Uoss county, 
Ohio, where he married Susan Durst, who 
was born near Charleston, West Virginia, 
daughter of Daniel and Polly Durst, who 
removed to Ohio about t8i2. They had 
but one child, Samuel Ingham, the father of 
the Judge. Vfter the mother's death the 
father was again married, his second union 
being with Elizabeth Thatcher, and they 
had three children. — John ('., Mary and 
Elizabeth. Isaiah Ingham was a prominent 
Mas. .11 and held a number of offices of pub- 
lic honor and trust discharging his duties 
with unquestioned fidelity. lie was dis- 
owned be the Society of Friends because 
he joined tin- army at the general call for 
troops needed on account of the French 
and Indian troubles in northern Ohio. 

Mr. Samuel Ingham, the father of the 
Judge, was born in Ross county, < Ihio, in 
[816 and was reared amid the wild scenes 
of the frontier. On the 28th of March, 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



5« 



]S43. lie married Miss Nancy C. King, a 
daughter of George and Elizabeth ( Nolan) 

King. The young couple began their do- 
mestic life upon a farm and for four years 
the Doctor continued its cultivation. In 
the meantime he devoted his leisure hours 
to the study of medicine and then entered 
the Physio-Medical College, of Cincinnati. 
where lie was graduated. He located for 
tne practice of medicine in Andersonville, 
Ross county. Ohio, where lie remained for 
eight years, and in [858, he removed to 
Waynesville. Illinois. Retiring from prac- 
tice he devoted his attention to the milling 
business for six years, on the expiration of 
which period he purchased a farm in Har- 
nett township, DeW'itt county, comprising 
one hundred and eighty acres. Upon this 
he made many improvements, placing the 
land under a high state of cultivation. 
Later he bought one hundred and sixty 
acres in Macon county and was actively as- 
sociated with agricultural pursuits until his 
death, which occurred in 1895. when lie was 
seventy-eight years of age. His wife passed 
away in 189 1, at the age of seventy- 
two years. They were the parents of four 
children : Alva C, a resident of Warrens- 
burg, Illinois ; Susie, who died at the age of 
sixteen years; Dora B., the wife of L. K. 
Cunningham, who lives on the old family 
homestead: and George K. 

Judge Ingham was only six years of age 
when brought by his parents to Illinois. 
and was therefore practically reared in De- 
W'itt county. After completing his prelim- 
inary education in the public schools here 
he matriculated in the Michigan State Uni- 
versity at Ann Arbor and was graduated in 
the law department with thf class of 1875. 
Returning to DeW'itt county he began prac- 
tice in Kennev, and after three years re- 
moved to Clinton, where he became asso- 



cated with William Fuller, a partnership 

which was maintained with mutual pleasure 
and profit until the death of Mr. Fuller, 
more than eleven years later. Since that 
time Mr. Ingham has been alone in the 
practice of law. He has long had a large 
clientage and has managed law business of 
an important character. His success came 
soon because his equipment was good, he 
having been a close and earnest student of 
the fundamental principles of the science of 
jurisprudence. Along with those- qualities 
indispensable to the lawyer — a keen, rapid, 
logical mind, plus the business sense, and a 
ready capacity for earnest labor, — he 
brought to the starting point of his legal 
career certain rare gifts — eloquence of lan- 
guage and a strong personality. As a re- 
sult of his success he has made some ju- 
dicious investments in real estate and is 
now the owner of some fine property in 
Clinton. 

In March. 1878. was celebrated the mar- 
riage of George K. Ingham and Miss Alice 
Tenney, a daughter of Dr. Boynti >n Ten- 
new of Waynesville. who came to DeW'itt 
county about 1846 and died over thirty 
years ago. The marriage of the Judge and 
his wife has been blessed with three chil- 
dren. Leonard, Rolla and Helen. Socially 
he is connected with the Masonic lodge and 
the Knights of Pythias society in Clinton, 
and is a popular and valued member of those 
1 irganizations. In politics he has always 
been a stalwart Republican, firm and loyal in 
his advocacy of the principles of the party. 
In 1N7N he was elected to represent his dis- 
trict in the legislature, and although one of 
the youngest members of the general as- 
sembly, being then but twenty-six years of 
age, he was recognized as a very active 
and capable member of the house. In 1X82 
he was appointed judge of the county court 



UBRAKV 

UNIVERSITY Of »JUN0O 



52 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



ni DeWitl county, to till the vacancy caused 
by the resignatii m of Judge Md iraw, and he 
discharged his duties with such "even 
handed justico" that it "won golden opin- 
ions from all sorts of people." This term 
expired December, [882. Then in [886 he 
\\a-~ elected and has since been continued 
mi the bench by the will of the people, llis 
legal learning, his analytical mind, the readi- 
ness with which he grasps the points in ar- 
gument, all combine to make him one of 
the must capable jurists that has ever s.ii 
upon the bench of DeWitt county. 



BENJAMIN MILLER. 

Benjamin Miller, deceased, was .me oi 
the wealthiest and most prominent citizens 
of Creek township. A native of Illinois, he 
was born in Morgan county, on the 27th <>i 
December, [830, and was a son of John 
and Mary (Slatten) Miller. The father 
was born in Casey county, Kentucky, in 
[799, and in early life removed to Madison 
County, this state, where he was married in 
[818. Me subsequently spent a few years 
in Morgan county, Illinois, and from there 
he came to DeWitt county. On the 2 
of January, [831, while looking up a new lo- 
cation, he entered a tract of land on section 
1. Creek township, of which si\ acres had 
been cleared, fenced and broken, and a log 
cabin, fourteen by sixteen feet, and a log 
stable, twelve by fourteen feet, erected there- 
en. lie employed men t'> break the land. 
that at the end of the first season he had 
twenty acres of land under cultivation, and 
he set mit 1 uie hundred apple trees, which 
he procured near Decatur, this being the 
first attempt to start an orchard in that lo- 



cality. A few of the trees are still standing. 
In his family were seven children, five sons 
and two daughters, of whom our subject 
is the second in order of birth. 

It was during the infancy of Benjamin 
Miller that his parents removed to Creek 
township, DeWitt county and he was still 
quite young when the family took Up their 
residence in Logan county, near the He- 
Witt county line, where he remained until 
he attained his majority, his education being 
acquired in the district schools. 

Mr. Miller was first united in marriage 
Miss Elizabeth Pledger, and they became 
the parents of live children: 1 1 ) Joseph, 
a resident of Piatt COUllty, Illinois, wedded 
Mary Flynn and has one child. Lawrence 
I'.. (2) George, a residenl of Macon coun- 
ty, married Augusta Geade and has had four 
children. Bessie, Floyd <.'., Homer II. and 
Bernard, deceased. (,}) Anna is the wife 
of James 1'ulliam of Macon county, and 
they have seven children. Samuel, who is 
married. Benjamin, Mamie. Julia. Joseph, 
James and Luther. 14) Stephen A. Doug- 
las, a resident of Macon county, married 
Anna Schuobshall, ami to them were horn 

children: William, deceased; Elizabeth; 
Benjamin; Ella and Francis Marion. (5) 
Ruth died in infancy The wife of our 
ijecl departed this life in 1865, and was 
laid to rest in Maroa cemetery. Macon 
ci lunty. 

For his second wife Mr. Miller chose 
Miss Martha I'ulliani. who was born Janu- 
ary jo. [843, near Taylorsville, Spencer 
county. Kentucky, of which state her par- 
ents, Gideon and Mary Jane (Gaoff) 1'ull- 
iam. were life-long residents. I ler father died 
when she was about live years old and her 
mother nine years later. I ler maternal grand- 
father, James 1'ulliam. was a well-known 
man in that section of the Line Grass state 



THE BIOGRAPHIC \L RECORD. 



53 



in which he lived. Mr<. Miller is the ol 
in a family of live children, the others being 
- follows: ' _• > James makes his home in 
Macon county. (3) Anna is the widow of 
G. W . Caplinger and a resident of Lincoln, 
Illinois. She has six children. Elizabeth, 
George, Lulu, Benjamin. William and Ar- 
thur. 14) Marion, a resident of Kentucky, 
married Anna Daly, of Spencer county, that 
state, and to them were horn three children: 
Martha. James and Mamie, but the last 
named and her mother are both now de- 
5 1 Mildred, deceased, was the 
wife of Fletcher Layton, who lives in Lin- 
county, Illinois. She had five 
children, two <>i whom are still living, Mary 
and Gertrude: Bert, Josephine and James 
are dece: 

Mrs. Miller grew to womanhood in the 
place of her nativity and in 1865 came to 
Illinois. 1< eating at Atlanta. L »gan county. 
where she met the man who a few months 
later became her husband, their marriage 
being celebrated December 28, [865. Four 
children blessed their union, namely: < 1 ) 
Charles Y.. born February 9, 1S1.7. resides 
on the old homestead in Creek township. 
He married Elizabeth Huffman, and they 
have six children: Mary Marie. John 
Henry. Charles Y.. Jr.. William Jennii 
Adela May and Benjamin Franklin. 
Mary, born July 2<>, 186S. wedded David 
Barclay. Jr.. an attorney-at-law in Clinton. 
who died leaving two children : Martha, who 

anied for her grandmother; and Helen, 
who is 'also named, for her grandmother 
in Scotland. For her second husband Mary 
married Fred S. Mead. 1 3 1 Elizabeth, 
born May 14. 1878, i- the wife of VV. C. 
White, a commercial traveler, and makes 
her home with her mother in Clinton. She 

one child. Marian Catherine, born Au- 
gust '•. 1898. 141 Benjamin, born April 



20, [882, i> engaged in farming in Creek 
township. 

After his marriage Mr. Miller located 
on section v ^o. Creek town-hip. where he 
purchased land which had been but slightly 
improved, but it was soon placed under a 
high state of cultivation. A large and beau- 
tiful two story frame residence, thirty by 
thirty-<i\ feet, was erected, ample barns and 
other out-buildings were also built, and trees 
set out, making it one of the best improved 
farms of its size in the locality.- With the 

istance of his estimable wife, Mr. Miller 

•lily- prospered, and at the time of his 
death was the owner of over twelve hun- 
dred acres of valuable land, which had been 
acquired throught their combined efforts. 
He died on the 11th of March. 1889, an, l 
was buried in the Maroa cemetery, where a 
fine granite monument marks his last resting 
place. Politically he was a stanch supporter 
of the Democratic party, and although he 
never cared for official honors, he was called 
upon to serve as township supervisor, and 
most capably and satisfactorily filled that 

n ion for one term. He was ever faith- 
ful to his duties in citizenship, and by the 
the ':il conduct of his farming in- 

ti rests not only promoted his individual suc- 
--. but also advanced the general prosper- 
ity. In his life span of fifty-eight years he 
accomplished much, and has left behind him 
an honorable record worthy of perpetuation. 
He was a man of the highest respectability, 
and those who were most intimately ass 
dated with him speak in unqualified terms 
of his sterling integrity, his honor in busi- 
ness, and his fidelity to all duties of public 
and private life. 

After his death Mrs. Miller carried on 
the home farm of three hundred and twenty 
acres of land in Creek township until iSo-\ 
when she removed to Clinton. She re- 



54 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



sided in that place for four years, when she 
removed to the old home farm, where she 
remained until 1899, when she again moved 
to Clinton, and has since made her home at 
No. 606 North Monroe street. She is a 
member of the First Presbyterian Church of 
that city, and takes an active interest in all 
that pertains to the church and its work. 
She is highly respected by all who know 
her, and, like her husband, has a host of 
friends throughout the county. 



HENRY A. MAGILL. 

Fortunate is the man who has hack "i 

him an ancestry honorable and distinguished 

and happy is he if Ins lines of life are casl 
in harmony therewith. In person, in tal- 
ents and in character Henry Alfred Ma- 
gill was a worthy scion <<i his race. Dis- 
tinguished for the business qualifications 
which made his father prominent and 
wealthy, of strong character and marked 
personal attributes commanding the high- 
esl respect and admiration, he spent his en- 
tire life in Clinton and was In in. .red by 
young and old, rich and poor. 

The only son of Henry and Fannie Ma- 
gill, he was horn here on the 20th of April, 
1S04. and at the usual .age entered the pub- 
lic schools, where he pursued his studies un- 
til sixteen years old. when he entered the 
dry-goods house of Magill Brothers as a 
salesman. In that way he mastered the 
business, both in principle and detail, re- 
maining there until 1 SS4. when he accepted 
a position 111 the hank conducted under the 
firm name of Warner & Company, in which 
his father was a partner. Failing health, 
however, forced him to abandon the bank- 
ing business in [893, and he was never again 



able to take up the duties of an active busi- 
ness career, although he performed many 
services for the city and tilled the position 
of chief executive of Clinton for eight con- 
secutive years. Clinton has never had a 
better mayor. He was elected to the office 
in [890 and on the expiration of the term 
had tilled the office so acceptably that he 
was re-elected and continued as mayor by 
popular vote until he had been the incum- 
bent through eight years. His administra- 
tion was businesslike, practical and progress- 
ive. He was ever on the side of progress 
and reform, ami he cooperated, in his offi- 
cial capacity, with every measure advanced 
for the general good. He never aspired to 
any other political office save that of repre- 
sentative to the general assembly, hut he 
failed to secure the nomination. He was a 
most earnest and active Republican, believ- 
ing firmly in the principles of the party and 
doing all in his power to promote its growth 
and extend its influence. His labors often. 
contributed largely to the success of his 
friends who were seeking office, and he did 
no1 hesitate to assist a capable member ol 
opposite political faith, who was seeking an 
office in which no political issue was in- 
volved. He himself had many warm friends 
in the Democracy and was always respected 
for his justice and his fearless defense ol 
his In mest com actions. 

Mr. Magill was a member of the lxnights 
of Pythias lodge in Clinton and of the Be- 
nevolent Protective ( )rder of Elks in Bloom- 
ington, while of the Clinton lire department 
he was an honorary member. The Western 
Fireman, of Chicago, in commenting on his 
death said: "Everybody who met and 
knew Harry Magill loved him. He was 
for eight years Clinton's mayor and during 
that time by his enterprise and wide-awake 
business sagacity he wrought a revolution 




HENRY A. MAGILL. 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



57 



in the town on public policy and improve- 
ment. He was most enthusiastically the 
fireman's friend, taking an active part in 
the conventions and assisting the commit- 
tees of tin.- association. He was a gentle- 
man of wealth, a good entertainer and a 
worthy, genial and constant friend." A so- 
journ in the west did not benefit the health 
of Mr. Magill, as it was hoped, and return- 
ing to Clinton he passed away March _'. 
1901. There was much in his life worthy 
of emulation. Always reliable, a man of 
earnest purpose and strong intellectuality, 
he left the impress of his individuality upon 
many lines of public progress and Clinton 
was benefitted by his experience, capability 
and public-spirited devotion. Those who 
enjoyed his friendship, and they were many, 
held him in the highest regard on account 
of his social, kindly nature, and among Clin- 
ton's native sons one of the best loved was 
I lenry A. Magill. 



WILLIAM 11. THORPE. 

One of the prominent residents of Harp 
township, DeWitt county. Illinois, is Will- 
iam II. Thorpe, of section 6, who was born 
in section 32, Wilson township, this county, 
August 9, [856, and he is a son of John and 
Betsy 1 Butterworth » Thorpe. 

The father of our subject was born in 
Lancastershire. England, as was also his wife 
(see sketch of her brother John But- 
terworth elsewhere in this work). John 
Thorpe came to America in [843 when 
a young man and settled in Massachu- 

: -. working at his calling, that of 1 
ton manufacturing, for some years. Thence 
he moved to Connecticut and then to Rhode 
Island. In [857 became to DeWitt county. 



Illinois, at the same tune as the Butterworth 
family and John Thorpe settled on eighty 

acres of land which has been purchased for 
linn by John Butterworth, the year previous, 

m Wilson township. ( )n this farm he lived 
for a few years and then traded it for an- 
other eighty acres which is now occupied by 
his son, our subject. John Thorpe also 
owned fort) acres in Wilson township, in 
section 31. The Brsl house erected on the 
farm now owned by our subject was only 
sixteen by twenty-five feet and it is now 
standing in the rear 1 if the present substantial 
Structure. This little home contained but two 
rooms beside the attic but in it the family 
were comfortable and a large number oi 

children were reared to useful maul) 1 ami 

womanhood. In politics. John Thorpe was 
a Republican and both he and his wife were 
very active members of the Methodist Prot- 
estant church in which he was a class leader. 
IT died in October, [884, and his widow 
only survived him until the following year 
when she ton died, and both are interred in 
Sugar Grove cemetery. 

To John Thorpe and wife were born ten 
children, seven of whom grew to maturity 
and six are now living, namely: Eliza, who 
married I. 1.. Hull, and they reside in W a- 
pella township; William IT. our subject; 
Emma, who married Nicholas Foley, who 
resides in Wilson township: Etta, who mar- 
ried Hammond Riley and they reside in 
Springfield, Illinois; Ida. who married Grant 
Davis and they reside in Harp township; 
Fred, who resides iii Wilson township; Ber- 
tha, w ho married Charles Morrison and they 
reside in Clintonia township. One of the 
children died in England, 

'The educational advantages of our sub- 
ject were few and \< > obtain the lntle school- 
ing offered he was obliged to walk three 

miles to school, and when one considers the 



58 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



rigor of Illinois winters in the early days 
when there were no large cities or tall build- 
ings to break the severity of the cutting 
winds and drifting sm >w s ; when the little 
children had to wade breast high through 
huge bank< of snow or take lout;- "cuts" 
through the fields, the daily tramp of six 
miles goes far to demonstrate the desire for 
learning on the part of those who endured 
such hardships. When the schoolhouse was 
reached the heating facilities were insuffi- 
cient and the appliances crude and scanty, 
and vet in spite of all this those boys and 
girls laid a Foundation upon which many 
have built up a structure of learning that has 
enabled them to take prominent places among 
intelligent people and made them known in 
connection with the world's best thought and 
action. Mr. Thorpe continued t'> attend 
sch' » >1 during the \\ inter mi mths and wi irked 
upon the farm until he was twenty one, after 
which he devoted his attention t" farming 
exclusively, remaining with his parents until 
lie was twenty-three. 

At that age. >>n .March 23, [880, he was 
married to Miss Martha Rolofson, and she 
is a daughter of John B. and Mary Rolofson. 
After his marriage he resided in 1 [arp town- 
ship on rented land until, in [894, he pur 
chased bis father's place of eight) acres and 
upon this he built a line, large two-Story 
house and a good barn thirty-two by thirty- 
six feet. He also owns forty acres in Wil- 
son township and rents other land in addi- 
tion. In addition to his fanning interests 
Mr. Thorpe is president of the Farmers' 
('.rain. Coal and Lumber Co., of Wapella, 
and under his wise management and execu- 
tive ability this concern has rapidly de- 
veloped into one of the prominent houses in 
the commercial life of that town and netted 
excellent profits to the stockholders. 

Three children have been born to Mr. 



and Mrs. Thorpe, namely: Ralph Wayne, 
who was born June 26, 1881, is now at- 
tending the Northern Normal School at 
Dixon, Illinois. During the taking of the 
census in Kjoo, he served most acceptably as 
enumerator of Harp township. Mary Eus 
nice, who was born June to. 1SS5, died at 
the age of three years, three months and one 
day. John William Thornton, who was born 
April -'7. [893, is attending the district 
school. In politics Mr. Thorpe is a Repub- 
lican and has served the township as road 
commissioner. Both Mr. and Mrs. Thorpe 
are active members 1 if the Christian church 
at Wapella. Mr. Thorpe is a man who finds 
his greatest enjoyment in the companionship 
of his family ami friends and is widely re- 
spected and esteemed. 



ANDREW ALLAN - . 



Among the many prominent and enter- 
prising men who have helped to raise the 
state of Illinois t" its proud prestige as .me 
of the most prolific agricultural regions of 
the Union is Andrew Allan, a Scotchman by 
birth, training and characteristics, an Amer- 
ican b\ adoption, assimilation and adaptabil- 
ity, an agriculturist and resident of Weldon, 
and a citizen whose success is limited only by 
his years of activity. A native of Ayrshire, 
Scotland, home of the immortal I '.urns, lie 
was born December 27, [830, a son of 
Thomas and Grace (Stirling) Allan, who 
came to America in [858 and located in Ran- 
dolph county, Illinois. The parents re- 
moved in [867, to Nixon township. DeWitt 
county, Illinois, ami purchased a tract ol 
eighty acres of land with growing crops for 
twenty-five dollars an acre, the proceeds 
from the crops practically paying for the 



THE BIOGkAl'IIh \\L RECORD. 



59 



land at the end of four months. The) con- 
tinued to live in DeWitt county until the 
death of the father September [8, 1S7J. ( if 
the children in the family. Grace, who is the 
wife of Alexander Brown, lives in Randolph 
county, as does also William and James 
Allan, while David and Alexander live in 
Nixon township. Thomas, who is a bach- 
elor, li\e> in Scotland, frequently visits his 
people in Illinois, and has crossed the At- 
lanta twenty-six times for that purpose. The 
maternal grandfather of the children. Alex- 
ander Stirling, was a farmer of Ayrshire. 
Scotland, and was prominent in affairs of the 
Presbyterian church, in which he was an 
elder. 

It may he said that Andrew Allan was 
reared by his grandfather, with whom he was 
a special favorite, and he received a liheral 
and practical education in the public schools. 
At the age of seventeen he located at Bridge- 
water, England, ami for nearly twenty year- 
was engaged in the dry-goods business with 
great success, and during this time he made 
frequent trips to America to visit his people 
and naturally became interested in the pros- 
perous conditions there prevailing. On 
different occasions he purchased property in 
Nixon township, and finally, when his inter- 
ests in Illinois became greater than those in 
England, he decided to locate in the midst ot 
the greater responsibilities, and took up his 
resilience in Nixon township, DeWitt coun- 
ty, in [883. Since then he has been f( >remi >st 
in agricultural matters, and owns six farms 
Comprising the best land in Nixon township. 
aggregating eight hundred and twenty acres 
in all. I le also owns a farm of one hundred 
and sixty acres in DeW'itt township, and a 
farm of eighty acres in Willow Branch town- 
ship. I'iatt county. for six years of his 
residence in Illinois he engaged in the 1 
and lumber business at Weldon, and retired 



from the same in the fall of [901. His 
splendid and systematic management of his 

affairs allows of considerable leisure on his 
part, and as a reward for his ability and hard 
work he travels much, and observes keenly 
and intelligently. for several years he has 
escaped the biting Masts of Illinois winters 
by going to the salubrious climate of the 
Gulf of Mexico, in the vicinity of New < lr 
leans, and he also spent one season in • >kla- 
lioma. 

The first marriage of Mr. Allan was sol- 
emnized in [866, with Caroline Denhem, of 
Langport, Somersetshire. England, and who 
died April [8, (895. A second marriage was 
contracted May 12. [896, with Charity, 
daughter of Robert and Eliza (Walker) 
Flood, early settlers of this county. Mrs. 
Allan is a native of DeW'itt county, and for 
fourteen years previous to her marriage was 
engaged in educational work. She is a mosl 
refined and cultured woman, and is promi- 
nent in the affairs of the Methodist Protest- 
ant church, of Weldon. Mr. Allan is a Pres- 
byterian in religious belief, although he is an 
attendant and supporter of the Methodist 
1'iotestant church. In national politics he 
is Independent. 



ELBERT If LANE. 



< )no of the line properties of DeWitt 
count) is the farm of Elbert D. Lane, locat- 
ed on section 23, Texas township. Here is 
a tine rural home, well tilled acres, abundant 
harvests and all modern equipments for suc- 
cessfully and scientifically carrying forward 
the work of fanning and stock raising. 
Upon the meadows graze large numbers of 
stock, line cattle and thoroughbred hoi 
including heavy draft horses, and the place 






6o 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



has an air of neatness and thrift compatable 
with good judgment and excellent manage- 
ment. 

A son of the state which has yielded him 
such profitable returns for labor invested, 
Mr. Lane was born at Long Point, DeWiti 
county. Illinois. October .}. [837, and is 
therefore one of the pioneers of this section 
of the state. His parents, William and Ella 
( Maxwell 1 Lane, were natives, respectively, 
of North and South Carolina, and the father 
came at an early day from Kentucky, and 
settled near Long Point, DeW'itt county. Illi- 
nois. As a preliminary to an extended farm- 
ing experience in his adopted county he 
erected a little log cabin upon the. eighty 
acres of land which he entered, and to which 
was later added twenty acres of timber land. 
For many years he successfully tilled his 
land and became a permanent fixture oi the 
community. However, he eventually re- 
moved to the town of Clinton, where he died 
at the age of fifty-nine years, his wife sur- 
viving him for five years, lie was a Demo- 
crat in politics, and was a member of the 
Christian church, as were his four children. 
two of whom are now living, and his wife. 

In the public schools ,,f DeW'itt county, 
Elbert D. Cane acquired the average educa- 
tion of the farmer boys of his neighborhood, 
following which he worked by the month 
for a number of years. About [876 he rent- 
ed land from C. II. .Mo. .re. and he still con- 
tinues to reside on the Moore property, 
which consists of two hundred and forty 
acres. April 14. 1S5S. he married Rosalie 
Percv, daughter of Silvanus and Anna ( Bel- 
lows ) Percy. Mrs. Lane is a native of 
Ohio, and her father was horn in Vermont, 
and removed to DeW'itt county in 1857, 
where he retired from his occupation of 
farming and settled in Clinton. To Mr. and 
Mrs. Lane have-been born the following chil- 



dren: Martha, who is deceased; William 
Alvus; James Alvin, who is a twin to 
William Alvus, and lives on a farm in Piatt 
county; Edward, who is living in DeW'itt 
county; Kate, who makes her home with her 
parents; and Elbert, who is a farmer in Clin- 
tonia township, DeW'itt county. Three chil- 
dren died in infancy. Mr. Cane cast his fust 
presidential vote for Abraham Lincoln, and 
has since voted independently, although he is 
in favor of free silver, lie is a member of 
the Christian church, as are his wife ami 
daughter. When her sister's child, Miss 
Maude Bell, was four years of age, Mrs. 
Lane received her into the family, and since 
that time she has continued to reside with 
them. 



ORANGE L. KIRK. 



Orange L. Kirk, deceased, was for 
many years one of the representative busi- 
ness men anil prominent citizens of Clinton, 
lie was a native of Ohio, born in Xenia, 
November 1 1, [829, and was a son of Sam- 
uel and Elizabeth (Marshall) Kirk, who 
were farming people. The father was a 
middle aged man at the time of his death, 
which occurred mi his farm near Logans- 
port, Indiana, but the mother was only 
about twenty-one years old when she died. 
leaving two small children: Orange L. and 
Angeline, who subsequently became the 
wife of William Duvall. The father was 
twice married and had children by his sec- 
ond union. 

Our subject was reared on the home 
farm and when a young man learned brick 
manufacturing and brick building at Xenia. 
Later he engaged in contracting and build- 
ing at Bellefontaine, Ohio. In 1854 he 




O. L. KIRK. 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



63 



came to Clinton, Illinois, and was one of 
the pioneer contractors and builders, if not 
the first, at this place. At thai time Clin- 
ton was only a small town composed of log 
and frame buildings, hut he lived to see it 
develop into a fine modern city, containing 
many handsome brick structures, which still 
stand as monuments to his architectural 
skill. He owned and carried on a brick- 
yard "n the outskirts of the city, and dur- 
ing- his early residence here was connected 
with A. H. C. Barber in manufacturing and 
contract work until 1871. He was subse- 
quently in partnership with J. W. Bell and 
still later with his son. James M. Kirk, who 
is one of the most prominent builders of the 
city to-day. Our subject built all of the 
early brick buildings on the square, includ- 
ing the Magill Block and Hotel, the Union 
and Masonic Blocks, and the old First 
Presbyterian church, besides many private 
residences throughout the city. Mr. Kirk 
also engaged in the manufacture of tile for 
a time, and when the Springfield division 
of the Illinois Central Railroad was being 
built, he received the contract to build all 
the culverts from Oilman to Springfield. 
He laid the first sewers from the Magill 
House ea<t and south. The large brick resi- 
dence now occupied by his widow was built 
by him. and he erected the houses belonging 
to T. K. Edministon, I'. McHenry, \. 
Sacket and Mrs. 0"Brien. Besides the busi- 
ness houses already mentioned he built the 
Kellough, M. Moran and Day blocks, and 
for many years was the leading brick masi in 
and contractor of the city. 

Mr. Kirk was twice married, his first 
wife being Miss Sarah J. Robinson, who 
died in 1X54. leaving two children. James 
M., who is represented on another page of 
this volume; and Samuel. On the iSth of 
February. 1857, Mr. Kirk was united in 



marriage with Miss Lueretia G. Morlan, a 
native of London, Ohio, and a daughter of 
John ( i. and Lueretia (Gager) Morlan. 
The father was born in Pennsylvania, and 
in early life went to 1 >hio, from which state 
he came to DeWitt county. Illinois, about 
[852. Here lie followed his trade of 
wagonmaker, his first shop being located on 
the site of Frank Palmer's livery stable, but 
the building has since been moved west and 
is now used as a poultry warehouse. He 
engaged in the manufacture of light and 
heavy wagons, and his work being of the 
best, many of his wagons are still in use. 
He patented the Morlan fifth wheel used on 
wagons to prevent the vehicle from over- 
turning. During his early residence here he 
took quite an active part in public affairs 
ami served as marshal of the city for a time. 
llis old home is now owned by Leon Kirk, 
a.son of our subject. Mr. Morlan died in 
1892. aged eighty-three years, and his wife 
in 1890, aged eighty-four. They were the 
parents of two children: Lueretia. now 
Mrs. Kirk: and John A., a resident of 
Bloomington, Mini 'is. 

By his second marriage Mr. Kirk had 
the following children: (1) Thaddeus 
learned the brick mason's trade with his fa- 
ther, but later took up the study of medi- 
cine with Dr. D. W. Edministon, of Clin- 
ton, and was graduated at Rush Medical 
College. Chicago, with the degree of M. I >. 
He then located at St. lames. Minnesota. 
where he built up a large practice. He died 
very suddenly January 4. [890. Socially he 
was a prominent member of the Masonic 
bodies, lie married Annie Clinton and had 
oik- chiltl. now deceased. ( _• ) \ngelinc is 
the wife of James Dale, of Clinton, and 
they have two children living, Nora, wife 
of c. s. Cassidy, and Irene. Those de- 
ceased are Wilbur and James M. (3) 



6 4 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



Frank and 14) Olive were twins. The lat- 
ter is deceased. Frank, a contractor of St. 
Li mis, married Dilemma Bail and has three 
children: Annie L, Walter and Charles. 
(5) Lucretia is the wife of A. M. Hatfield, 
of Clinton, and the children born to them 
were Elmer and Frank, both living; and 
George and an infant daughter, both de- 
ceased. (6) Minnie is deceased. 17) Al- 
lien 1... station agent at Vandalia, Illinois, 
married Stella Dickinson and they have 
three children: Clyde. Lloyd and Pauline. 
(8) George is an engineer residing at home. 
(i)i Leon, a bookkeeper in Clinton, married 
Alice M. Wilson, and they have three chil- 
dren: Odell I... Harriet 1.. and Carl I.. 
1 ml Edna died young. 1 11 ) William i- a 
railroad brakeman. ( 1 _• 1 Harry Y. is a 
boiler maker. 

During his boyhood Mr. Kirk united 
with the Methodist Episcopal church, and 
was throughout lite an active and faithful 
member, and served in various church of- 
fices. He did much fm- the cause of temper- 
ance, and was elected councilman mi the 
anti-license ticket several years. On the 
Kith of 1 (ctober, [860, he was made a Ma- 
son, and was ever afterward a consistent 
member of that body, following closely its 
precepts, ami serving as tyler of the lodge 
thirteen years. He died October 11. [897, 
and his death was widely and deeply 
mourned, fur he was a man of many ster- 
ling traits of character, who had a host of 
warm friends and was highly respected and 
esteemed by all who knew him. 



J( IHN F. DE LAND. 

James F. l)e Land, the well-known and 
popular cashier of the National Hank of 
Clinton, Illinois, was horn in that city mi 



the 27th of Decemher, 1861, and has been 
prominently identified with her financial in- 
terests since reaching manhood. His fa- 
ther. James De Land, was born in West Rut- 
land. Vermont, and was reared and educated 
in that state. Coming west, he was engaged 
in school teaching in Ohio. Iowa and Mis- 
souri until [860, when he removed to Clin- 
ton, Illinois, and turned his attention to 
stock-dealing, handling and shipping all 
kinds of stock. In [869 he opened a grocery 
stoic where Xicoli is now located and built 
what is now known as the Opera House 
block, but was first used as a town hall. Sub- 
sequently he was engaged in the dry-g Is 

business, and was also interested in the hard- 
ware trade for many years, becoming one of 
Clinton's leading merchants. He did rail- 
road contracting for a time, and in connec- 
tion with Colonel Suell Thomas and others 
organized the National Bank of Clinton, of 
which he was a stockholder and vice-presi- 
dent. He was a capable financier and was 
one of the ablest business men of the city. 
Politically he always affiliated with the Re- 
publican party, and took a very active and 
influential part in public affairs. He filled 
the office of supervisor and circuit clerk, and 
also served as mayor from t88l to [883. 
Mr. De Land was instrumental ill buying 
and locating the DeWitt county farm, and 

assisted in establishing the W llawn 

cemetery. I le died in [896, at the age 1 if se\ - 
enty-five years, honored ami respected by all 
who knew him. His wife, who bore the 
maiden name of Emily Abbott, passed away 
in 1872, at the age of forty-nine. They had 
five children: a son. who died in infancy; 
Emma Lou. widow of Robert Magill; Ada 
M.. wife of W. H. Wheeler: John I-"., our 
subject: and Lillie. deceased. 

1 taring his boyhood John F. ])e Land at- 
tended the public schools of Clinton, and 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



65 



completed His education at the high school of 
Brandon, Vermont. He served as deputy 

circuit clerk under his father until i. v - 
when he entered the National Bank of Clin- 
ton as bookkeeper; was later promoted to 
- stant cashier, and in 1 S«>'< was made cash- 
ier, lie is also a stockholder and director 
of the hank, and is regarded as one of the 
most reliable business men of the city. 

In [883 Mr. De Land was united in mar- 
riage with Miss Belle Wolf. Her father. 
Philip Wolf, a retired citizen of Clinton, was 
horn in Bellefontaine, Logan county. Ohio, 
June i_\ 1834, and is a son of John B. Wolf, 
who was horn in Lancaster, Pennsylvania, 
hut was reared in Ohio, and in 1S47 came to 
DeWitt county. Illinois. He tir-t located in 
Tunbridge township, hut in 1853 sold his 
farm and removed to Clinton, where he en- 
gaged in the lumber business. Here he died 
in 1868, at the age of sixty-four years. He 
married Rebecca Stout, of < )hio, who died at 
the age of eighty years. Their children were 
Elizabeth. Lydia. Philip, Margaret. Ruzella, 
Joseph, Mary. John and Catherine. Philip 
Wolf spent his early life upon a farm, and 
was then engaged in the dry-goods business 
in Clinton with E. W. Taylor, and still later 
in the implement and hardware business with 
J. W. Bell, and later on with A. I). Mo- 
Henry. He built the block now occupied by 
the hardware firm 1 f Bailor & Bryant : erect- 
ed a number of houses and owns consider- 
able farm property in this county. Having 
accumulated a comfortable property, he 
now living a retired life, enjoying the fruits 
of former toil, and is one of the most highly 
esteemed citizens of Clinton, lie wedded 
Miss Mary, daughter of Henry Bell, an early 
settler of this county, and to them were born 
three children: I.ura. wife of Rev. E. A. 
Hamilton ; Annie, wife of J. R. Huston; and 
Belle, wife of our subject. In politics Mr. 



Wolf is a Republican, and in hi- social rela- 
tions is a member of the Masonic order. 
Unto Mr. and Mrs. De Land was horn only 
one child. Lota, w hod ied in iv«»o. at the age 
of fifteen year-. She was an exceptionally 
bright, accomplished girl, very refined in 
manner, and her death was a se\ ere blow, not 
only to her parent-, hut to her many friend-. 
The Republican party has always found 
in Mr. De Land a stanch supporter of it- 
principle-. He tilled the office of city tr< 
urer two year-, hut has never cared for po- 
litical honors. He is a member of the 
Knights of Pythias Lodge and the Methodist 
Episcopal church. His father was also con- 
nected with that church, and was an ( >dd 
Fellow and Royal Arch Mason. In manner 
our subject is pleasant and social, and all 
who know him esteem him highly for his 
genuine worth. 



MRS. CATHERINE SWIGART. 

Mrs. Catherine Swigart, one of Farmer 
City's most esteemed ladies, has the distinc- 
tion of being the first white child horn in 
Santa Anna township. DeWitt county, the 
date of her birth being July i(>. [832. Her 
parents were Dennis and Mary (Council) 
Hurley, who were the first to settle in this 
locality, and were prominently identified 
with its early development and prosperity. 
A -ketch of these worthy pioneers i- given 
in connection with that of Mrs. Lydia M. 
Johnson, on another page of this volume. 

Mrs. Swigart was horn in the first hi 
built in the northeast part of the county, it 
being a primitive structure, not more than 
fifteen by sixteen feet in dimensions, con- 
structed of split logs, with a puncheon floor, 
one window and one door, hut it furnished 



66 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



a home of comfort to a large family until 
better accommodations could he secured. 
Our subject was reared on a farm, and being 
.a strong, ambitious girl, she assisted in the 
work of both the house and the field, willing 
always to help her father as well as her 
mother. 

On the nth of March. [852, she was 
united in marriage with George Washing- 
ton Swigart. who was born in Marion coun- 
ty, Ohio. April 9, 1830, and was a son of 
Daniel Swigart. lie obtained a fair educa- 
tion in a little log school house, and in early 
life engaged in cattle feeding and working 
by the month as a farm hand. In [849 he 
came with his parents to 1 >eWitt county. I le 
was in limited circumstances at the time ol 
his marriage, and while the railroad was be- 
ing built through this section of the state 
he worked on it. while his wife kept boarders 
in a little shanty of one room, usually accom- 
modating about fourteen for meals. She 
made beds on the floor and Cooked over a 
fireplace out doors, doing all her baking in 
a covered skillet. Hue summer was passed 
in tins way. and at the end (if that time the 
vomig couple had saved fifty dollars. Bor- 
rowing one hundred dollars they entered 
eight) acres of land, which is now owned by 
Mr. McConkey.and upon the place they built 
a cabin of split logs, with a mud and stick 
chimney. Although it was a rude structure, 
it was their first home and they were happy 
in the possession of the same. In those early 
davs Mr. Swigart often remarked to his wife 
"some day you will have a tine home, ol 
which you are certainly deserving." While 
he engaged in the improvement and cultiva- 
tion of the land she cooked the meals for 
the harvest hands and carried water to 
quench their thirst. In 186(1 they sold their 
first farm and bought the Chapin place of 
three hundred acres, a part of which he sub- 



sequently sold, retaining one hundred and 
twenty acres. He then purchased thirty-six 
acres of the T. Gardner farm, where Mrs. 
Swigart now resides in a large new resi- 
dence, the barns and outbuildings being in 
perfect harmony therewith. 

Mr. and Mrs. Swigart bad no children 
of their own. but they reared Sarah F. 
Hedge, who was horn in 1857 and died in 
1S77. She married Charles Everett, and at 
her death left two children: Mory, who 
married Gertie Lewis and has one son. ( )r- 
ville L.; and Sherman, who is now in the 
Philippines. Mrs. Swigart cared for these 
children, carefully rearing and educating 
them. 

In religious belief Mr. Swigart was a 
(Jniversalist, and in politics was a Republi- 
can, lie served as road commissioner for 
nine years, but never sought political honors. 
I le was a n< 'hie man. line 1' 11 iking and 1< i\ ed 
by all. and in his death, which occurred 
March 2, [890, the community realized that 
it had lost one of its most valued and useful 
citizens. I lis estimable wife still resides at 
their beautiful home in Farmer City, sur- 
rounded by all the comforts that make life 
worth the living. She is a typical pioneer 
woman, kind hearted and generous, and is 
held in the highest regard by all who know 
her. 



ARTHUR I". MILLER. 

Arthur F. Miller is one of the youngest 
members of the Clinton bar. but his promi- 
nence is by no means measured by his years, 
on the contrary he has won a reputation 
which many an older practitioner might well 
envy and is now creditably serving as state's 
attorney, being elected to that office on the 
Republican ticket in 1900. as a successor to 
John Fuller. 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



67 



Mr. Miller was r> irn in Holliston, Massa- 
chusetts, March u. 1S7J. and is a repre- 
sentative of a good old New England family. 
His father, Possidonius Miller, was a na- 
tive of Vermont, and was a direct dscendant 
■ if an old colonial family, as his grandfather, 
Ferdinand Miller, was a memher of the 
"Boston Tea Tarty.'" He was also a native 
of Vermont By vocation the father of our 
subject was a journalist and for a nnmher 
<>f years was engaged in that profession. 
He married Miss Agnes Dillon, who was 
Inirn in Nova Scotia, hut came with her par- 
ents to the old Bay state when three years 
old. She is still living and resides at Cottage 
City, on the island of Martha's Vineyard. 
Her people were farmers by occupation. By 
her marriage with Mr. Miller she became the 
mother of three children, a- follow-: Celia. 
who died in infancy; Albert F.. who died at 
the age of nine years; and Arthur F.. our 
subject. 

Arthur F. Miller was educated at Trin- 
ity College, in Hartford. Connecticut, where 
he was graduated in 1895. Coming west he 
took up the study of law under Judge T. H. 
Dillon, of Petersburg. Indiana, and was ad- 
mitted to the bar of Illinois in 1897. In 
October of that year he located in Clinton 
and opened an office. His faithful attention 
to his profession soon won the attention of 
the public, who recognized in him a fitting 
candidate for the office which he now fills, 
and he was accordingly nominated and elect- 
ed in 1900. In the discharge of his official 
duties he has given the utmost satisfaction, 
and in his private practice he faithfully and 
conscientiously looks after the interests of 
his clients. 

In July. 1895, he was united in marriage 
with Miss Rovenia Fosnaugh, daughter of 
J. A. Fosnaugh, one of Clinton's leading 
merchants. An extended sketch of the Fos- 



naugh family will be found on another page 
of this volume. Socially Mr. Miller 1- a 
member of the Masonic fraternity, the 
Knights of Pythias, the Knights of the Mac- 
cabees and the Mutual Protective League. 
He is a pleasant, genial gentleman, who 
makes many friends, and is held in high re- 
gard by all who know him. 



JOHN SHUE. 

John Shue. deceased, was for many years 
one of the leading farmers of Wilson town- 
ship, ami was a man highly respected and 
esteemed by all who knew him. He was 
born in Perry county. Ohio, on the 5th of 
February. 1833, an '' was a son "' Gottlieb 
and Nancy Ann 1 Franklin) Shue. His ma- 
ternal grandfather was a cousin of Benjamin 
Franklin. The father of our subject was a 
native of Germany and was a lad of fourteen 
years when he came to America with his 
parent-, who settled near Philadelphia. 
Pennsylvania, and spent the remainder of 
their lives there. Leaving home. Gottlieb 
Shue went to Ohio at an early day. and was 
engaged in tailoring in Perry county until 
1872, when he came to DeWitt county. Illi- 
nois, to make his home with our subject. 
Here he died March. 1X70, at the age of 
eighty-three years, and his wife passed away 
March. 1S70. at the age of eighty-two. Of 
their eight children only two are now liv- 
ing, namely: Caroline, wife of Joshua 
Pyles, of DeWitt, Illinois, and Harriet, 
widow of Thomas Sadler. 

John Shue. of this sketch, was reared 
and educated in the county of his nativity, 
and remained at home until twenty-live years 
of age. aiding in the work of the farm. In 
1858 he removed to Bloomington, lllii 



68 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



and on the 3d of June, that year, was united 
in marriage with .Miss Sarah Michael, who 
was born in Darke county. Ohio, September 
28, 1839, a daughter of Samuel and Barbara 
( Putterbaugh) Michael, also natives of the 
Buckeye state. Her paternal grandparents 
were William and Margaret (Durlinger) 
Michael, the former a native of Germany, 
the latter of Ohio. William Michael was 
horn in 1750. and came to this country at 
the age of five years. IK- entered the Con- 
tinental army during the Revolutionary war. 
together with m\ snib. all of whom were 
killed in the service, he alone surviving. 
Mrs. Shue is one of a family of eight chil- 
li, and has two brothers living, namely: 
Christopher, a resident of Harp township; 
and William, of Kansas. 

The children bom to Mr. and Mi's. Shue 
are a> follows: 1 1 ) Austin R. is sheriff of 
DeWitl county, whose sketch appears on an- 
other page of this volume. 1 _• I Mary i- the 
wife of Wilbur Wilson, of Harp township, 
and they have one child, Fay. (3) John \. 
Logan, deceased, married Lull) Hall, who is 
now living in Lansing, Michigan. 1 |i 
Ulysses, who is now operating the home 
farm for his mother, married Minnie Hoots, 
who died leaving one child, Cecil. (5) Ed- 
ward, a resident of Harp township, married 
Minnie Page and has one child. Garrett. 
101 Ella, deceased, was the wife of Bayard 
S. Griffith, of Clinton, and she left two chil- 
dren. Dexter 11. and Wayne. 171 Almeda 
is the wife <>\ Tony Moore, of Harp town- 
ship, and they have two children. Bliss and 
Opal. iSi Frederick married Mayme Polan 
and lives in Bloomington, Illinois. 

\fter his marriage Mr. Shue made his 
home in Bloomington, working at any- 
thing which he could find to do until [867, 
when he removed to Harp township, De- 
Witt county, and purchased eighty acres ^i 



land on sections S and 17. which at that time 
was all wild and unimproved, lie built a 
house, barn and fences, which are still stand- 
ing, hut after residing there for five years 
he sold the place and bought an improved 
farm of one hundred and twenty acres in 
Wilson township. He soon afterward sold 
fifteen acres of this, hut the remaining one 
hundred and live is still owned by his widow 
and is under a high state of cultivation. 
Throughout his life he followed farming 
verj successfully and became quite well-to- 
do. In politics he was an ardent Republi- 
can, but never cared for public office, pre- 
ferring to give his undivided attention to 
his farming interests. Hediedin [892, hon- 
ored and respected by all who knew him. and 
was laid to rest in Woodlawn cemetery, Clin- 
ton. In his death the community lost one of 
its best citizens, his neighbors a faithful 
friend, and his family a considerate husband 
and father. 



DAA ID SCHENCK. 

Of Holland ancestry. Mr. Schenck has 
applied his admirable national characteristics 
to the management of his farming interests 
in Macon and DeWitt counties, and as a re- 
sult has made a distinct success of his ch< sen 

lipation. lie is thorough in his work. 
conservative and sure in the manner of bis 
improvements, and studies farming from a 
scientific standpoint. For the first land pur- 
chased be paid fifteen dollars per acre, and 
for the last eighty dollars per acre, and 
he now owns five hundred and eighty a> 
of land, one hundred and fifty of which 
is in Macon county, and the remainder 
in DeWitt county. lie is the possessor 
of a quarter section in Rice county. Kan- 
sas, and the same amount in Hayes conn- 



THE I'.loCRAl'HICAI. RECORD. 



69 



t\. Nebraska, the former property being 
under a high state of cultivation. As early 
as 1S54 he became identified with DeWitt 
county, at which time he purchased sixty 
acres of land in Texas township, and forty 
acres across the road in Macon county, 
most of which was broken, and on which 
there were four log cabins. He built a la 
and substantial house in [868, planted the 
many trees which now have a venerable ap- 
pearance, ami which yield a sweeping shade 
in the heat of the summer, and has since eli- 
ded in general farming and stock-raising. 
And during the intervening years he has in 
no wise forfeited the tine and high regard 
in which lie is held by all who know him. 
ami value his friendship and his service in 
behalf of the locality of which he is a resi- 
dent. 

Many years ago the paternal grandfa- 
ther, ('.arret J. Schenck, emigrated from the 
home of his forefathers in Holland, and 
tied in Xew Jersey, .Monmouth county, after- 
wards removing to Ohio, where his death 
ntually occurred, lie farmed success- 
fully in Warren county, and accumulated 
quite a store of worldly possessions during 
his pilgrimage on earth, and was generally 
conceded to have lived a worth-while ami 
useful life. 1IU grandson, David, was born 
in Butlei county. Ohio, October 8, [825, a 
son of John and Catherine (Cooper) 
Schenck. natives of Xew Jersey. The par- 
ents were farmers and both died at the home 
place in ' >hio, and were the parents of three 
children, two of whom are living. David 
Schenck was educated in the public schi 

I >hio, and assisted his father in conduct- 
ing the farm. When almost a grown boy 
he learned the blacksmith's trade, and in 
1854, as heretofore stated, came to this 
county. 

January 14. 1N47. in Ohio. Mr. Schenck 



married lluldah Long, daughter of Silas and 
Sally 1 Marshall) Long, natives of Ohio. 
Mrs. Schenck. who died in Illinois August 
1,?. [893, was the mother of six children, 
four of whom are now living: Catherine, 
who is the wife of William Sloutenborough, 
living in retirement at Maroa; Sarah, who 
died in Ohio at the age of one year; Ann 
Eliza, who is li villi; at home: Ella, who was 
honi in ( )hi... and died at the age of twelve 
years; Alice, who is the wife of Charles 
Melnes. a farmer of Macon .county; and 
Silas ].. who is a farmer of Macon county, 
is married and has two children. Edith and 
Lydia. Mr. Schenck is a self-made man in 
the highest s t -ns C of the word, ami is indebt- 
ed to no good fortune for his rise in life. 
lie is a moral and progressive force in the 
community, and enjoys the esteem of all his 
fellow townsmen. With his wife he is a 
member ami worker in the Christian church. 
In politics our subject is a Democrat, and 
for four yeai 1 as justice of the peace, 

hut with the exception of school director he 
has not cared to accept office. 



!< (MAS CORWIN BYLAND. 

Thomas Corwin Byland, educator ami 
carriage maker, and a resident of VVeldon 
since 1876, was bom near Circleville, 
Pickaway county. Ohio, December j'l. 
1852. I lis parents. Amos and Mary (John- 
s. .11 1 I '.viand, were also natives of < >hio, ami 
farmers by occupation, the father dying in 
Ohio in 1855. The ancestrj is English, Irish 
and German, ami the paternal grandfather, 
Janu-s Byland, was a fanner in Pern coun- 
ty, Ohio, while the maternal grandfather, 
Caac Johns. .n. was a fanner ..f Pickaway 
county, 1 ihio. ( )f the family of six children 



70 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



left practically dependent upon their own re- 
sources, four besides Thomas C. attained 
maturity: Rebecca, who is now Mrs. 
George Hummel: Isaac; Jane; Erne. Af- 
ter the death of Amos 1'. viand his widow 
married Isaac Scibert and they had 
one child. Thomas Corwin Byland was but 
three years of age when his father died, and 
since he was ten years of age lie lias made 
his own way in the world, and at the age of 
thirteen he manfully shouldered the responsi- 
bility of his own maintenance. Departing 
from the homestead in Ohio he removed to 
Piatt county. Illinois, where he found em- 
ployment on a farm until twenty years of 
age. During this time he faithfully applied 
himself to the acquisition of such knowledge 
as was available at the public schools and at 

the academy at Danville, Illinois, and bj the 
fall of [874 had qualified for educational 
work. Subsequently he taught school in 
Shelby county, Illinois, for two years, and 
in [876 located in Weldon, ami continued 
to teach for four terms in Nixon ami De- 
Witt township-. lit- later taught in the 
public schools of Weldon on and off for four 
terms. In 1881 he prepared for future in- 
dependence bj learning the trade of carriage 
maker, which he ha- since successfully fol- 
lowed, his work being interspersed by oc- 
casional returns to teaching in Weldon. 

'Die marriage of Mr. I'.yland and Mar- 
garet, daughter of Amos and Hannah Mc- 
Nier, Formerly of Ohio, now of Nixon town- 
ship, occurred March [8, 1879. Three chil- 
dren are the result of this union. Kittie L., 
Cora P. and Warren T. In politics Mr. 
Byland is a Republican, and has held several 
local offices, including that of township clerk, 
assessor, school director, collector ami presi- 
dent of the village board of Weldon. He is 
fraternally associated with the Weldon 
Lodge, Xo. 746, A. F. & A. M„ the Modern 



Woodmen and the Royal Circle. He is one 
of the most substantial citizens of the town, 
and his influence on education, good govern- 
ment and general progressiveness is a wide 

one. 

— ■ — ■ — ■» » » 

JONATHAN K. DAVIS. 

Jonathan K. Davis, a retired farmer re- 
siding in the city of Clinton, Illinois, has 
made his home in DeWitt county for almost 
half a century, and his name is inseparably 
connected with its agricultural and business 
interests. Hi- thoroughly American spirit 
and his great energy have enabled him to 
mount from a lowly position to one of af- 
fluence. One of his leading characteristics 
in business affairs is his tine sense of order 
and complete System, and the habit of giv- 
ing careful attention to details, without 
which success in an undertaking is never an 
assured fact. Mr. Davis started in life with 
nothing hut a strong determination to suc- 
ceed, and now that hi- fondest dreams have 
been realized he is -pending his last days 
in ease and quiet at his beautiful home in 
the city of Clinton, which was hut a mere 
hamlet when he first came to this county. 

Mr. Davi- wa- born in Perry county, 
Ohio, April 7, 1821, and is a son of John 
Davi- and grandson of William and Eliza- 
beth Davis, the former a native of Wales, 
who came to this country prior to the Revo- 
lutionary war. in which great struggle for 
American independence lie took an active 
part, serving from the beginning till the end 
under General Washington. He saw and 
endured many hardships and privations that 
the soldiers of those days were compelled to 
go through. He was with Washington the 
winter that this grand man encamped at 
Valley Forge, the history of which is fa- 




J. K. DAVIS. 




MRS. J. K. DAVIS. 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



75 



miliar to every one. After the close of this 
war he settled in Frederick county, Marx- 
land, where he made farming his life oc- 
cupation and where he was called to his final 
rest at the age of sixty-five years. His wife. 
Elizabeth, was an English lady, and lived 
to reach a good old age. They became the 

parents of the following children: Eliza- 
beth, Benjamin and John. 

John Davis, the father of the gentleman 
whose name introduces this sketch, was born 
in Frederick county, Maryland in 17S5. His 
early life was spent on a farm and he also 
run a hotel and at one time operated a ferry 
across the Monoxico creek, near where it 
flowed into the Potomac river. In 1816 he 
decided that the west 1 >ffered better induce- 
ments to a young man and accordingly bade 
g line to his native county and after ex- 
periencing all the hardships incident to 
travel in those early days he finally settled 
in I'crrv county, Ohio. This was just after 
the war of iNu. in which he took an active 
part. He was present at the burning of 
Washington by the British and took part in 
other important engagements. He was 
united in marriage with Miss Hannah 
Karshner. who was a native of Pennsyl- 
vania. The trip t < > Ohio was made by 
wagon, in which they lived for some time, 
or until a more suitable dwelling could he 
erected. Their stay in Perry county was 
of but a lew years' duration, when they re- 
moved to Senaca county and were one <>\ 
the first nine families to locate in Bloom 
town-hip. This was in [824 when Indians 
were more numerous than white men. Here 
he bought one hundred ami sixty acres of 
land, cut the trees and erected a rude log 
house in which to live. This dwelling was 
very primitive. At first it had no windows 
and later, when the march of improvements 
began to sweep over this vast western coun- 



try, windows were put in. and our subject 
can recall In iw queer they looked, a- they 
were the fust that he had ever seen. Soon 
the farm was cleared and after a few vears 
where the forest stood were well cultivated 
fields. On this place our subject's father 
remained until his death, which occurred on 
July o. [849. He was an earnest Christian 
man and a devout member of the Methodist 
church for over thirty years. His estimable 
wife also passed away on the old. homestead 
at the age of fifty years. They were the 
parents of eighl children, as follows: Will- 
iam, who is now living in Bloomville, < )hio; 
Jonathan l\.. our subject; Alfred ( >.. de- 
ceased: Sarah, who married J. W. Stinch- 
comb; Elizabeth married Smith Taylor; 
Thomas \V. is a physician and makes his 
home in Wapella, this county: Susanna; 
Milton R., of Charleston. Missouri. All 
these children were strong and robust and 
all lived to reach a good old age. with the 
exception of two, who died before reaching 
maturity. 

The educational privileges of our sub- 
ject were very meager, as he attended a log 
school house with greased paper for windows 
and split logs for seats, but in the face of 
all these obstacles he managed to secure a 
good elementary education. Then by work- 
ing at various occupations he managed to 
save enough to enable him to take a course 
of study in the Wesleyan University at Del- 
aware. Ohio, where he remained for six 
months. Since that time he has been a con- 
stant reader of good literature and to-day 
he is a finely educated man. 

It was at the age of twenty-five vears 
that he determined to start out in the world 
alone. He at first rented a sawmill and 
farmed on the shares. In this way he got 
a start and soon after bought eighty acres 
of land in Indiana, which he later disposed 



7 6 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



of and purchased a half interest in his fa- 
ther's farm. After a time he sold this and 
bought <>ne hundred and sixty acres, Upon 
which he lived until he came to 1 >e\Vitt 
county, in [857. lie located in Clinton and 
entered into partnership with S. Taylor and 
engaged in mercantile business in a frame 
building that stood on the corner now oc 
cupied bj the Magill House. This partner- 
ship continued for about three months, when 
he retired from the business and bought 

ity acres of land in Wilson township, 
tin- county, which was first settled by a Mr. 
Cloud and which was partially improved. 
A log cabin had been erected and some fruit 
trees sel out. a few of which were still liv- 
ing. At that time the only tree in sight of 
the house was a Cottonwood that had been 
planted near the door. This grew to an 
enormous size. Soon a frame house took 
the place of the log cabin and from that 
time till the present day -Mr. Davis has 
steadily prospered in his undertakings, lie 
first added to his original purchase by pur- 
chasing the old Bell farm oi one hundred 
and sixty acres. To this he added the 
Lewis farm of one hundred ami twenty 
acres, then fifty-five acres .if timber land 
and still later an eighty-acre tract of par- 
tially improved land. In addition to his 
farming he made a specialty of tine cattle, 
horses and hogs, which he raised for mar- 
ket. At times he has had as high as sev- 
enty-five head of cattle ami one hundred 
and fifty head of hogs. His land he im- 
proved by tiling, putting several thousand 
dollars into tiles. 

At Tiffin. Ohio. , ,11 March S. [849, Mr. 
Davis led to the marriage altar Miss Mary 
S. Wilcox, daughter of Jacob and Rebecca 
(Dealander) Wilcox, who were early set- 
tlers in Ohio. Her father was a wagon- 
maker and lived to the good old age of 



eighty-four and his wife also attained the 
same age. Eight children blessed this 
union, as follows: Mary S. : Samuel; 
George; Uriah; Catherine, who married F. 
1). Kestler; Peter; Lovina and Lurena. 

To our subject and his wife were horn 
six children, namely : Jesse S.. who is agent 
for the Jones scales, married Mary Ross, 
now deceased and they have one child, 
Kash ; Evander resides in Kansas; Merrick, 
a large ranch owner in Texas, married Belle 
Brown, and they have seven children, 
Chauncey R., Mabel S.. Jonathan. Harold. 
Ira. Grace and Ida Belle; Jonathan lx. and 
Mary are both deceased; U. S. Grant is a 
farmer of Harp township, who married Ma 
Thorp, and they have two children. Sahella 
and Bernice. 

for twentj four years Mr. Davis served 

as justice of the peace, and for two years 
as a member of the hoard oi supervisors. 
On August jo. 1859, he induced Rev. Will- 
iam Hemic], a local minister, to have serv- 
ices in the school house, as he was one to 
build the first school house in the township. 
Here he was chosen leader and he and his 

g 1 wife did all in their power to keep 

up the interest of these meetings. He was 
always found ready and willing to do even 

more than his share to help the g 1 work 

along. He was a very liberal giver to- 
wards the new church, which was erected in 
1891, Rev. Walter Mitchell being the first 
minister to occupy its pulpit, but now it is 
under the past, .rate of Rev. Enis. When 
the school house was first built there were 
only seven families to send children to it, 
but now it is one of the best in the township. 
In 1895 Mr. Davis came to Clinton and 
purchased an elegant home, known as the 
White property, a large spacious residence 
with beautiful surrounding lawns and shade 
trees, a place he ami his wife can well enjoy 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



77 



the remainder of their lives and entertain 
their host of friends. Politically Mr. Davi> 

is a stanch Republican, hut was originally 
a Whig, having cast his first vote for Henry 
Clay in 1S44. 

Mr. Davis is in all respects a self-made 
man. Through his own exertions he lias 
attained an honorable position and marked 
prestige among the representative men of 
DeWitt county, and with signal consistency 
it may he said that he is the architect of his 
own fortunes, and one whose success amply 
justifies the application of the somewhat 
hackneyed, hut most expressive title, "a 
self-made man." 



WILLIAM W. MURPHEY. 

Prominent among the energetic, enter- 
prising and successful business men 
Farmer City is William W. Murphey, presi- 
dent cf the Weedman National Bank, which 
is one of the safest and most conservative 
moneyed institutions of the county. It was 
established in 1S71 by Thomas Brothers and 
John Weedman, with a capital of forty thou- 
sand dollars, and when Oscar Thomas died 
Mr. Weedman purchased the other brother's 
interest and carried on the business alone, 
with J. B. Lewis as cashier and teller and 
W. K. Star as bookkeeper. On the 30th of 
November, [885, n was reorganized as the 
Weedman National Bank, with a capital of 
fifty thousand dollars, the officers being 
Mathias (.'rum. president; Y. S. Lindsley, 
vice-president; and < '. M. C. Weedman, 
cashier. The hank building, which was a 
w len structure, was destroyed by tire Au- 

* 3. 1N04. hut immediately a handsome 
hrick building was erected on the same site, 
into which the company moved January 1, 



1895. It is modern in its appointments 

throughout, and has the besl of deposit 
vaults. In January. [897, Mr. Murphey was 
made president of the hank and has since 
Tilled that office. In January. [893, C. M. 
I Weedman was succeeded by < '•■ M . Kin- 
caid as cashier, the latter having entered the 
employ of the company as clerk in r886 
and gradually worked his way upward to 
cashier, which position he still tills m a most 
satisfactory manner. The capital stock was 
increased to seventy-five thousand dollars in 
[890, and there is now a surplus of twenty- 
five thousand. Mr. Murphey is a man of 
keen discrimination and sound judgment, 
and his executive ability and excellent man- 
agement have brought to this concern a 
high degree of success. The safe, conserva- 
tive policy which he follows commends it- 
self to the judgment of all. and has secured 
a patronage which makes the volume of busi- 
ness transacted over it< counters of great 
importance and magnitude. 

Mr. Murphey was born in Frederick 
county, Virginia, < >ctober 15. 1838, a son of 
Hiram and Grace F. (Mitchell) Murphey, 
who were also natives of the < )ld Dominion. 
The father followed the saddler's trade for 
many years at Winchester, and on leaving 
there in 1S44 removed to Sheets Mills. Vir- 
ginia, whence he came with his family t< 1 1 )e- 
W'itt county. Illinois, in [852, locating in 
Santa Anna township, where he became a 
land owner and successful farmer, lie died 
August jo. [881, at the age of eighty-four 
years, and his wife passed away December 
17. [880, at the age of seventy-three years. 
I loth were earnest members of the Methodist 
Episcopal church. In their family were the 
following children: Thomas I.. ami De- 
borah, both deceased; Mary F... widow of 
Alex Holmes; William W\. our Bubject; 
Robert A. and John I'., deceased: Prances 



7» 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



Rl., widow of George Page; Levi R. and 
Isaac, who is also deceased. 

In 1843 our subject went to live with bis 
uncle. John Smith, one of the honored pio- 
neers of this county. He was born in I tardy 
county, Virginia, February 27, 1805, and in 
1835 came to DeWitt county, Illinois, and 
took up his residence in Mi. Pleasant, now 
Farmer City, opening the first hotel in the 
place and serving as its firsl postmaster, the 
office first being called Santa Anna. The 
office was then located on the cornet" of 
South Main street and Clinton avenue, 
where the marble works now stand. Mr. 
Smith subsequently followed farming and 
became the owner of a large amount of land 
in this county, lie married Miss Mary 1). 
Mitchell, one of the first school teachers in 
tins locality. As they had no children of 
their own they adopted our subject and were 

to him most indulgent parents. No mother 
ever loved a child more fondly than Mrs. 
Smith loved him or was willing to sacrifice 

more for his happiness. She died July 31, 
1878, aged seventj seven years, and Mr. 
Smith died on the 8th of June, the same 
year, aged seventj three years. They were 
mosl estimable people and Mrs. Smith was a 
member of the Methodist Episcopal church. 
and Mr. Smith gave liberally to its support. 
Mr. Murphej was educated in the pub- 
lic schools of this count}, and the Normal 
School at Normal, Illinois, and later engaged 
in teaching school for three terms. I lis 
fust purchase of land consisted of eighty 
acres known as the Burford farm, now 
owned by Mr. Brucken, and he subsequently 
traded that property for the Bracken farm 
of one hundred and sixty acres, which he 
vet owns ami which he has greatly improved 
by tiling it and erecting an entire new set of 
farm buildings. Upon this place he makes 
his home and is successfully engaged in gen- 



eral farming and stock-raising in connection 
with his banking interests. 

In McLean county, Illinois, October 5, 
[865, Mr. Murphey married Miss Nancy 
Helen Burford, a daughter of Cary and 
Anna (Shields) Burford. Her father was 
a retired farmer of Farmer City. By this 
union were born five children, namely: Ed- 
win C. a prominent jeweler and esteemed 
citizen of Farmer City, who died in [898 at 
the age of thirty years; Grace \.. who is the 
wife of Benjamin Overstreel and has three 
children, Walter, Albert and Pearl; Mary 
Viola is the wife of Fred Swaney and has 
two children, Merval and Pearl; and 
Blanche E. and Wayne \\'.. both at home. 

< »n the inauguration of the Civil war Mr. 
Murphe) enlisted in July, [861, in Company 
F, Forty-first Illinois Volunteer Infantry, 
and for gallant service was promoted to the 

rank of sergeant. He was twice wounded. 
first in the left arm at Fort Donelson, and 
later in the right hip during the siege of 
Jacks, in. Mississippi. These honorable scars 
he will carry with him to his grave, lie is 
now a prominent member and past com- 
mander of Lemon Lost, No. Jit. < '•■ A. K., 
at Farmer City, and the Independent Order 
-1 1 >dd Fellows, also of Farmer City, and is 
trustee of the Methodist church, to which he 
belongs. Politically he is a stanch Republi- 
can, and is as true to his duties of citizenship 
in days of peace as when he fought for the 
old flag and the cause it represented. 



JOHN SUMMERVILLE. 

John Summerville, who resides on sec- 
tion 4. Wapella township, owns and oper- 
ates a valuable farm of two hundred acres,, 
whose neat and thrifty appearance well in- 



THE BIOGKAIMIU )AL RECORD. 



79 



dicates his careful supervision! Substantial 
improvements arc surrounded by well tilled 
fields, and all of the accessories and con- 
veniences of a model farm arc there found. 

Mr. Summerville was born on the farm 
where he now resides, February 17. [8 
and is a son of James Summerville, who 
came to this country in 1848, when a young 
man. and for ten years worked in the Illinois 

tral Railroad shops at Wapella. lie then 
purchased one hundred and twenty acres of 
the railroad company in Wapella township, 
and in 186] added to it a tract of forty acre-. 
for which he paid fifty dollars per acre 
After erecting a house upon his land he 
located thereon, and to the further improve- 
ment and cultivation of that farm devoted 
his attention for some time. He subsequent- 
ly bought one hundred and sixty acres of 
land in Clintonia township, and an adjoining 
tract of forty acres, his landed possessions 
then aggregating four hundred acres. He 
was in limited circumstances on coming to 
this county, but being industrious, enterpris- 
ing and persevering, he gradually worked 
his way upward until he was one of the well- 
to-do and prosperous citizens' of his com- 
munity. In [894 he retired from active 
labor and removed to Clinton, where he 
made his home until his death, which oc- 
curred December 31, [898. In this county 
he married Miss Elizabeth Heenan. who was 
born and reared in Ireland, but who sur- 
vived her husband, being a resident of Clin- 
ton until her death. August 14, 1 901. The 
children 1m .rn to them are William T.. a 
fanner of Clintonia township: John, of this 
review; Margaret, who is living in Clinton. 

John Summerville grew to manhood 
upon the home farm and was educated in 
the local schools. When his father retired 
he succeeded to the farm in Wapella town- 
ship, and has since successfully engaged in 



it^ operation, lie is a well-known breeder 
of Clydedale anil Englishshire horses, giv- 
ing particular attention to that branch of his 
business, and in all his undertakings has 
steadily prospered thus far. Politically he 
is a stalwart Democrat, having never failed 
in his allegiance to that party since casting 
his tirst presidential vote for Grover Cleve- 
land in [888. He was elected and served 
two years as commissioner of highways, and 
has always taken a deep and commendable 
interest in public affairs. Religiously he is 
a member of the Catholic church. 



I. FRANK Dl : V 



This well-known merchant of W'aynes- 
ville. Illinois, is a man whose sound com- 
mon sense and vigorous, able management 
of his affairs have been important factors in 
his success, and with his undoubted integ- 
rity of character have given him an honor- 
able position among his fellow men. He 
was born in Decatur county. Indiana, Sep- 
tember 6, [854, but during his infancy was 
brought to this state, where he has since 
made his home. 

His father. J. \Y. Dix. was a native of 
Virginia and a son of John Dix. J. W. 
Dix grew to manhood in Virginia and then 
removed to Ohio, and settled near Xenia. 
There he married Martha Smith, a native 
of New Jersey, and a daughter of William 
Smith, who was one of the early settlers 
Ohio. After his marriage he removed to 
Indiana, where he spent one year, and then 
in 1S54 came to Illinois and took Up his 
residence in Bloomington, where he fol- 
lowed blacksmithing for a few years, hav- 
ing learned that trade in early life. In [869 
he removed to Waynesville, DeWitt county, 



8o 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



and opened a wagon, repair and blacksmith 
shop, carrying on business here for some 
years. He next went to Kingman, Kansas, 
in 1882, and spent the remainder of his life 
at that place, dying there in 1888. His 
wife still survives him and resides with her 
youngest sun in Newton, Kansas. In the 
family were twelve children, four sons and 
eight daughters, all of whom reached ma- 
ture years, and all of the SOTIS and four of 
the daughters are still living. 

J. Frank Dix, of this review, was a lad 
of about fifteen years when he came with 
the family to DeWitt county. He received 
Ins early education in the common schools, 
which he attended during the winter months, 
while he worked on a farm through the 
summer season. After reaching manhood 

lie took charge of a store at Waynesville, 
which he success fully managed for two 
years, and during that time became thor- 
oughly familiar with the mercantile busi- 
nses. In May. 1879, be opened a small 
restaurant of his own, and as soon as he had 
secured sufficient capital he put in a small 
stuck of groceries, to which he added from 
time to time as his financial resources per- 
mitted, lie built up quite a g 1 business, 

hut in 1884 sold out, and for three years 
was engaged in buying and shipping grain. 
At the end of that time he bought hack his 
store and continued in the restaurant anil 
grocer} business until his building and stock 
were destroyed by tire in 1 Si) 1. With char- 
acteristic energy he at once rebuilt, and now 
1 a! a large double store, and carries a well- 
selected stock of groceries, hardware, 1 ts. 

slioes, etc. Having made for himself an 
enviable reputation for fair dealing, lie re- 
ceded a liberal share of the public patron- 
age. On the organization of the Waym 
ville Hank he became one of the original 
stockholders, and three years later was made 



a director and vice-president, in which ca- 
pacity he has since served. He owns a nice 
residence in Waynesville, which he has re- 
cently remodeled, putting in hot water heat 
and all of the conveniences found in a city 
home. 

I >n the 15th of December, 1881, in De- 
W'itt county. Mr. Dix was united in mar- 
riage with Miss Laura Sprague, a native 
of Ohio and a daughter of James Sprague, 
who was one of the early settlers of this 
county and died in the service of his coun- 
try during the war of the Rebellion. Mrs. 
I>i\ was reared and educated in this county, 
and by her marriage to our subject has be- 
come the mother of two children. Fred and 
Fern. 

In political sentiment Mr. Nix is a Dem- 
ocrat, and has supported every presidential 
nominee of that party since casting his first 
vote for Grover Cleveland in [884. He has 

taken quite an active pa/1 in local politics; 
has served as township clerk, and since iS-c) 
has been school treasurer. lie was a mem- 
ber of the town board several years; was its 
president one term; ami was instrumental 
in securing the water works ami other 
needed improvements in the city. He also 
served four terms as township collector, and 
in whatever position be has been called upon 
to till he has most capably and satisfactorily 
harged its duties. Socially he is a mem- 
ber of Waynesville Lodge, I. 0. 0. F. ; 
Waynesville Lodge, F. & A. M. ; and At- 
lanta Chapter, R. A. M.: and both he and 
his wife belong to the Eastern Star Chapter. 
Mr. Nix belongs to thai class of men whom 
the world terms self-made, for beginning 
life without capital, he has conquered all the 
obstacles in the path to success, and has not 
only secured for himself a handsome com- 
petence, but by his efforts has materially 
advanced the interests of the community; 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



81 



with which In lated. lit- is a prom- 

inent figure in business, political and social 
circles, and ranks among the leading citizens 
of Wavnesville. 



AUSTIN R. SHIT.. 

Among the county officials of Ik-Witt 
County there is probably none more popular 
than Austin K. Shue. who is now >. « effici- 
ently serving as sheriff. He was born in 
Clinton. Missouri, on the 1st of January. 
85 . anil is a son <>i John and Sarah 
( Mitchell I Shue. lx>th natives of ' >hio. His 
paternal grand father. Gotlieb Shue. came to 
this country from Germany, and followed 
the tailor's trade throughout the greater part 
of his life. He spent his last days in this 
county, and his remains were interred in 
Wilson township. A more extended men- 
tion of the Shue family will lie found on 
another page of this volume. 

The lather of our subject was horn in 
Muskingum county. Ohio, and in early life 
turned his attention to agricultural pursuits. 
In 1869 he came t<> DeWitt county, Illinois. 
and after spending s. .me time in Harp town- 
ship located permanently in Wilson town- 
ship, where he followed farming quite suc- 
lly. He devoted his attention princi- 
pally to the raising of horses, and was one 
of the most successful breeders of Norman 
5 in the county, raising many valuable 
animals. He died in 1894, at the a. 
fifty-nine years, honored and respected by 
all who knew him. His wife is still living. 
They were the parents of eight children, 
namely: Austin R., our subject: Mary, 
wife of T. W. Wilson, of thi> county: Lo- 
gan, deceased: Ulj jses G and Edward, who 
live in this county: Ella, deceased wife 
of 11. S. Griffith, of this county: Almeda. 



wife of T. Moore, of this county; and Fred, 

a resident of McLean county. Illinois. 
Austin R. Shue grew to manhood upon 

the home farm, and early in life made a 
study of the art of successful farming. He 
gan life for himself in. a small way upon 
an eighty-acre tract of land which his wife 
had inherited from her father, and to this 
property he has since added until they now 
have two hundred and fourteen acres, which 
he has placed under a high state of cultiva- 
tion. He has set out an orchard, erected a 
comfortable residence, a good barn and other 
buildings, and has made many other im- 
provements upon the place, which add 

itly to its valuable and attractive ap- 
pearance. It previously belonged to the old 
Harold estate. Mr. Shue successfully en- 
j _ed in general farming and stock raising 
until elected sheriff, and on his removal to 
Clinton to assume the duties of that office 
he rented his farm. 

In February. 1881, he married Miss Cora 
McCord, daughter of Washington McCord, 
an early settler and successful farmer of 
this county. It is worthy of mention that 
Mr. Shue is the third of Mr. McCord's 
sons-in-law elected sheriff of this county. 
Our subject and his wife have seven chil- 
dren, all living, namely: Hallie. Gertrude, 
Mary. Welby, Nellie, Ella and John Wash- 
ingti in. 

Mr. Shue has always taken an active 
and commendable interest in public affairs, 
and has been called upon to till several local 
offices, including those of school director 
and road commissioner. In the fall of [fi 
he was elected sheriff on the Republican 
ticket, and has since served in that capacity 
to the entire satisfaction of his constituents. 
Fraternally he is a member of the Modern 
Woodmen of America, the Knights of Py- 
thias and the Royal - f Americ 



82 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



CHARLES W. McCORD. 

One of the prominent dealers in real es- 
tate, insurance and loans of Clinton. Illi- 
nois, is a native of the stale of Illinois and 
was bom in Santa Anna township, DeWitt 
county, on the 23d day of June. 1842. lie 
is a son of John and a grandson "t" James 
and a great-grandson of James, who was a 
native of Ireland and a son of Robert, who 
was a son of John, who in turn was a son 
of Robert, who in about [689 was a High- 
lander and chief of his clan in Scotland, and 
who met his death at the battle at Kille- 
crunkie Pass, in Scotland, during the Re 
hellion. 1 1 i> son John took part in numer- 
ous wars and died about 1 ~ 1 5 - llis sons 
were John, David, William. Robert, Samuel, 
Benjamin and James. These children after 
the death of their father removed to Stew- 
artstown, County Tyrone, Ireland, and 
about [720 John, David and William came 
to the United States and located in Penn- 
sylvania. John somewhat later moving to 
North Carolina. David and William were 
both killed by the Indians. 

The father ^\ these hoys. John, was bom 
in Argyle Skye, Scotland. llis coat of 
arms was a shield of gold in black and 
while, with three hearts and three lance 
heads on it. surmounted by a closed helmet. 
The history of the coat of arms is as fol- 
low - : "It seems t. . he a \ cry go< id one with 
its three hearts on golden ground and its 
three upward pointing arrow heads, which 
seem t" he typical of an upward aspiration. 
three, itself is a sacred and spiritual num- 
ber. There are first, three distinct folds in 
the drapery, which, taken with the parts. 
makes seven. The three hearts, three arrow 
heads and helmet make seven, another sacred 
number. The whole figure in its general 
outline is that of an upward pointing tri- 



angle, which in all religion is symbolical of 
spirit, hut all through the symbolism seems 
to he good." Families of the name of Mc- 
Cord still reside in the County of Tyrone, 
Ireland, and are all Presbyterians. 

James Met ord was horn in Ireland in 
[739 ami died at Spring (.'reek. Overton 
county. Tennessee, on .March 4, [824. lie 
went with his father to Lancaster county, 
Pennsylvania, at the age of four years, 
afterwards removing to Wilkes and Iredell 
counties, North Carolina, and from there he 
went to Overton county, Tennessee. He 
served in the Revolutionarj war and was 
wagon master general under George Wash- 
ington, lie married in Wilkes county, 
North Carolina, Jane Scroggs (or 
Scruggs), a Scotch lady, who died No- 
vember 1 J. 1789. They had nine children. 
Their son James was born in Wilkes county, 
February _'_•. 1770. and died in DeWitt 
county. Illinois. December 3, 1852. lie 
was married in Overton county. Tennessee, 
tn Mary Moore, mi March jo, 1X04. She 
was the daughter of Charles Moore and was 
horn in Granville county. North Carolina, 
October 29, 1 77« *. and died in DeWitt coun- 
ty. Illinois, May 23, 1S5S. They first set- 
tled mi Peterman's Bend, of Obies river, 
Overton county. Tennessee, where all their 
children were horn. They moved to Spring 
(reek about l S I 7 and to DeWitt county in 
[832, on a farm now- owned by S. J. 
Thomas. At that time there were hut six 
families in this part of the state, namely: 
Dennis Hurley, John Weedman, Richard 
Kirhy. William Dailey. Robert Cummings 
and James M. Porter, who are supposed to 
he the original settlers of this section. At 
first they lived in a double log house with 
a hall running the entire length of same 
and a fireplace at either end. This was later 
replaced by a frame house, which was con- 




JOHN McCORD. 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



85 



sidered a good one for those days and is still 
standing. In this family were the following 
children: Charles, James \\\. William Y.. 
Mrs. Sarah Pool, Mrs. Martha Shinkle, 

Mrs. Hannah Wakefield, John, the father of 
our subject, Mrs. Mary Heath and Mrs. 
Elizabeth Brown. 

(harlc- Moore, the father of our sub- 
ject's grandmother, was of Welsh stock, a 
cooper l>\ trade and served in the Revolu- 
tionary war. lie also engaged in making 
tin canteens for the soldiers, lie married 
Sarah Smith, a lady of Scotch descent. 

The father of Charles W. McCord «;» 
1.. in in ( herton county, Tennessee, April 5, 
1814. Upon reaching man's estate he pur- 
chased a farm in DeW'itt township, this 
county, which is now owned by Mr. Mc- 
Kinley. and followed farming until within 
fifteen years of his death, the last few years 
<>f his life being passed in the city of Clin- 
ton, where he died in March. 1 NX 1 . hi 
politics he was an old line Whig and was 
on one occasion elected by the Democratic 
vote to the office of justice of the peace, hut 
at that time, as he was the only Republican 
in the township, he refused to qualify and 
serve. He married Sarah S.. the daughter 
of Gabriel Watt, who was a Methodist 
preacher and a pioneer of this county. She 
was horn in [819 and her death occurred 
in 1896. To them were horn three children. 
William J., who died at Knoxville, Ten- 
nessee. March lS. [86-£ while in the service 
and a member of Company <i. < >ne Hundred 
Seventh Illinois Volunteer Infantry; Charles 
W., our subject, and his twin sister, Marie 
J., the widow of S. 1\. RiggS. She resides at 
Midland. Texas, and is the owner of a large 
stock ranch, comprising over forty sections 
of land. 

Charles W. McCord was raised on the 
farm of his parents and received the or- 



dinary common school education and later 

attended the Mt. Pleasant, Iowa. College, 
and then engaged m farming, buying what 

is now known as the Knob's farm in De- 
Witt township, comprising one hundred and 
twenty-seven acres. On this he resided for 
four years, making many improvements, 
when he disposed oi it and purchased one 
hundred and sixty aires in McLean coun- 
ty, which he improved and on which he re- 
sided for four years and then moved to 
Storm Lake. Iowa, where he carried on 
farming for eighteen years, lie then lived 
four years at Storm Lake Cit) and from 
there moved to Clinton. Illinois, to care for 
his mother, who was well advanced in years 
and where he has since made his home. 
Shortly after his arrival here he established 
his present business and has handled a large 
amount of property in this and adjoining 
states, and has also conducted a large insur- 
ance and loan business, in which he has been 
very successful. 

On Christmas day, [865, he married 
Margaret J. Swisher, daughter of Isaac one 
of the early and prominent settlers of this 
comity. A sketch of the Swisher family 
will he found on another page of this work, 
together with an engraving of Mr. Swisher. 
She died at the age of fifty-three years, < ),- 
toiler. [896, at Storm Lake. Iowa. She he- 
came the mother of four children: Ida M. 
married John A. Struble, of Clinton: and 
to them were horn two children. Harry and 
Mane. John died at the age of one year. 
Charles Frank, of Iowa, married Lithe 
Prysk, and to them were horn Lean 
Frank and Myrle. Katie Mane died at the 
age of nine months. 

Mr. McCord married for his second 
wife. October 23, [9OO, Mrs. \nianda ( '. 

Taylor, the daughter of Dr. c [brake, 

late of Clinton, and one of its most es- 



86 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



teemed physicians and surgeons. Mr. Mc- 
Cord is a member of the blue lodge, chapter 
and commandery of the Masonic fraternity, 
all of Clinton. 



JACOB W. AXD JOHN JONES. 

Anums;- the leading citizens and success- 
ful agriculturists of Barnetl township are 
numbered tin- Jones brothers, who reside on 
section to. and have been actively identified 

with the farming interests of this COUtttv 
since the fall of 1X511. They are natives >i 
Gibson county. Indiana, where Jacob W. 
was born January 25, iN_m. and John, 
March 13, [825. Their father, Charles 
Jones, was born in Madison county, Ken- 
tucky, in 171) 1. and was a son of Cadwall- 
ader Ji mes, w ho was a native 1 >f North Caro- 
lina and one of the firsl settlers of the Blue 
Grass state. For some time during his 

early residence in Kentucky his family had 
to live in the fort for protection from the 
Indian^. When a young man Charles Jones 
left his native state ami removed to Indi- 
ana, about 1 S 1 _' . and there he married Miss 
Eleanor Warrick, who was also born in 
Kentucky. Her father. Captain Warrick. 

was killed by the Indians in the battle of 
Tippecanoe, on the Wabash river, in 1S11. 
He was one of the firsl settlers of Gibson 
county. Indiana, having located there in 

[807. M:ere Mrs. Jones was reared, and 
there she continued to make her home after 
her marriage up to the time of her death, 
which occurred in 1N71. at the age of about 
seventy-two years. Her husband, who was 
a farmer by occupation, died in February, 

[864, ami both were laid to rest in the 
Owensville cemetery. They were the par- 



ents of twelve children, eleven of whom 
readied mature years, and seven sons are 
still living. 

The brothers in whom we are interested 
grew to manhood in Gibson county. Indiana, 
and their education was limited to a few 
months* attendance at the subscription 
schools of those days. They remained on 
the old homestead, engaged in farming and 
stock raising, until the fall of 1N50, when 
thev came to 1 leW'itt county. Illinois, hav- 
ing previously purchased three hundred and 
twenty .acres of land in Harnett township. 
To the further improvement and cultivation 
of that place thev have since devoted their 
energies with marked success, and as their 
financial resources have increased thev have 

extended the boundaries of their farm until 

thev now have nearly six hundred acres of 
rich and arable land. They have built a 
large and substantial resilience upon the 
place, good barns and other outbuildings, 
and have added all the accessories ami con- 
veniences usually found upon a model farm 
of the present day. John Jones gives con- 
siderable attention to the raising of pure- 
blooded short horn cattle, and is accounted 
one of the most successful stock-raisers oi 
the county, lie is one of the original stock- 
holders of the Waynesville Bank, and is also 

one of its directors. I lis 1 not her is a st,,ek- 
holder of the same institution and of the 
State Bank of Clinton. 

In October, [856, John Jones was mar- 
ried in Gibson county. Indiana, to Miss iv-r- 
nielia Montgomery, a native- of that county, 
as was also her father, J. W. Montgomery. 
Si\ children bless this union, namely: Ella, 
wife of W. T. Marvel, a farmer of Harnett 
township. DeWitt county. Illinois; War- 
rick. Charles ami Franklin, who are en- 
gaged in farming on the home place; and 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



87 



Martha and Mary, twins, the latter the wife 
ol (i. A. Randolph, who is engaged in the 

banking business in Warrensburg, Illinois. 
In early life the Jones brothers affiliated 
with the Whig party, and J. W. cast his tir-t 
vole for Henry Clay in 1S44. and John 
voted for General Zachary Taylor in 1848, 
but they supported John C. Fremont in [856, 
and have since l>een identified with the Re- 
publican party. In business affairs they are 
prompt, energetic and notably reliable, and 
through their own well-directed efforts they 
have achieved excellent success, being now 
numbered among the well-to-do and pros- 
is farmers of their community. 



CHARLES WALKER. 

Charles Walker, a highly respected citi- 
zen of Harp township, section [9, was born 
in Sangamon county. Illinois, February 14. 
i860. He is the sixth child of Judge Rob- 
ert and Sarah < Fretz I Walker, who were 
both natives of Pennsylvania, but resided in 
Ohio many years before coming to Illinois. 
A biography of their lives is included else- 
where in this lxx>k. Charles Walker was 
educated in the schools of Harp township, 
but his education was not confined to that 
received at school. By a wise father and 
a devoted mother he was trained in all those 
Christian virtues which unite to form the 
highest type of American manhood. Oc- 
tober 3, 1889, he was united in marriage 
with Mi-s Kate C. Capron, a daughter of 
William and Laura ( Willis) Capron. Will- 
iam Capron was a native of New York, a 
soldier in the Civil war and was captured 
at the battle of Cross Roads and confined 
even months in Andersonville prison, 
from which he was released at the cli 
the war. 



The subject whose name introduces this 

-ketch ha- always lived on the same place 

since he came to tin- county with hi- par- 
ent- at the age of live year-. 1 lere he urew 

to manhood and obtained hi- practical 
knowledge of agriculture. Mr. Walker- 
farm consists of one hundred and sixty 
acres of well-improved land, which he de- 
votes to general farming. The cattle which 
he raise- are short horns and are eligible to 
registry. He is also the owner of the im- 
ported Percheron stallion Sicot. He has 
good buildings on his farm, and everywhere 
are signs that the les.-oii- in agriculture 
which he learned from his father are being 
DUt to a wise use. J'hat he i- a successful 
farmer is evidenced by the fact that he has 
been chosen president of the Farmers 1 Insti- 
tute. He is also president of the Prairie 
Center Telephone Company, with head- 
quarters at Clinton. In politics be i- a Pro- 
hibitionist, and would like to see the curse 
of drunkeness removed from our beloved 
country. 

Charles Walker and his wife are the par- 
ent- of rive children, of whom one. an infant 
-0:1. 1- dead. Carl. Helen and the twins. 
Sarah and Laura, who are named after 
their two grandmothers, live to gladden the 
home of Charles and Kate Walker. Mr. 
Walker and his wife are prominent mem! 
of the Presbyterian church at Clinton. Ik- 
has been an elder in the church for four 
years and is a faithful adherent to the re- 
ligion of his father-. 



ALFRED HOMER MONTGOMERY. 

Prominent among the influential in 

paper men of DeWitt county is Alfred 
Homer Montgomery, editor of the Weldon 



38 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL- RECORD. 



Record. Many causes contribute to the suc- 
cess of Mr. Montgomery, not the least of 
which is an extended journalistic experi- 
ence, an intuitive knowledge of the demands 
of the leading public, and forceful, clear- 
cut, sensible ideas upon leading and inter- 
esting questions of the day. The tolerance 
and breadth of mind ventilated through the 
editorials and general columns of the Rec- 
ord challenge respect and attention from all 
who peruse its well-printed pages, no mat- 
ter what their individual political and other 
view-. A hard and conscientious worker, 
the editor of the Record has trodden no 
royal road to his present position, hut is in- 
debted solely to his own untiring efforts in 
learning ever) detail, from the bottom up. 
..i newspaper work. He was born Febru- 
ary 15. [876, near Middletown, Logan coun- 
ty, Illinois, a s, ,11 of William and Sarah 
(Dunmire) Montgomery. William Mont- 
gomery, s, ,11 of Thomas Jefferson, was one 
of a family of seventeen children, four 
daughters and thirteen sons, and his death 
occurred in 1NN1. when his son, A. 11.. was 
but five years of age. The lad lived on the 
home farm until 1SS4. when he accompanied 
lis mother, now Mrs. R. M. Ewing. and his 
step-father, to Farmerl City, Illinois, where 
the latter purchased the Farmer City Re- 
publican. Then began the career of the 
embryo journalist, for at the age of nine 
ars he entered the printing office of the 
Republican, attending also the public schools 
as opportunity afforded. The printing 
business seems to have been paramount at 
this time, for upon reaching the sophomore 
year he abandoned for the present further 
attempt at school education, and devoted 
himself exclusively to the affairs of the news- 
paper office. After the sale of the Republi- 
can his services were enlisted with the 
Farmer City Record, purchased by his 



mother and brother, H. E., with his step- 
father. R. M. Ewing, as editor-in-chief. 
After a fitful career of a year and a month 
in Farmer City under the new management, 
the outfit of the Record was taken to Wel- 
don, Mr. Montgomery arriving to contrib- 
ute his share toward manipulating the enter- 
prise in its new quarters in March of 1893. 
The control of the Record underwent a 
change in 1895, owing to the death of Mr. 
Ewing, at which time a partnership was 
formed between Mr. Montgomery and his 
brother, 11. H.. and continued amicably un- 
til the substitution of J. H. for II. 1-".. Mont- 
gomery, Upon the retirement of the latter 
t" Clinton in [896. By mutual consent the 
Record force was dissolved in [898, Alfred 
i lomer Ah tntgomery assuming complete con- 
trol of the sheet. Since [899 the periodical 
has been issued from its new home, a com- 
modious and well-planned office building of 

brick, fitted with all modern conveniences, 

; nd rendered acceptable to the eye by large 
plate glas> windows and elegant appropri- 
ate fixtures. 

The hospitable and delightful home of 
Mr. Montgomery is presided over by his 
wife, formerly Birdie McAboy, of Lane, 
Illinois, whom he married February 15, 
[898. 1 U' this union there are two chil- 
dren, Helen Irene and Robert William Har- 
rold Nates. The friends w\\,, delight in the 
surroundings of the beautiful Montgomery 
home are legion, and the utmost good fel- 
lowship, refinement and culture prevail to 
an unusual degree. 



MRS. LYDIA M. JOHNSON. 

The state of Illinois owes its high stand- 
ing among the sovereign commonwealths 
that make up the United States to the high 




ELIAS JOHNSON AND WIFE. 



Till-. r.loC.KAHIk- \I. RKCORD. 



91 



character and dauntless spirit of her pioneers. 
To their inspiration and work 1-- due her 
wonderful progress in agriculture, manu- 
facturing and the art-. They transformed 
the wild prairie lands into beautiful homes 
and farms, and in the midst of the wilder- 
ness established churches and >i-In » ils. lay- 
ing the foundations for the grand institu- 
tions of philanthropy and learning which 
are the glory of the state at the present day. 
Among those brave and far-sighted pioneers 
the family to which Mrs. Johnson belongs 
holds a prominent place. They came t" 
what is now DeWitt county in 1830, and 
were the first to locate in Farmer City, 
where she now makes her home. 

Her father. Dennis Hurley, was horn in 
Trenton. New Jersey, March 11. 171)7. an 'l 
was a son of James Hurley, who spent his 
last 1 lays in Illinois, where he died when a 
very old man. his remains being interred in 
Camp Ground cemetery. Santa Anna town- 
ship. His wife had previously died in the 
east. Their children were John. Robert, 
Timothy. Dennis. Catherine. Sarah and 
Mary. 

In early life Dennis Hurley removed to 
Ohio, where he wedded Miss Mary M. Con- 
nell. who was horn in Lancaster county.. 
Pennsylvania, October 27, [796. Her par- 
ent-. John and Margaret (Trice) Conneli, 
were natives of Ireland and Germany, re- 
spectively, and on their emigration to Amer- 
ica first settled in Lancaster county, Penn- 
sylvania, hut later removed to the line!-. 
state. Mr. Conneli was killed by a falling 
tree just west of Newark, Ohio. He was 
a weaver of broadcloth and also followed 
school teaching. In his family were eight 
children, namely: Adam. John. Mathew, 
David. Mary. Sarah. Margaret, Elizabeth 
and James. Mr. and Mrs. Hurley had ten 
children who grew to man and womanhood, 



whose name- and dates of birth were a- fol- 
lows: Sarah Ann. July 17. [820; ( aroline, 
October 28, 1821; Lydia M.. September 29, 
:S_>j; Jeremiah, April 17. [825; John. Sep- 
tember 22, 1826; Adeline. December 26 
[828; Mary Jane and Lewis, twin-. Febru- 
ary 4. 1830; Catherine, Jul) [6, [832; and 
David, December _'. 1834. Adam, the old- 
est, died young; a -on who was fifth in 
order of birth, died in infancy; and Dennis 
ami lame- died young. 

After hi- marriage Dennis Hurley made 
hi- home in Ohio for several years, hut in 
September, [830, started westward with a 
four-horse team and a new Virginia wagon, 
which contained his household goods and 
family. He was accompanied bj hi- brother- 
in-law, Richard Kirby, and his family. They 
were many days in making the journey, ar- 
riving at what i- now Bloomington, Illinois, 
during the second week of October. That 
city then contained only three log cahins, 
which were owned by James Allen. One 
wa- used a- a blacksmith shop, one a- a pro- 
vision store, and in the other the family 
lived. There the party camped to rest, near 
an old Indian camp, five miles south of 
Bloomington. Leaving hi- family there. 
Mr. Hurley started out to look for a loca- 
tion. He first settled at what is new known 
as Hurley's Grove, in DeWitt county, where 
lie built a split log cabin, eighteen feet 
square, which was afterward moved to the 
Mckinley Hotel for an outbuilding. After 
spending the winter there he went to South 
Prairie in the spring of [83] and located a 
farm, which he entered in 1833, when the 

first land agency was established in this -, 

tion of the -tate. This farm i- now the 
property of Hiram Stock. It consisted of 
eighty acres ,,f prairie laud and forty a< 

of timber. The first year Mr. Hurley broke 

twenty acre-, -et out an orchard and plant- 



92 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



ed a garden. The first house lie erected here 
served as his residence for six years, hut at 
the end of that time, believing his pasture 
to be a im >re suitable location, he there 
built a hewed log house, with a split shingle 
mi if ami puncheon floor, winch was con- 
sidered a fine resilience fur those days. 

There were three m. mis down stairs and one 
up. All the Clinking was done I >\ er the 
fireplace at one end of the kitchen. In those 
early days the family suffered many hard- 
ships and privations incident to life on the 
frontier. It was a long ways to either mar- 
ket nr mill, but wild game of all kinds was 
very plentiful and furnished many a meal 
fn|- the early settlers, there being deer. 

prairie chickens, wild turkeys, geese, dudes, 

etc. Mr. Hurley being a great hunter and 
a good slmt. his family always had an 
abundance of venison and other wild meat. 
The prairie wolves, together with the gray 
and black wolves, were very common and 
caused the earl) settlers much annoyance. 
Selling his first farm. Mr. Hurlej removed 
t'> what is now known as the Gillespie farm. 
but a tew years later disposed of that place 
bought a farm adjoining his old home. 
lie continued to reside mi this place until 
called to his final rest June 26, [866. I lis 
wife died July 6, 1S50, and thus passed 
away one of the oldesl and most honored 
pioneer couples in this section of the state. 
After the death of his first wife Mr. Hurley 
married a Mi's. Day and after her demise 
married Mrs. Gesford, who survived him. 
huring the third year of their residence 
here they were visited by the Kickapoo and 
Pottawattamie Indians, who proved very 
friendly and seemed t < > appreciate any kind- 
ness shown them. That same year Mr. 
Hurley and his eldest daughter attended a 
cam]) meeting at Randolph Grove, and he- 
came converted, joining the Methodist Epis- 



copal church. On his return home he es- 
tablished a Methodist Society in his neigh- 
borhood, consisting of his and Mr. Kirby's 
families, there being hut six members at the 
start. As soon as a school house was built 
in the neighborhood, he was instrumental in 
securing preachers to hold services there, 
the first being the Rev. Hall, followed by 
Rev. 1\. Clarke and Rev. 1'. Curnmings, who 
preached once in four weeks. Mr. Hurley 
was a class leader and held meetings at his 
own home. He led an upright, honorable 
and useful life, and was held in the highest 
regard by all who knew him. 

Mrs. Johnson, whose name introduces 
this sketch, was born in Newark, < >hio, Sep- 
tember 29, [822, ami was eight years of age 
when she came with her parents In this coun- 
ty, where she grew to womanh 1. < In the 

4th ..f February, [842, she gave her hand 
in marriage to Elias Johnson, who was 
burn in [ackson county, < >hio, and was a son 
of Silas and Elizabeth (Craig) Johnson. 
Ih- father was a native of Virginia, and 
fnnn that state removed to Jackson coun- 
ty, Ohio, and later came to Illinois, settling 
first in Vermilion county, and later in Rut- 
ledge township, DeWitt county, taking up 
land on the north fork of Salt creek, where 
he made his home for many years. He died 
at a g 1 1 'Id age and his wife was eighty- 
six at the time of her death, their remains 
being interred in the North Fork burying 
ground. In their family were eight chil- 
dren, namely: Thomas, John, Elias, Pres- 
ley, Lucinda, Nancy. Elizabeth and, Ellen, 

Elias Johnson acquired his education in 
an old log school house si. common during 

his boyh 1. In [837 he came with the 

family to DeWitt county, and began his 
business career as a farmer by purchasing 
fortv acres of land in Santa Anna township 
and entering a tract of similar size. Ill 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



93 



health preventing him from engaging in ag- 
ricultural pursuit-, he subsequently traded 
his farm for mill property on Salt creek, 
which he operated nine months. In i 
lie removed to Fanner City, and devoted the 

• of his life to loaning money. He was 
<me of the best financiers in his part of the 
county, ami although he gave liberally to 
charitable enterprises, he met with sue 
in business affairs anil amassed quite a for- 
tune. He built the residence now occupied 
by his widow, and also the J. \V. Si' [ 
home, and owned other property in Farmer 
City. 

Unto Mr. and Mrs. Johnson were born 
two children, namely: ( i ) Mary Elizabeth 
is the wife of John McDonald and has two 
children. Zua, who married J. R. Boying- 
ton and has one child, Irene: and ( Hive, who 
married Clyde Hudelson and has two chil- 
dren, Russell and Morri-. i _• i Hester An- 
geline first married James Brennan and after 
his death wedded J. Q. Jones. 

On the 15th of November, 1878, Mr. 

Johnson was stricken with paralysis, ami 

'during his long illness his faithful wife min- 

red to his every want without a murmur, 
and attended to his busi few women 

can. He died June 2 1. In early life 

he was a Republican, but later affiliated with 
the Prohibition party, being one of the first 
to vote that ticket. In 1K40. at the age of 
twelve years, he united with the Methodist 
Episcopal church, and was ever afterward a 
faithful and active member of the same. 
Mrs. Johnson is also an active worker in 
the Methodist church, and is a true and 
earnest Christian woman, who is loved by 
all who have the pleasure of her acquaint- 
ance. Although now well advanced in life, 
die is wonderfully well preserved. I*>th men- 
tally and physically, and appears much 
v. anger than she really is. 



Hi IN. MICHAEL DON Mill 

The man who achieves success in the 
legal profession is even more strictly the 

"architect of his own fortunes" than the 
average .-elf-made business man. there being 
in the keen competitions of the lawyer's life, 
with its constantly recurring mental duel 
between eager and determined antagonists, 
no chance for the operation of influences 
which may l>e called to the aid of the mer- 
chant, the manufacturer or the financier. 
Among the men of 1 leWitt county who have 
demonstrated their ability in this difficult 

I the Hon. Michael Donahue holds 
leading place, and his history affords an in- 
teresting example of ambition rightly 
directed and pursued with a zeal which oxer- 
come- all obstacle-. 

Mr. Donahue was born at Horseheads, 

r Elmira, New York. March 17. 1841, 

and i- a son of Neal (('Donahue and Ann 

O'Riley) Donahue, both native- nty 

Tyrone. Ireland. The father followed the 

occupation of a teamster throughout the 

ter part of his life. In 1843 ' ,e r( -' m ' 
to Chicago, where he died at the age of 
about fifty years, while his wife died at the 
of forty-five. They hail two children: 
Michael, our subject: and Thomas, an 
teemed citizen of Clinton. 

When the family removed to Chicago it 
had a population - of only five thousand. 
After the death of his parents Michael Don- 
ahue was bound out t«> Rev. Isaac Merium, 
:. Baptist minister living near Tremont, Illi- 
nois, with whom he remained until |8« 
He then went to live with a Mrs. \. < >. Mer- 
ium. who was a mother to him. From her 
he learned many valuable which b 

been a guide to him through life, and he still 
tenderly cheri-hes her memory. In early 
manhood he commenced learning the liar- 



94 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



ness maker's trade with William Metzger, 
oi Waynesville, Illinois, but soon afterward 
decided to study law, and worked at vari- 
ous occupations in order to earn the money 
with which to meet his expenses while pre- 
paring for the legal profession. He pur- 
sued his studies under the direction of C. II. 
Moore and Henry S. Green, of Clinton, and 
was admitted to the bar in February, 1863. 
In August of the same year he removed to 
Boonesboro, Iowa, where he remained till 
the spring of [864, when he returned to 
Clinton and opened an office and continued 
in the practice of his profession until [884, 
when he removed to 1 )maha, Nebraska. 1 1< 
again returned to Clinton m [888, where lie 
has since resided and practices his profes- 
sion. 

In [867 he Formed a partnership with 
lonel J. J. Kelley. who was later suc- 
ceeded by his son \Y. R, Kelley. This 
partnership continued till [878, when it was 
diss, iKed by mutual consent. 

In [864 Mr. Donahue was united in mar- 
riage with Miss Mar\ Clagg, daughter of 
William Clagg, of this county, and to them 
have been born four children : Mrs. Nancy 
Gill, of Kansas; Rosie; Florence; and Edna. 
As a Republican he has always been promi- 
nently identified with political affairs, and 
in 187O was elected to represent the Bloom- 
ington district in the state senate. So 
ceptably did he till the office that he was re- 
elected from the DeWitt and Macon coun- 
ties senatorial district at the end of his first 
term. From [862 until [869 he served as 
city attorney of Clinton, and was again 
elected to that office in 1892, filling it up to 
the present time. As a trial lawyer he has 
shown unusual force and has developed great 
strength as well in the systematic and care- 
ful preparation of his cases and the shrewd 
and thorough examination of witnesses as 



in the eloquent, logical and convincing man- 
ner of their presentation before court and 
jury. He is one of the most prominent Re- 
publican politicians of the county, and was 
one of the presidential electors who elected 
Hayes in [876. lie has taken an active in- 
terest not only in politics hut also in the 
welfare and progress of the county. Re- 
ligiously lie is a member of the Presbyterian 
church and a teacher in the Sabbath school, 
,md socially is a member of the .Masonic 
Order and the Knights of Pythias, having 
been connected with the former fraternity 

since [862. 

•—-+ 

THOMAS EWING. 

Mr. Ewing is one of the public-spirited 
citizens of Clinton, to whose energy and 
foresight that citj is indebted for many im- 
provements. While Mr. Ewing, as a pros- 
perous husniess man. has given close atten- 
tion to his own private affairs, he has never 
gotten or ignored that bond of common 
interest which should unite the people of 

e\er\ community, and he has ever been 

ready to promote progress in every line, 
lie was horn near Zanesville, Ohio, May J4, 
1N4J. and is a son of John Ewing, who was 
horn in Guernsey county. Ohio, September 
17. 1 S 1 4 . lie was a shoemaker by trade, 
hut for sixteen years operated a coal mine 
near Zancs\ illc, before coming to DeWitl 
county. In 1N5N he located in Barnett 
township, and later bought a farm in Harp 
township, which he cultivated until he 
reached his eighty-third year, when he re- 
tired and went to live with our subject. 
John Ewing is a son of Robert, who was 
a native of Virginia, whose father, with 
three brothers, came from the north of Ire- 
land. Robert Ewing was one of the early 




THOMAS EWING. 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



97 



settlers of Ohio, emigrating from the Old 
Dominion. He was a shoemaker by trade, 
and lived i" reach the age of eighty years. 
His wife, who was Mar) Beymer, died at 
the age of seventy years. Their children 
were as follows: Phillip, John, Simon, 
Stewart. Julia. Elizabeth, Ellen and l'.ina- 
line. The parents were members of the 
Methodist church. 

The subject of this review, Thomas Ew- 
ing, is one of the largest dealers in all kinds 
of grain and coal in the county, lie buys 
grain, shipping mostly to Chicago, south to 
Xew Orleans and east to quite an extent. 
This business was established about [878, 
by John J. McGraw, and about [883, this. 
together with the beautiful he •me. was pur- 
chased by Mr. Ewing. But the impn 
ments have been so great that it would hard- 
ly be recognized. A new office, scales, etc., 
have been erected, and the lawns surround- 
ing the spacious house are beautiful. This 
pretty home is located in the southern part 
of Clinton, at what is known as McGraw's 
Addition. Aside from this property our 
subject owns the old farm in Harp town- 
ship, which he has added to until he now 
lias a quarter section of well cultivated land. 

The early life of Thomas Ewing was 
spent on his father's farm, where he se- 
cured a good education in the public schools 
0/ the district, which was supplemented by 
a course of study in the Wesleyan Univer- 
sity at Bloomington, Illinois. In 1862, he- 
mg of a patriotic nature, he enlisted in Com- 
pany E, Sixty-eighth Illinois Volunteer In- 
fantry, as a private, hut his worth was soon 
recognized and he was promoted to ser- 
geant, in which position he served faithfully 
until the close of his enlistment. In [864 
he began teaching, which profession he fol- 
lowed for fourteen years, all this time con- 
lining himself to three districts in this coun- 



ty. At the end of this period he entered into 

his present business. 

Our subject's mother was Miss Matilda 
Richey, a daughter of Samuel and Hannah 
(Jackson) Richey. who were natives of 
Pennsylvania, and who came to DeWitt 
county as farmers in 1854. Mr. Richey 
died at the age of eighty-three years and 
the wife at sixty-eight They became the 
parents of the foil,, wing named children: 
Matilda, who became the mother of our sub- 
ject; Maria; Alexis J.; Catherine; Susan: 
Samuel J.: Austin J.; Hatr.:ah Ann; ami 
Abel Thomas. 

To Mr. and Mrs. John Ewing were horn 
the following named children: Andinet. who 
married John Harnett and is now deceased; 
Austin, who died at the age of four years; 
Thomas, whose name introduces this re- 
view, was the next in order of birth; Ellen, 
who married James Harnett; Simon, a resi- 
dent of White Heath, this state, married 
Miss Metta Mitchell: Nora, who married 
Madison Warrick, of Clinton. 

Mr. Ewing chose for a helpmate in life 
Miss Ordelia A., daughter of Isaac Mc- 

Cuddy, one of the early farmers of DeWitt 
county. As a result of this union the fol- 
lowing children have been horn: Russell, 
a farmer in this county, who married Mis^ 
NellieFohley ; Mont V.. formerly a baggage 
man on the main line of the Illinois Central 
Railroad, hut who is now connected with 
his father in the grain and coal business, 
married Tern 'Thomas; Blanche is the wife 

of Walter Marvel, and they reside in Tree- 
port, they have one child. Louise; Louise, 
the youngest daughter, died at the age of 
ft ,11 r v ears. 

The Democratic party has no m 

Stanch Supporter than the man whose name 

introduces this sketch, and for four years 

served his township as justice of the peace. 



9 3 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



and as school trustee for several years. He 
is a member of tin.' Knights of Pythias and 
was chairman of the building committee of 
erecting the K. of 1'. building in Clinton, 
ami has held several offices of the order with 
much credit to himself, lie is also a mem- 
ber of Frank Lowry Post No. 157, G. A. R. 
Mr. Ewing has also taken a prominent part 
in the organization of the Clinton Chautau- 
qua, which held its first meeting in August, 
[901. The following, which we copy from 
the Clinton Daily Public, will be read with 
interesl : 

"About the first of this year a few of 
the citi/ens of Clinton conceived the idea 
of organizing a Chautauqua at Weldon 
Springs, the only natural place in Central 
[llinois for such an undertaking. A meet 
i'ng was called and held in the o unity court 
1 to sel( is and tlic •,,, called un- 

lucky number of thirteen was present, and 
election of the following directors : — 'I'h. .mas 
Ewing, Judge < '•. K. fngham, W. II. Ogle 
bee, John Fuller, W. B. Readey, F. C. Hill, 

rj Hughes, F. E. Pinkerton, and C. R. 
Adair. The directors elected the following 

cers:- 1 'resident. < i. K. fngham; Vice- 

sident, F. E. Pinkerton; Second Vice- 
President, \\ . B. Readey; Secretary, F. C. 
Hill; Treasurer. Thomas Ewing. 

"The foundation of the association are 
those who first subscribed for fifteen dollars 
worth of tickets and to the guarantee fund, 

1 aggreeing to pay a deficit of one hun- 
dred dollars each and others three hundred 
dollars each. These guarantees entitle mem- 
bers 1.. one vote each for every ten tickets 
and one vote each for each one hundred 
dollar guarantee. Thirty-two citizens of 
Clinton and vicinity signed this guarantee. 
The am. .tint of the guarantee fund was M -\ - 
en thousand dollars, which will not be called 
for as there is a surplus to be used as a re- 



serve fund for next year. Up to the pres- 
ent time there are sixty-two members of the 
Chautauqua association." 

In life Mr. Ewing fully demonstrated 
the word success, which is dus entirely to 
his own well directed efforts, for without 
the aid of influence or wealth, he started 
out to make his own way in the world, and 
today is one of the most substantial and 
properous man in his community, as well 
as one of the most llighlj esteemed citizens. 



MRS. M \UY RU rLEDGE. 

Mrs. Mary Rutledge, one of the oldest 
and most esteemed residents of Rutledge 
township, as well as one of the pioneers of 
this section ^<\ the state, was horn in Clai- 
borne county. Tennessee, June 2, [822, and 

i^ a daughter of Jacob and Rachel ( Hughes) 
Van Deventer, both of whom were natives 
of Sullivan county, Tennessee. Her pa- 
ternal grandparents were' Abraham and 
Martha Van Deventer, the former of Ger- 
man and the latter of English descent. They 
were farming people and lived to a good 
old age. In their large family of children 
there were five sons, Thomas, Abraham, 
John. Peter and Jacob. In 1831 Jacob Van 
Deventer came with his family to Illinois 
and settled in McLean county, where he died 
in the fall of 1833, his remains being inter- 
red at LeRoy. He foughl in the war of 
[812 under General Jackson. His wife en- 
tered land in McLean county, and with the 
i stance of her children improved it, mak- 
ing it her home throughout the remainder 
of her life. She was a devout ('liristian, 
being a member of the Cumberland Presby- 
terian church, and died in that faith, at the 
age of eighty-three years. She had a fam- 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



99 



ily of five sons and five daughters, namely: 
Tin .mas; Abraham; John; David, a min- 
ister >>t" the Cumberland Presbyterian 

church: Martha: .Mary: Mahala and Mar- 
ana, twins: James: and Louisa. 

Mrs. Rutledge was about nine years of 
when she accompanied her parents on 
their removal to this state, and on her 
mother's farm in McLean county she grew 
to womanhood. She was married, Janu- 
ary 17. 1839, to William Jackson Rutledge, 
who was 1 >« >m in White county, Illinois, 
June 23, 1816, a son of Thomas and Sarah 
ifficer) Rutledge. His father was born 
in North Carolina, of English ancestry, and 
hsi mother in South Carolina, of Irish par- 
entage: History -ays the family was 
founded in Georgia. While living in Ken- 
tucky Thomas Rutle ed as a ranger 
in the war of 1812, and after i: mi- 
grated to White county, Illinois, where he 
made his home until [828, and then removed 
to what i- now Randolph Grove, McLean 
inty. There he died in 1830, at the age 
sixty-two years. His wife was well ad- 
vanced in years at the time of her death. 
which occurred thirteen years later. In 
their family of ten children were lame-. 
Mark. Officer, Robert, William J.. Mrs. 
Jane Qickinson, Mrs. Polly Craig, Mrs. 
Sally Cline and Mrs. Betsey Britten. 

William J. Rutledge aided hi- mother 
in the operation of the home farm until nine- 
teei 1 age, and made the most of the 

educational advantages afforded him by the 
public conducted in an old log 

school-house near hi- home. He first mar- 
ried Mi-- Eliza Duffield, a daughter of Rob- 
ert Duffield. She died three years after 
their marriage, leaving two children: Mar- 
tha J. and John A., who died, leaving large 
families that are represented elsewhere in 
this work. For his second wife Mr. Rut- 



ledge wedded our subject, as previously 
stated. 

In 1838 Mr. Rutledge bought a claim 
ami entered one hundred and sixty acre- 
prairie and timber land on section 17 of 
what is now known as Rutledge town-hip. 
it being named in his honor. His tir-t home 
here was a -mall log house, twenty by eight- 
een feet in dimensions, with two doors hut 
no windows. There was a large fireplace 
at one end, with a mud and -tick chimney. 
rind the furniture of the cabin was all of the 
mo^t primitive sort. This house was sub- 
sequently replaced by a small frame resi- 
dence, and when that was destroyed by lire 
the present home of Mrs. Rutledge was 
built, though it has since been remodeled 
and enlarged. In [846 while her husband 
was working with his oxen he -tuck his 
Cottonwood whip in the lane and it took 1 
and grew, so that it is to-day a beautiful 
tin standing in the center of the road 
half mile ea-t of hi- residence — a landmark 
of early days. The oldest pear tree of Rut- 

_c township, if not of DeWitt county. 
stands in his yard at the corner of the r 
running north of section 17. and many of 
the 1 'Id residents of that locality have eaten 
of its fruit. It was grafted on an apple 

tree. 

Mr. Rutledge was a man of exceptional 
business ability and an able financier, and at 
hi- death, which occurred July 6, iSS_\ he 
had accumulated over seven hundred acres 
of land. Charitable and benevolent, he gave 
to all worthc enterprises for the public good, 
and he assisted many of the early settlers 
in buying houses, often loaning hi- friends 
money without interest. In politic- he was 
a stalwart Democrat, hut never aspired to 
office. Religiously he was an active mem- 
ber of the Cumberland Presbyterian church, 
and was a man highly respected and es- 



IOO 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



teemed, his memory being cherished by all 
who knew him. His widow is in possession 
of the old homestead, which goes to the 
grandchildren at her death. She is a most 
estimable woman, who has a wide circle of 
friends and acquaintances who hold her in 
high regard. 

C1IAKI.ES \V. BISHOP. 

Charles W. Bishop, who lives with Mrs. 
Rutledge on the did homestead, was born 
in McLean county, Illinois. November -7. 
[860, and is a son "f Jacob C. and Mary 
Ann 1 Little) Bishop and grandson of Jacob 
and Mary A. (Weedman) Bishop. His 
grandfather died in McLean county at the 
advanced age of ninety-three years, and the 
grandmother at an advanced age. She was 
a daughter of George and Charlotte Weed 
man. and was born in Pennsylvania. At 
an early da\ she removed with her parents to 
Perry county, Ohio, and from there came 
to McLean county, Illinois. On the 10th 
of May, [821, -ho gave her hand in mar- 
riage t<> facob Bishop, and at the time of 
her death had thirteen children, eighty 

grandchildren and five greal grandchildren. 
She was a devout Christian. Her children 
were Sarah Ann. Charity, George, Jacob. 
Anna ML, Charlotte, Fletcher, John S., 
Elizabeth, Asbury M.. Joseph, Harriet and 
I lannah. 

Jacob C. Bishop, the father of Charles 
\\'.. is Mill living in Heyworth, McLean 
county. His wife died at the age of forty- 
five years. They were the parents of nine 
children, namely: John \\\. Mary Ellen, 
Alice. Fremont, Charles \\\. James. Emma, 
Fanny and Sanford Dick. 

Charles W. Bishop was reared upon the 
home farm and educated in the common 
schools of the neighborhood. In 1890 he 



went to Weldon. Illinois, where he spent 
one year, and then located on the old Rut- 
ledge homestead, where he still lives, his 
time and attention being devoted to the op- 
tratioii of the farm. lie married Miss Mar- 
tha I). Turner, a daughter of Dennis and 

Martha J. (Rutledge) Turner, whose sketch 
appears elsewhere in this work. Her ma- 
ternal grandfather was William J. Rut- 
ledge, mentioned in the preceding sketch. 
The children born to Mr. and Mrs. Bishop 
were Fred \\ .. Mary A.. Homer A., Alice 
II . ; Charles D., who died at the age of four 
mi 'in h-. ; and Ralph L. The father is a 
member of the Cumberland Presbyterian 
church, while the mother is a Methodist in 
religious belief. Socially Mr. Bishop affili- 
with the Masonic fraternity and the In- 
endenl < >rder of < >dd Fellows at LeRoy. 
In his political views he is a Republican, and 

he has filled the office of school director. 



GE< >RGE FRANKLIN HUFFMAN, 

Among the heroes who helped to lib th< 
yoke "f English oppression from the shoul- 
ders of the Colonists during the Revolution- 
ary war. was the paternal great-grandfather, 
Christian Huffman, who was born in Penn- 
sylvania, and there lived for many years. 
Added to his service of four and a half 
years under the banner of Washington, was 
an equally meritorious and courageous serv- 
ice in the war of iNij. when he fought for 
eighteen months after his removal to Vir- 
ginia. What was most remarkable was the 
fact that during both of the conflicts he was 
neither wounded or captured, or laid up in 
the hospital. Both himself and wife, who 
was formerly a Miss Cole, of Virginia, lived 
to an advanced age, and reared to usefulness- 



Till-: BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



101 



a family of eight children, of whom S 
mon, the paternal grandfather, was Ix.rn in 
Virginia, and carried "ii farming enterpris 
in Pendleton county, where lie died in i> 
at the ghty-one year-. The mater- 

nal grandparents of <i F. Huffman, John 
•li (Henslej i Vance, were born, 
red and married in Virginia, and eventu- 

removed t going from then 

rmilion county, Illinois. When but a 
few months in the Illinois home disaster 
rcame the family through the death of 
the grandfather, who accidentally shot him- 
while cleaning a ritle. his death follow- 
in four da - S :er his 
widow. Elizabeth (Westfall) Huffman, and 
children ren 1 )e\Virt county. Illii 
where the former died at the ad vane 

cight\. at the home of hei melius. 

ind Elizabeth (Vance} HurT- 
n, the parenU c Franklin, are 

respectively, of Pendleton county, 
Virginia, and Athens county. < rtiio, the for- 
mer ha born August 4. 1833. The 
lather removed to McLean county, Ellin 
•1 after reaching his majority, and after 
settled in Rutledge township, DeWitt 
inty, where lie became "lie of the promi- 
nent and substantial farmer- county. 
The children born into the family are: Al- 
vin \V., who is represented on another p 
•his work; Sophronia, who is now Mr-. 
' 1 . a -ketch of whom 
will l>e f( und on another rd; 
F. : and Nora, who is the 
- E. Holmes George Franklin 
red and I in Rul in- 
side from the education acquired 
in the publi ended for a term the 
X. I C. Normal school, at Dixon. Bef 

lining his majority he combined with his 

father in the purchase of a farm ■•!' one hun- 

1 and til' in Santa Anna township. 



unty, his interest being disp 

of to hi> father at a later day. He then pur- 

1 farm of two hundred a< 
lion x> ion town-hip. Piatt county, 

which ill) operated for four 

1 ill own-, and which ha- pn 
a most remunerative and satisfactory invest- 
ment. In December, i</oo. he located in 
Idon and engaged in the horse excha 
livery business, in which he is -till suc- 
sfully interested. Hi- public spirit has 
found an outlet in vario - within the 

gift of the people, all of which ha 

ith satisfaction to all concerned. 
He i- a Democrat in politics, and ha- Keen 
prominent in political affairs lx>th in Piatt 
and DeWitt couties. He is a member 
the United Brethren church. 

February 11. iN'>7. Mr. Huffman 1 
ried Emma L., 'laughter of William and 
Elizabeth Riley, of Wilson township, De- 
Witt county. Of this union there 
daughter. Verna Belle. 



REUBEN CLEARWATERf. 

Reuben Clearwal j prominent con- 
tractor ami builder of Farmer City, is the 
-on of Nathan Clearwater^, the honored 
founder of that place. Hi- paternal grand- 
father wa- Reuben Clearv > 
North Carolina, who went to Tei 
early life and there married lane Miller, 
who wa- ln.rn on the south branch of the 

mac in Virginia, and removed with her 

parents to Tennessee at an early da} In 

this worthy couple, accompanied by 

their children, emigrated t.. Highland coun- 

Ihio, where they -pent the followii 
ami then remov< inklin county, 

Indiana. Later the\ lived m M 



102 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



Putnam counties, that state, for a time, and 
in 1830 removed to Vermilion, Illinois, and 
two years later to Buckle Grove, .Mel. can 
county, where our subject's grandfather 
took up a large tract of land. He also en- 
tend land in DeWitt county, at one time 
owning the II. Huddleston farm, but he 

spent his last days in McLean county, where 

he died in [866, at the age of eighty-five 
years, his wife in 1864, at the age of sev- 
enty-two, and both were buried in the Le- 
Roj cemetery. They were active members 
of the Methodist Episcopal church, and held 

3-meetings at their home. The grand- 
father was also an active member of the 
.Stui-. of Temperance. Ilis children were 
John, Nathan, Mrs. Susan Westfall, Mrs. 
M.ilinda Royston, Mrs. Elizabeth Huddle- 
ston, Dr, Jacob Clearwaters, Mrs. Jane 
Kimbler and Dr. Reuben Clearwaters. 

Nathan Clearwaters. the father of our 
subject, wa- horn in Greene county. Tennes- 
May 7. (807, and accompanied his par- 
ents on their various removals during his 
boyhood and youth, receiving fair educa 
tional advantages for those days. On the 
7th of August, [828, he was united in mar- 
riage with Miss Mary M. Danner, who was 
born in Harrison county, Indiana, Novem- 
ber 29, 1812. Her parents, John and Cath- 
erine (Zenor) Danner, wen pioneers 
of 1 >e\Vitt county, where their deaths oc- 
curred. Their children were: Absalom, 
who was married in [837 1. 1 I.ucretia ( '< wc\ , 
this being the first wedding performed in 

ta Anna township; Allen B. ; John Z. : 
Samuel: Rachel: David; William: Isaac; 
Catherine: and Mary M. The children 
born to Mr. and Mrs. Clearwaters were as 
foll6ws: Jane, who died at the age of six 
years and was the first person buried at 
Farmer City; William I... who died at the 
age of eight years: John W.. who died at 



the age of twenty-two; Malinda, wife of J. 
Griffith; Absalom, a resident of Kansas; 
America, wife of M. E. Knight; Perlina R., 
who died at the age of twenty: Patton, who 
died at the age of ten: Reuben, our subject; 
Allen, who died at the age of fifty ; and Pat- 
ton W., a residenl of Farmer City. 

After his marriage the father of our sub- 
made his home in Vermilion county, 
Illinois, until (832, when he removed to 
what is now Santa Anna township, DeWitt 
county, hut at that time formed a part of 
McLean county, ami he entered land on sec- 
tion 28, where Farmer City now stands. 
\t that time he squatted and built a log 
cabin near the present home of J, Q. Jones, 
but three or four years later creeled a good , 
two story, hewed log house where the mar- 
hie works are now located al the south end 
of Main street. There he opened a hotel 
for the entertainment of the emigrants on 
their way west, it being the first hotel in this 
section of the state and the only one for 
miles around. Although a rude structure, 
it was a pleasant home for all, where the 
corn was converted into sweet pone cakes 
and thoroughly relished by the passing trav- 
eler. After conducting this hostelry for 
four years, Mr. Clearwaters was succeeded 
by William McKinley, and then built a. 
house where Stephen Covey now lives. In 
1.851 he bought the John Danner property, 
on Clinton avenue, owned to-day by 0. J. 
Smith, and there made his home until his 
death, which occurred December 30, 1SS4. 
lie turned the first furrow where the city 
now stands, and later helped to la\ "tit the 
town, his wife giving it the name of Mt. 
Pleasant, which was later changed to Farmer 
City. She died December 25. iS.SC For 
half a century they were prominently 
identified with the development and up- 
building of this locality, and their names- 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



103 



should l>c among the foremost in the roll of 
DeWitt county's honored pioneers. 

Reuben Clearwaters, of this review, was 

born on the <>1<1 Covey farm in Santa Anna 
township, May 17. 1847, ;u,( ' followed 
farming until [870, when he took up car- 
penter work, and since 1S75 lias succei 
fully engaged in contracting and building, 
erecting many of the private residences and 
business blocks in Farmer city. He gives 
employment t<> many men, often having a 
[ eight. In [873 he purchased a 
large l"i in Huddleston second addition, and 
erected thereon a house and work-shop, has 
set out shade and fruit trees, making it 1 
most attractive home. In 1SS1 lie and his 
In-other Wesley bought the Public Reaper, 
which they published at Farmer City for a 

r, and then sold to R. M. Ewing, who 
Conducted it for the same length of time. 
The paper was then changed to the DeWitt 
1 unty Republican, and is now published at 
Weldon, this county, as the Weldon Record. 

Mr. Clearwaters was married May 31, 
1870, to Miss Catherine Danner, a daugh 
ter of Jacob Danner, of Louisville, Ken- 
tucky, and to them were horn five children: 
Carrie A., who died at the age of three years ; 
J. Allen, who died at the age of twenty-one; 
and Clarke E., Lester A. and George, who 
are all working with their father. 

Mr. Clearwaters is a prominent mem- 
ber of several civic societies. In [872 he was 
made a Master Mason and a charter member 

Lodge No. 710. at Farmer City, of which 
he is past master. He is also a charter 
member and past officer in the chapter. R. 

M.: became a charter member of the 
Knights of Pythias Lodge in [875, and 
served as chancellor eleven consecutive 
terms, lie i~ also a member of the Rath- 
lone Sisters, an auxiliary of the latter or- 
der. He is a member of the Independent 



Order of Odd Fellows; served as grand 
high priest of his lodge four terms, has tilled 
all the chairs in the encampment, and is a 
member of the Rebekahs. lie is also a 
member of the Golden Eagle and deputy of 
the supreme chapter of the state: and i- 
nected with the Loyal Sons of America. 
During the existence of the \ii.'(\ Men's 
lodge in Farmer City he was a member of 
that order, and with the Good Templars 
when in vogue here. In his religious views 
Mr. Clearwaters is liberal, and in politics is 
a. stalwart Democrat. He has always taken 
great interest in public affairs, and has prob- 
ably done more than any other one man to 
advance the welfare of his city. He has 
served five years as alderman of the ward 
m which he resides, and he is pre-eminently 
public-spirited and progressive. 



GEORGE \V. SMIT 



George \V. Smith, an energetic and pro- 
gressive business man of Waynesville, now 
dealing in grain, is one of DeWitt county's 
native sons, his birth having occurred in 
Barnett township. July 27, [864. His fa- 
ther. Charles R. Smith, was horn in Gibson 
county. Indiana, about [838, an ' on 
reaching manhood was there united in mar- 
riage with Miss Mary Marvel. They con- 
tinued their residence in Gibson county, In- 
diana, until after the birth r>f two of their 
sons, and then came to DeWitt county, Illi- 
nois. Purchasing a farm in Harnett town- 
ship, the father devoted the remainder of 
his life to its improvement and cultivation. 
and died there in [891. His wife still sur- 
vives him. In their family were seven s. ,ns 
and three daughters, all of whom grew to 
man and womanhood, and four s, ,ns and 



104 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



two daughters arc living at the present 
writing, in 1901, and are heads of families. 

The early life of our subject was passed 
Upon the In 'ine farm, and his education was 
acquired in the district schools of the neigh- 
borhood. B) assisting in the work of the 
farm he soon became thoroughly familiar 
with all the duties which fall to the lot of 
the agriculturist, and after reaching man- 
hood he had charge of the place for several 
years. One year he was engaged in the 

m business al Midland City, and from 
there he eame to VVaynesville and purchased 
an interest in the already established hiiM- 
r.ess of Baxton Marvel, being associated 
with him for live years. In the spring of 
.'-I he bought the elevator of E. W. Mar- 
vel, and is now doing a successful business 
dealer in grain. 

Mr. Smith was married near Beason, 
Illinois, in [884, to Miss Susan E. Ke 
who was born in I 'ike county, Illinois, but 
was reared in Logan county. She died in 
September, 1899, leaving five childr< 
namely: Mary E. ; Lottie 1. : Wilbur; Lu- 
cile:and Helen. On the 23d of May, 1901, 
in VVaynesville township, this county, Mr. 
Smith was again married, his second union 
being with Miss Kate Hammitt, a native of 
1 leWitt county. His home is a large mod- 
ern residence, which has ]\--\ heeii com- 
pleted, is heated by steam and tastefully 
furnished. 

Since attaining his majority Mr. Smith 
has affiliated with the Democratic party, and 
cast his first presidential ballot for Grover 
Cleveland in [888. He has efficiently 
served on the town hoard ami was presi- 
dent of the same one year, but he has never 
been a politician in the sense of office sack- 
ing. Both he and his wife are members of 
the Tabor Methodist Episcopal church, and 
he is also a member of Waynesville Lodge, 



Xo. 172, E. & A. M., in which he is now- 
serving as senior warden; the Independent 
Order of odd Fellows at Waynesville; and 
the Modern Woodmen tamp, of which he 
has been hanker for three or four years. 
I lis strict integrity and honorable dealing in 
business commend him to the confidence of 
all; his pleasant manner wins him friends; 
.ud he is one of the popular and honored 
citizens of Waynesville. 



DR. EDWARD PORTER (Deceased). 

( »h March 1st. [879, there passed away 
from his home in Clinton a well beloved 
physician, whose man) years of faithful toil 
in his profession made his name a house- 
hold word in that community. Nor had his 
influence and efforts been confined to pro- 
fessional lines only, for in all the varied ac- 
tivities of ntn common life he had taken a 
helpful part as a loyal citizen, devoting his 
abilities to the cause of progress, Dr. Porter 
was a man whose death was felt as a loss 
among all classes and the following brief 
account of i,ne so esteemed will he read 
with unusual interest. 

I >r. I'orter was a native of ( )li i. . and was 
horn at Sinking Springs, Highland county, 
February <>. [833. His father. George 
Porter, was horn in Pennsylvania, hut when 
a child came to ' Mi 10, w here he grew to man- 
hood and foil,, we, 1 the pursuits ,,f a farmer. 
Here he married Miss Eliza Lee Lowe, 
daughter of John W. I. owe and a second 
cousin t,. Robert I-".. Lee. They reared a 
family of three children, as follows: — Ed- 
ward, whose name heads this review ; John 
\\\. of Clinton, .and L. Josephine, who mar- 
ried Isaac X. Tully, a physician of Red 
Cloud, Nebraska. In [852 George I'orter 




EDWARD PORTER, M. D 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL Kl-.O »KD 



107 



came with his sons to DeWitt county, [Hi— 
nios, where he purchased a farm in Barnett 
township. Where he spent his remaining 
days, dying in 1859, at the age <>t' fiftj 
years, his wife attaining the age of seventy. 
Hi- >i <ti John, who is now living retired in 
Clinton, served from 1861 to [865 in Com- 
pany I".. Twentieth Illinois Volunteer In- 
fantry, and was promoted to second lien- 
tenant. 

In the place of his nativity Edward 
Porter spent his boyhood days and attended 
the common schools, lie was an industrious 
lad and eager to obtain a good education. 
spending all his leisure time in reading the 
best literature. When seventeen year- of 
he began teaching, oftentimes having pupils 
older that himself. In 1N51 he first began 
the study of medicine and in [852 he came 
to DeWitt county. Illinois, with hi- parents. 
The following ten year- he devoted to farm- 
ing and continued the study of medicine dur- 
ing his spare time. In 1862 he enlisted in 
the One Hundred and Seventh Illinois \ 
unteer Infantry, in which he faithfully 
served for two year-, at the end of which 
time he was discharged for physical dis- 
ability. On his return to DeWitt county, 
in [864, he was nominated by the Repub- 
lican party to till the office of county treas- 
urer. and at the ensuing election he was 
elected by a large majority and re-elected in 
1866. The next two year- were -pent on 
the farm, and in the whiter of 1868 he at- 
tended a course of medical lectures in the 
Homeopathii f Pennsylvania, in 

Philadelphia, and in the spring of [869 he 
graduated with horn 

( >n his return to Clinton, he bought the 
practice of Dr. Mitchell and soon became 
one of the leading physicians of DeWitt 
county. He was a man of great force of 
character and strong prejudice, yet the warm 



impulses of hi- nature made him a gener- 
ous enemy while he wa- the truest of friends. 

Whatever he believed wa- right, he believed 

with his whole soul, and gave hi- convic- 
tion the full strength of hi- manhood. 

( >n June 18, [856, he wa- united in mar- 
riage with Mi-- I.ucv E. Mill-, whose father 
was one of the early settlers of | kWitt coun- 
ty. As a result of this union the following 
named children were horn: Chancey II., of 
Lincoln, Illinois; George 1'... of South Da- 
kota: Mrs. Susan II. 'Wilson, county super- 
intendent of schools, of Clinton, Illinois; 
Mrs. Lucy E. Turner, of Lincoln. Illinois; 
J. Guernsey, a practicing physician of Clin- 
ton. In the spring of [888, he wa- L, r radu- 
ated from the Clinton high school and was 
then associated with the American Expn 
Company, of Springfield, Illinois, but 
later promoted to messenger and served in 
that capacity until [895. I lav ins; devoted a 
great deal of time to the study of medicine, 
he entered the Chicago Homeopathic Medi- 
cal College, where lie was graduated in [899. 
He at once came to Clinton where he has 
already built up a lucrative practice, and is 
fast reaching the degree his father held in 
the science of medicine, lie i- a member of 
DeWitt I, dge V F. & A. M.. Goodbrake 
Chapter and Clinton Council, all of Clinton. 
He i- also a member and examining physi- 
cian of the Modern Woodmen. Forest* 
Court of Honor, Ancient Order of United 
Workmen, and Loyal Sons of America. 
Giles G., a physician in Warren. Arkan- 
i- the next in order of birth; Mr-. Eliza I. 
Gatchell; Mr-. Nellie I". Owen, and the 
youngest member of the family i- Freddie 
A., a teacher of Clinton. 

Dr. Edward Porter was an ardent sup- 
porter of tin- men and measures of the 1 
publican party ami in religion wa- a firm 
believer in the teachings of Swedenb 



ioS 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



A vigorous writer, he could ably defend his 
professional and religious views. His 
morality was of the highest type and his 
voice and influence was at all times on the 
side which favored and upheld good govern- 
ment. 



ANDREW M. PETERS. 

Andrew M. Peters is one of the highly 
respected citizens of DeWitt pounty, and 
owns and occupies one hundred and twenty 
acres of rich farming land located on - 
tions (j and 4. of Texas township, his resi- 
dence being on section 9; He was born in 
Hamilton county, Ohio, April 23, [824, and 
is i son of John and Hannah (Trulinger) 
Peters, the former of whom was a native 
of Vermont and the latter a native of Mary- 
land. John Peters moved into ( »hio whei 
young man and engaged in farming in 1 1am- 
ilton county, where he remained until lie re- 
moved west. For the last twenty years of 
lis life he was an invalid am! died in 1870, 
in Cincinnati, < mio. When our subject was 
about four years old his parents moved to 
Indiana, but they remained there only one 
-on, moving then to (."lark county, Mi- 
is, where Andrew was reared. The 
mother remained on the farm in Clark 
county until our subject had reached ma- 
turity, when it was sold, and this devoted 
son purchased a small farm for her. erected 
:• comfortable residence, and there she lived 
until her life ended at ahotit the age of 
sixty-five years. She was the mother of 
seven children and lived to see all hut two 
pass out of life. Although many sorrows 
fell upon her. she was ever a devout member 
of the Methodist church, and many experi- 
. ced her kindness and she was universally 
beli ived. 



Andrew M. Peters obtained his early ed- 
ucation in Clark county. Illinois, and grew 
up working ami superintending the home 
farm. In 1S51 he came to DeWitt county, 
locating in Clintonia township, where he 
rented a farm of eighty acres, and lived upon 
it for two years. He then moved into 
Texas township, on a farm of eighty acres. 
and continued to operate that for the suc- 
ceeding two years and then purchased his 
1 resent home, which consisted of fort} acres, 
;.ml to this he subsequentlj added eighty 
At the time of purchase this was all 
wild land, and the first forty acres cost him 
two dollars and fifty cents per acre. This 
he cleared of timber and broke up the land, 
then built a house and made his home, tak- 

.i pardonable pride in it when completed. 
tin January 1. [864, lie was obliged to see 
the little home and all its valued contents de- 
stroyed by lire. This disaster would have 
discouraged a weaker man. hut Mr. Peters 
was made of sterner stuff, and with added 
energ) went to work amidst the ruins, built 

evv house, erected a tine barn and made 
improvements in every way. which has con- 
verted the wild land into a productive and 
valuable farm. 

Mr. Peters is a consistent membet 
the (Jniversalist church. In politics he has 
been ever an old Jeffersonian Democrat. 
He was made one of the first road rnmmiv- 
sioners in this township after its organiza- 
tion, and under his supervision almost all 
the roads have been laid out. He held this 
important office for some fourteen year-, 
was also constable at one time, and for many 
years served on the school hoard. Although 
he has never desired any active part in the 

political life of the neighborh 1. he has 

always been public-spirited and has been an 
.-dvocate of men and measures where he 
could see the community would he benefited 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RED »RD. 



109 



by their advancement. Since 1862 he has 
been connected with the odd Fellows. 

Tlie first marriage of Mr. Peters w; 
January 17. [847, to Miss Sarah Ann Oker- 
son, who was born in Kentucky. She died 
in 1878, at the home in Texas township, at 
the age of fifty-four year-. Her religious 
connection was with the Baptist church, and 
she was buried in Texas township, in the 
Hill burying ground. She left no children. 
The second marriage of Mr. Peters was in 
[878, to Mrs. Adeline Deakoff, the widow 
of Frederick Deakoff, and the daughter of 
J..hn Giechee, who was a native of Ger- 
many, dying there some twenty years 
on his farm. No children have been born 
ti Mr. and Mrs. Peters. 

When Mr. Peters first came to DeWitt 

county it was nearly all wild land, timber 

prairie, and his was the fourth house 

that was built in the northwestern pan of 

a- township. He has witnessed nearly 
all the county changes from this wild si 
to its present highly cultivated condition; in 
fact, he is one "t" those who have helped to 
brint^ the change about. When this pioneer 
came to the county there were but two grain 
mills in this township, one in the east part 
called the Smallwood mill, which had been 
built by a man by the name of Fordyce, at 
a very early day. and this was later used 

carding mill as well. This mill was 

tn \rd some years ago — an old landmark 

e, — but a notice of it will bring recol- 

ion tn many of the older residents who 

re obliged to travel many mile- to reach 

it. The other mill was in the south part of 

the township and was called the Wilson 

Allen mill. located just where the Illinois 

tral Railroad now 1 Salt creek, 

and it suffered destruction when the rail- 

I was built. Another interesting remi- 
- i- that Mr. Peters ran the first 



threshing-machine that was brought into the 
Count)', and continued its operation for 

.teen years. I lis first machine 
called "Buffalo Pit," anil the second one, 
"Massillion." He also ran the first binder 
in Texas township, and the first reaper, be- 
ing the most progressive among his farmer 
neighbors, among whom he was regarded 

1 wonder, ami the) came long distai 
to sci- him manage these wonderful con- 
ti ivai 

Mr. Peters has rented his farm, retain- 
ing only a small portion, which he mana§ 
himself, as he is very active and enjoys the 
exercise, lie is a self-made man and has 
always enjoyed the respect and esteem of 
his fellow citizens, which they displayed in 
'die offices in which they have called him 
serve. 



GEI >RGE 11. BR< >\\ X. 

e of die most enterprising and thrifty 

farmers of Wapella township i- George II. 
Brown, whose home is on section _>;. A 
native of Illinois, he was horn in McLean 
county, on the 5th of October, 1854. His 
father. John Brown, was horn in Ohio in 
1817, but moved to Kentucky in childhood 
and there grew to manhood and married 
Miss Melinda Tolle, also a native of that 
State, where they continued to make their 
home until after the birth of two of their 
children. About [852 they came to Illinois 
-.tiled in McLean county, where the 
father engaged in farming on rented land 
for a few years, and then purchased one hun- 
dred anil eighty aires win I his ~,,ns 
now resides. This was a wild tract, entirely 
unimproved, hut he s, h m broke and i< 
it and later added to it a trad of eighty 
I le erected a u 1 r< sub- 



'IIO 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



stantial barns and outbuildings, tiled the 
land and set out fruit and shade trees, mak- 
ing it a very attractive and desirable place 
His last years were spent in ease and retire- 
ment at Wapella, where he died in April, 
[898, being laid to rest in Sugar Grove cem- 
etery, llis wife is still living— a hale and 
hearty old lady of seventy-seven years — and 
Continues to make her heme in Wapella. In 
their family were six children, namely: 
Elizabeth, wife of George W. Woy, of Clin- 
Lon ; Mary, wife of Rufus Wilson, of Wa- 
pella : < ie >rge 1 1 .. 1 »ur subject ; I >a\ is, a resi- 
dent of Farmer City; Eliazor, who is oper- 
ng the old home farm; and Belle, wife ol 
Merrick Davis, of Seymour, Texas. 

George II. Brown was educated in the 
home school and remained under the par- 
ental roof, aiding in the work of the farm. 
until reaching man's estate. On the 30th 
of September, [895, he was married in De 
Witt county to Miss Carrie Moreland, who 
was born, reared and educated in the city of 
Clinton and successfullj engaged in teach- 
ing prior to her marriage. Her father. John 
\. Moreland, was originally from Pennsyl- 
vania, and was an early settler of Clinton. 
Our subject and his wife have one son, 
< ierald. 

\fter attaining his majority Mr. Brown 
rented land for several years and success- 
fully engaged in its operation, but prior to 
his marriage he bought his present farm of 
one hundred and sixtj acres on section 25, 
Wapella township, DeWitl county, and has 
since devoted his time and energies to its 
improvement and cultivation. He has 
erected a good set of buildings, and the 1 
and thrifty appearance of the place plainly 
indicate-- his careful supervision, lie raises 
a good grade of stock, and in all his under- 
takings is meeting' with g 1 success. 

Like his father. Mr. Brown is an ardent 



Republican, having never failed in his alle- 
giance to that party since casting his first 
presidential vote for Rutherford B. Hayes 
in [876. lie served as road commissioner 
■i\ consecutive years, and is now tilling- the 
office of school trustee. Both he and his 
wife are active members of the Long Point 
Methodist Episcopal church and of the 
(.burcti auxiliary societies, and he is now one 
"f the church stewards, and Mrs. Brown is 
i ssistant superintendent of the Sunda) 
school. Fraternally he is a member of Wa- 
pella Lodge, No. -'55. 1. O. O. F., and has 
tilled all the chairs, being past grand at the 
present time. Upright and honorable in all 
the relations of life, he has the confidence 
. nd esteem of his fellow citizens, and is held 
ill high regard by all who know him. 



ROBERT BLACK. 



We are now permitted to touch briefly 
upon the life history of one who has retained 
a personal association with the affairs of De- 
Witt county for forty five years, llis life 
has been one of honesl and earnest endeavor 
and due success has not been denied him, 
so that he is now one oi the prosperous citi- 
zens of Harnett township, his home being on 

tion 32, adjoining the village of Midland 
City. 

A natiw of Ohio, Mr. Black was born 
in Logan county, thai state. March 20, 1835, 
and is a son of James and Nancy 1 Powers) 
Black. llis father was horn in the north 
of Ireland of Scotch-Irish ancestry, and was 
a child when brought to the new world by 
his father, Alexander Black, one of the pio- 
neers of Pennsylvania and who lived to the 
remarkable age of one hundred and four 
years. Our subject's maternal grandfather 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



i ii 



;ils« > reached an advanced age, being ninety- 
one ai die lime of his death. James Black wa- 

reared in Pennsylvania, and there married 
Miss Nancy Powqrs, a name of that state. 

At an early day they crossed the Cumber- 
land mountains on horseback ami settled in 
Logan county, < mio, being numbered among 
the pioneers of that locality. The father 
first purchased a small piece of land, t" 
which he subsequently added until he had 
cue hundred and fifty-six acres, which is 
now owned and occupied by his son. < Hiver 
S. Black. In the family were ten children, 
•f whom are still living, namely: Will- 
iam, a resident of Iowa: Oliver S., who Ii 
near the old homestead: Henry, who lives 
with, our subject; Robert, of this review: 
Mrs. I.etitia E. Short, a resident of Belle- 
fontaine, Ohio; and Mrs. Nancy E. Huber, 
of Noble county, Indiana. 

Our subject, who was the seventh son in 
this family, used to aid his. mother in the 
household work and in spinning during his 
boyhood. He also worked with his father 
in the fields and attended school during the 
winter months, when his services were not 
needed at home. In 1856 he came west, ar- 
riving in DeWitt county. September 8. and 
here he worked as a farm hand for about 
two years. 

Mr. Black was married in this county 
June 10. 1858, to Mr-. Margaret Humphrey, 
a native of Madison county. Ohio, and a 
daughter of Samuel NfcClinans, with whom 
-he came to Illinois in childhood. They be- 
came the parents of five children, of whom 
four are living: Curtis L. is married and 
follows farming in this county: Mary Ma- 
tilda is the wife of William C. Wallace, of 
Midland City: Joseph E. i- also married and 
is engaged in farming in this county; Rachel 
- lied at the age of two years: David M. i- 
married and helps carry on his father's farm. 



Besides their own children Mr. and Mr-. 
Black have, out of the kindness of their 
heart-, given homes to four other-, three 
girls, who were aged four, five and eleven 
year-, respectively, when they came to live 
with them. All are now grown and married 
and the boy i- also grown. 

For one year after his marriage Mr. 
Black wa- engaged in farming on rented 
land, and then removed to his present place. 
which was a farm of two hundred and forty 
acre-, belonging to his wife. To the im- 
provement and cultivation of this farm he 
has devoted the greater part of his atten- 
tion ever since. There are two houses, barns 
and outbuildings upon the place, and every- 
thing is in first-class condition. Mr. Black 
also owns an adjoining farm of one hundred 
and twenty acres, and has one hundred and 
ten acre- of timber land, besides other prop- 
erty. For about ten years he wa- success- 
fully engaged in buying and shipping stock, 
and now gives considerable attention to the 
breeding of standardised road horses, in 
which he also ileal-. He laid out the villi 
of Midland City upon hi- farm, and for sev- 
eral years wa- engaged in merchandising 
there. Mr. Black hail no capital with which 
to begin life, and his career proves that am- 
bition, perseverance, steadfast purpose and 
indefatigable industry, combined with sound 
business principles, will be rewarded, and 
that true success follows individual effort 
only. 

In politics he has been a life-long Demo- 
crat and cast his first presidential vote for 
Stephen A. Douglas in iX<h>. He ha- been 
a delegate to state and county conventions 
of his party, has -er\ed as commissioner of 
highways; was a member of the school board 
twenty years: and president of the district 
eight years. Religiously both be and hi- wife, 
are active and faithful member- of the Mid- 



I 12 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



land City Christian church, in which he 
served as both deacon and elder, and they 
receive and merit the high regard of tlie 
entire community in which they live. 



WILLIAM BOOTH. 

William Booth, attorney at law and mas- 
ter in chancery of 1 >e\\ itt county, resid 
in Clinton, was horn on the -'4th of April, 
iNmi. m Cedarville, Greene county, Ohio. 
IM- father, John Booth, was horn in Berke- 
ley county. West Virginia, and in early life 
removed to Ohio, where he married Rosa 
Piles, a native of that state. During the 
litter part of tin- '40s he came to Illinois 
for the purpose of herding cattle <>n the wild 
prairies, driving them back to Ohio in the 
m11. Being so favorably impressed with 
the country, he moved his family to this 
state in 1N51 and settled near Waynesville. 
DeWitt county, where he purchased a parti- 
ally improved farm. After residing there 

ew years he removed to Waynesville, 
where he spent the remainder of his life. 
He died in [890, at the age of sixty-five 
years, but is still survived by his wife. \ 
continues to make her home in Waynesville. 
They were the parents of four children: 
William, our subject; Mr-. Mary Strange; 
Mrs. Nancy Williamson; and Melda. 

William Booth was only two years old 
when the family came to this county, and he 
is indebted to its public schools for his early 
educational advantages. Later he entered 
the Illinois Wesleyan University at Bloom- 
ington, Illinois, and was graduated at that 
institution in 1S74 and was admitted to 
practice law in [879. Since then he has en- 
_ed in practice in Clinton, being alone. 
with the exception of about a year, when 



'■.. S. Wan Meter was associated with him. 
i' n mi 1880 until 1892 he served a- state's 
attorney, being elected on the Republican 
ticket, and later he was appointed master in 
chancery, which office he still retains. 

In [890 Mr. Booth was united in mar- 
riage with Miss Theresa Crang, a daugh- 
ter of Richard Crang, of Clinton. She pre- 
sides with gracious dignity over their beau- 
tiful home at j<ij North Monroe street. 
During the Civil war he manifested his pa- 
triotism by attempting to enlist at each call 
for troops, hut being too small, as well as 
1. young, hi- services were always rejected 
and he was sent home until [864, when he 
accepted a- drummer hoy for Company 
1 ine Hundred and Forty-fifth Illinois \ ol- 
unteer Infantry. lie. therefore, has the 
honor of being one of the youngest soldiers 
in the late Rebellion from this state, and is 
to-day a member of the Grand \rmv Post 
of Clinton, lie ha- also been prominently 
identified with the prosperity and welfare 
1 f hi- city, and is recognized a- one of ii> 
leading citizens as well as one of its ablest 
law yers. 



JAMES WILLI \.M O IFFMAN. 

( Ine of the most prominent and progi 
ive agriculturists of DeWitl county i- the 
gentleman whose name head- this review. 
lie was born in Augusta county. Virginia, 
near Staunton, on January 8, 1842. and is 
■11 of Benjamin F. and Elizabeth 1 Swick 1 
Milan, both of whom were natives of Vir- 
ginia. In 1853 these parents settled near 
Sweetwater. Menard county. Illinois, where 
they remained two years, they then moved 
to [owa and were residents of that -tate live 
years, the father'- death occurring there in 
1858. In i860 his widow and family re- 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



■'3 



turned to Menard county, where she married 
Robert \\ . Hardin. In iSSj death again 
robbed her of her helpmate and she came to 
Nixon township, DeWitt county, where 
she has since resided. Her children 
by her first husband all grew to ma- 
turity, namely: Cornelia, now deceased; 
Maggie, deceased; James VV. ; Henry i 
Zachariah T.. deceased; Emanuel F.; 
Charles I..: and Samuel !>.. deceased. By 
her second union she became the mother of 
one sun. Thomas B. 1 lanlin. 

The grandfather of our subject was 
Christopher Coffman, a native of Germany, 
who came to Pennsylvania with his parents 
and on attaining his majority removed to 
Virginia, where he engaged in farming. He 
was twice married and became the father of 
eleven children. His demise occurred in that 
state. The maternal grandfather was Eman- 
uel Swick, a native of Augusta county, Vir- 
ginia, and of German descent. He followed 
the occupation of a farmer and in later life 
moved to [owa, where he: passed the re- 
mainder of his life. I lis wife was Miss Bar- 
bara Croft. 

As state before, the subject of this re- 
view came to this State with his parents and 
later removed to Iowa. In [860 he returned 
to Illinois with his widowed mother and in 
1873 settled in Nixon township, where he 
engaged in teaching, which profession he 
had previously followed for fifteen years in 
Menard county. He continued teaching in 
this county for ten years. In 1882 he mar- 
ried, his wife owning eighty acres on section 
[8, to which he later added seventy-two 
acres, making in all one hundred and fifty- 
two acres of well improved land. lie has 
placed it under a high state of cultivation 
and to-day has one of the best farms in this 
section of DeWitt county. 

On March 16, 18N2 he was united in 



marriage with Miss Charlotte A., daughter 
of Evan and Mary (Applegate) Barrick- 

inau. of Nixon township. Her people were 
natives of Kentucky and Indiana, respective- 
ly. As a result of this union three children 
were horn: Elizabeth Florence; James VV., 

Jr.; and Edith, who is now deceased. Mrs. 
Coffman departed this life May 25, [S 

Socially Mr. Coffman is a member of 
Mo/an Lodge, No. 96, K. of P., of Weldon. 
Politically he has at all times taken an active 
interest in the Republican party and has been 
called upon to till the office of assessor for 

thirteen years and collector of his township 
for twelve years. 



FRANK K. HARROLD. 

One of the most prominent young men 
of DeWitt count)- is Frank I-'.. Harrold, who 
is now so creditabl) serving a- clerk of the 
circuit court. He is a native of this county, 
horn near the village of DeWitt, on the 6th 
of January, [873, and is a representative of 
a prominent old family of that locality. His 
father. Jesse F. Harrold, was born in Henry 
County. Indiana. January iS. [838, and is 
a son of Eli and Carrie (Ayres) Harrold, 
both natives of Virginia. < >ur subject's pa- 
ternal great grandfather. William Harrold, 
was born in England, and on coming to the 
United States first settled in North Carolina, 
and from there removed to the Old 1' 
minion, lie fought for American independ- 
ence in the Revolutionary war. The Avrcs 
family were among the French Huguenots 
who settled in North Carolina at a very early 
dav in the development of this country. 
Their name was formerly He Ayres. In 
[842 Eli Harrold. our subject's grandfather, 
came to DeWitt county. Illinois, from Henry 



114 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



comity, Indiana, and located on the farm in 
Harp township now owned by J. F. Harrold. 
There he died at the age of eighty-four years. 
and his wife pased away at the age of fifty- 
four. They had seven children, namely: 
.Mrs. Lucinda L William-: Elicum; Mrs. 
Frances Arbogast; Alfred: Martha, who 
first married a Mr. Walters, and. second, a 
Mr. Mulkev; Mrs. [Catherine Cardiff; and 
[esse 1'". All lived to old age, and all are de- 
ceased with the exception of the last two 
named. 

Locating in Harp township Jesse F. Har- 
rold followed farming and stock-raising 
quite successfully throughout his active Imsi- 
ness life, and was one of the first breeders 
< if thoroughbred ( Chester hi igs in tin- count) , 
lie still owns a well-improved farm, lint is 
now living a retired life in DeWitt, enjoying 
the fruits of former toil. During the dark 
days of the Rebellion he laid aside all pi 
sonal interests ami enlisted in July. t86l, in 

Company F. Forty-first Illinois Volunteer 
Infantry, as a private, hut the following 

sear was commissioned captain of his com- 
pany, lie is now an honored member oi 
James Hutchinson Post, No. 201, G. A. I\.. 
of which he is past commander, and is also 

a member of Vmon Lodge, No. 261, F. & \. 

M.. of DeWitt. In early life he took quite a 

prominent part in public affairs, and in 1X74 
was elected state senator on the Independent 
Reform ticket. lie served as school treas- 
urer for the long period of thirty years. In 
[865 he wedded Miss Mary Robbins, who 
was horn in DeWitt. and is a daughter of 
Darnell F. Robbins, and by this union were 
horn five children : Lawrence, a farmer of 
Harp township: Annie, deceased wife oi L. 
E. Reed: Frank F... our subject; Ira 0., a 
merchant of DeWitt: and Maud, at home 
with her parents. The early ancestors of our 
Subject were members of the Society of 



Friends, while later they were Baptists in 
religious belief, and his parents are now 
members of the Mehodist Episcopal church. 
The early education of our subject was 
acquired in the public schools of this county, 
and he later attended the Normal College 
at Valparaiso, Indiana, where he was grad- 
uated in [893. Nc engaged in teaching for 
seven years, being principal of the schools 
of De Witt two years of that time, and then 
with his brother Ira < >. he succeeded the firm 
of Watt Brothers in mercantile business in 
DeWitt and still owns an interest in the 
Store. In [900 he was elected clerk of the 

circuit court on the Republican ticket to suc- 
ceed W. 0. Rogers, and is now filling that 
office with credit to himself and to the entire 
satisfaction of his constituents. 

On the 26th of December, 1900, Mr. 
Harrold married Miss (Hive Hammers, of 
/aiH'sv illc.i Hno. lie is a prominent member 
and past master of Anion Lodge, No. -"<> 1 , 
F. & A. M., .if DeWitt, and is aK,. a mem- 
ber of ( j. lodhrake Chapter, R. A. M. : anil 1 >i 
the Knights of Pythias fraternity, the Mod- 
ern Woodmen of America, and the Knights 
of the Maccabees. Whether in public or pri- 
vate life he is always a courteous, genial 
gentleman, and is well deserving the high 
regard in which he is held. 



|< )ll\ (,. CACKLEY. 

For many years the sub j eel of this re- 
view was one of the most highly respected 
and valued citizens of Clinton, and was 
prominently identified with her upbuilding 
and development. lie was horn in l'oca- 
hoiitas county. We.st Virginia, in 1832, and 
was a son of William and Jennie (Cay) 
Cacklev. who were also natives of that state. 




JOHN G CACKLEY. 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



117 



The father ran a general store at Hunt, 
ville. West Virginia, for many years, and 
en his retirement from active busil 
came to Clinton about 1856 to make his 
!i"ine with his >. >ns. Here lie died at the 
of sixty-eight years, and his wife at the 
of seventy. He was a soldier of the war 
nf 1812 and took part in many important 
tents. \s "iie of the leading and 
influential citizens of his community, he 
In >ncred with several important official 
sitions, being a member of the West Vir- 
ginia legislature twelve years, and sheriff of 
his county fur several terms. He also tilled 
the office of justice of the peace. In politics 
he was a supiwrter of the Democratic party. 
and in his religious views was liberal. His 
children were Robert, Mary. Leah. William, 
Hannah. Ann. Fry. A. David, John G., 
Sarah. Louise, and one who died in infancy. 

When nineteen years of age John < '•. 

kley came to DeWitt county empty- 
handed, and through his own unaided ef- 
forts worked his way steadily upward to a 
iition of affluence. He was actively iden- 
tified with a number of business enterpris 
and owned considerable real estate, includ- 
ing residence property besides his own beau- 
tiful home. He built the block now occu- 
pied by the National Bank of Clinl 
which he continued to own up to the time 
of his death, and which is now in possession 
of his son Clayburn. He purchased the 
Hickman Mills farm o£ two hundred and 
eighty acres, which is now owned and car- 
ried on by his widow. Throughout life he 
devoted the greater part of his time and at- 
tention to farming and sti >ck raising, mak- 
ing somewhat of a specialty of high grade 
cattle, and in business affairs he steadily 
prospered, becoming quite well-to-do. 

On April [3, 1858, Mr. Cackley mar- 
ried Miss Alcinda E. Cundiff, a daughter 

6 



of Thornton and Eleanor (Beatty) Cun- 
ditt. Her father, who was a native of Po- 
cahontas county. West Virginia, came to 
Clinton in 1851, and for a time conducted 
a lmtel where the Masonic block is now lo- 
cated. Later he purchased a farm near 
Farmer City, this county, ami turned his at- 
tention to agricultural pursuits. There he 
died at the age <>i fifty \ears, and his wife 
aed away at the age of sixty-two. They 
had seven children, namely.: William: John; 
Alcinda E., now' Mrs. Cackley: Sarah, wife 
of Captain James North: Mary, wife of 
James Kirk: Jennie, wife of Richard Kin- 
e; and Amanda, wife of Joseph Ranier. 
Unto Mr. and Mrs. Cackley were born six 
children: William T.. now a resident of 

Texas: Clayburn. of Clinton: Minnie, wife 
of Ernest Drake, of Lexington. Kentucky; 
Fred and liert. both of Clinton: and Cay, 
whi ' died young. 

Mr. Cackley died mi the 7th of June, 
1 Si )<>. and his funeral, which was a very 
large one, was conducted by the Independent 
< >rder of ( Idd Fellows, of which he was an 
active member. He was a great favorite 
with bub old and young, and was known 

- Uncle John by his many friends. He 
lived an upright, honorable life and com- 
manded the respect and confidence of all 
with whom he came in contact. either in bus- 
iness ,,r social affairs. Although not a mem- 
ber of any religious denomination, he leaned 
very strongly toward the Universalis! faith, 
and often attended the services of that 
church. His nature was remarkably toler- 
ant, patient and forgiving, and he was ex- 
ceedingly charitable and benevolent. His 
estimable wife, who still survives him. is 
a lady of culture and refinement, and her 
pleasant, genial manner makes her a general 
favorite. Her husband's business was left 
entirely in her hands .at his death, and 111 



i iS 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



the management of the estate she has dis- 
played remarkable aptitude for business and 
sound judgment. 



ISAAC W. THOMAS. 

This well known citizen of Farmer City, 
\vh<> for over twenty years has served as 
constable, was horn in Indiana, on the 8th 
of February, [833, and came to this county 
with his parents in 1N47. His father, Abra- 
ham Thomas, was born al Fori Brownville, 
Pennsylvania, and was a son oi Michael 
Thomas, a soldier of the Revolutionary war 
and a farmer bj occupation. The family 
came originally from Wales. The grandfa- 
ther of our subjecl was one of the early set- 
tlers of Ross county, Ohio, where he spent 
his last days, lie was twice married, his 
first wife being Elizabeth Bennett, who died 
young, leaving two children, Abraham and 
Tabitha. For his second wife he married a 
Miss Downing, by whom he had five chil 
dren, namely: Michael, William, Daniel, 
Mary and Rachel. Abraham Thomas, our 
subject's father, married Arlinda Gardner, 
a name of Pike county, ( >hio, and a daugh- 
ter of Thomas Gardner. Unto them were 
bom the following children : Michael, I ■ 
cas, Thomas G., Elizabeth, George D., Nan- 
cy, Greenbury, William. Biddy Ann, Ma- 
rion G. and Isaac W. The father served 
as an ensign in the war of iSi_\ From In- 
diana he removed with his family to De- 
Witt county. Illinois, in 1X47. and purchased 
fort) acres of Mr. Hall, it being now the 
farm of Mrs. II. Trinkle. in Santa Anna 
township, lie als,, entered an adjoining 
tract of eighty acres, hut after spending nine 
years here he S( 'Id 1 iut and went t' 1 Iowa. He 
soon returned, however, and died in this 



county in 1858, at the age of seventy-three 
years, llis wife died in 1855, at the age of 
sixty-five. 

During his early life Isaac W. Thomas 
engaged in farming ami after locating in 
Farmer City he first engaged in teaming, 
later in plastering, ami still later in contract- 
ing, hut is now practically living a retired 
life on Mast Green street, lie was married 
in [856 to Miss Elizabeth Stucky, a native of 
Fountain county, Indiana, and a daughter 
of James Stucky. She died in [893, and the 
live children horn to them — Anderson, Will- 
iam. Helen, Marion and James A., all died 
in infant 

Mr. Thomas was one of the early mem- 
bers of the Masonic fraternity in Farmer 
City, and religiously is a member of the 
Christian church. During the last twenty 
years of the nineteenth century he served as 
constable, and was again elected to that of- 
fice in [901. lie is widely and favorably 
known throughout the county, and has hosts 
of warm friends in and around Farmei City. 



CHARLES R. ADAIR. 

^mong the legal profession of DeWitt 
country are many brilliant and brainy men, 
hut to-day then- are none that stand higher 
in the esteem of the people than the gentle- 
man whose name introduces this biography. 
Although a comparatively young man he has 
rapidly forged to the front in his chosen pro- 
fession and there are few, if any. that have 
brighter prospects than Charles R. Adair. 

A native of Logan county, he was horn 
March 11, [868 and is a son of James M. 
and Sarah J. ( Barr) Adair, who at that time 
was a leading farmer of Logan county, Illi- 
nois, but who removed with his family to 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



119 



DeWitt county when our subject was a small 
child. Here he carried on farming and stock- 
raising until [896, when he returned to Lo- 
gan county, where he has taken up farming 
and where he is now residing. 

The early education of our subject was 

lined in the commi >n sch< n ils 1 if this o iun- 
ty. and was supplemented by a course in 
the Northwestern University. He then en- 
jed in teaching, which occupation he fol- 
lowed one year. At the end of that time he 
entered the Kent Law School, of Chic: 
where he was graduated in [894. Immedi- 
ately thereafter he came to Clinton, where he 

tied an office and engaged in the practice 

law for five years. In July. 1899, he 
formed a partnership with Fred Ball, and 
for -ix months they were associated 

■ther. At the end of this 
Mr. Adair took charge "f the l 
Daily and Weekly Times, which lie 
continued to edit tor one year, when he 
embarked in the practice of law. 

' 14. [895, -Mr. Adair led to 

the marriage altar Mi-- Mary A., daughter 

- town, of Easton, Illinois. As a 

f this union two children have been 

rn : Charles T. and Mary Ellen. 

Since attaining his majority Mr. Adair 
was a stanch supporter of the men and m< 
ures of the Republican party until [896, since 
which time he has voted and supported the 
principles of the Democracy and is now 

retary of the county Democratic central 
committee. In 1898 he was the Democratic 
candidate for county judge, and he has al- 
ways taken an active and influential part in 
public affairs. Upright, reliable and hon- 
orable, hi- Strict adherence to principles com- 
mands the respect of all. The place that lie 
has won in the legal profession is accorded 
him in recognition of his skill and ability, 
ami the place which he occupies in the social 



world i> a tribute to that genius, worth .and 
true nobleness of character which are uni- 
versally recognized and honored. 

Both Mr. and Mr-. Adair are active 
members of the Methodist Episcopal church 
of Clinton, and since [895 Mr. Adair has 
been a member of the official board and is 
now serving a- -tew aid. 



HENRY QUERFELD. 

Henry Querfeld, one of the substan- 
tial German-American farmers of De- 
Witt county, Illinois, was horn in llan- 
nany, February 9, [834, and 

emigrated to the United Slate- in (868. 
A happy inspiration caused him to direct his 
steps to Illinois, where for a number of years 
he farmed on eighty acre- of rented land in 
DeWitt county. He later rented a farm of 
one hundred and sixty acres in Clintonia 
township, and successfully managed and 
worked the same until his removal to Texas 
township, where he rented another farm un- 
til about twelve year- ago. He then became 
the possessor of the one hundred and sixty 
acres at present owned by him on section 17. 
Texas township, upon which he has institut- 
ed many improvements, remodeled and in- 

ised the size of the house, and added 
many needed and substantial buildings for 
general use. lie i- engaged in general farm- 
ing ami Stock-raising on a large scale, and 
has 1 >ne of the best appointed and best 
equipped farms in the county. 

The parents of Mr. Querfeld, William 
and Mary (Magers) Querfeld, were horn, 
reared and spent their entire lives in the 
fatherland, and died before their son came 
to America. There were only three children 
in the family, the sister, Minnie, having died 



120 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



two years after her brother Henry left home. 
In the meantime he has never heard from 
his brother, and is in doubt as to whether 
he is alive or dead. .May 20, [856, Mr. 
Querfeld married Christine Peters, at Mon- 
delsloh, Germany, daughter of Henry and 
Mary (Hinneman) Peters. Henry Peters 
was a fanner during the greater part of his 
life, although for sixteen years he was a 
soldier in the British army. The parents 
died in Germany, having reared a familj oi 
six children, all "i" whom with one exception 
came to America, but Mrs. Querfeld is the 
only one living now. To Mr. and Mrs. 
Querfeld have been born seven children, live 
of whom are now living: Minnie C, who 
was horn in Germany December [3, 1857, 
is now the wife of Daniel B. Stivers, of Clin- 
ton, formerly chief of police of the town for 
many year.-, and has two children. Charles 
and Waller: Sophia, who was horn in Ger- 
many Februarj _•_•. [859, is the wife of 
Jacob Hoffman, of DeVVitt township, and 
has six children. Mildred. Minnie. Frank, 
Edna, Russell and Kay. all horn in DeWitt 
township; Henry, who was born in Pcr- 
manv 1 >Ctober [8, [863, and died in his na- 
tive land January S. [865, at the age of fif- 
teen months : Mary P.. who was horn June 
[3, 1S1.7. and died in DeWitt county June 
14, [884; Frank P.. who was horn February 
_'4. 1N70. married Sarah Beckman, has orte 
child, Helen, and farms in Clintonia town- 
ship; and Hermann P.. who was horn Jan- 
uary 4. [872, is a fanner on the home pi 
was formerly president of the Christian En- 
deavor Society of Clinton, has been a deacon 
in the Christian church at Clinton for four 
years, and is fraternally a Knight of Pythias, 
and a member of Mozart Lodge, No. 96, of 
Weldon : William, who was horn ( )ctober 28, 
[877, in DeWitt county, and lives on the 
home farm. The children were all educated 



at the public schools of Germany, and De- 
Witt county. Illinois. 

Mr. and Airs. Querfeld are members of 
the Christian church of Clinton and in pol- 
itics he is a Republican, but has never cared 
f( >r < iflice. 



STONEWALL J. McNUTT. 

Stonewall J. McNutt, now a resident of 

I he village of Wapella, was for s, ,nic years 
successfully engaged in farming and stock- 
raising in Wapella township, and stills owns 
a line farm of one hundred and sixty acres 
■ n section 25. lie was born in Lewis coun- 
ty. Kentucky, November 26, [866, and is 
a s, ,n of John McNutt, whose birth occurred 
in the same county, in iS_'S. his paternal 
grandfather, John McNutt, Sr., being one 
of the early settlers of that locality. On 
reaching manhood the father married Miss 
Sarah Ann Fenwick, also a native of Lewis 
county, and a daughter of William Fen- 
wick, one of its pioneers. In early life 
John McNutt, Jr., learned the blacksmith's 
trade, and is si ill carrying on a shop at 

tageville in his native county, and also 
owns and operates a grisl mill there. Loth 
he and his wife are members of the Presby- 
terian church at that place and are most es- 
timable people. 

Mr. McNutt, of this review, was reared 
to agricultural pursuits upon the home farm 
and acquired his literary education in the 

I I uaii' in schi » ils ■ >f the neighbi irh< « >d. Leav- 
ing home at the age of twenty years he 
came to DeWitt county. Illinois, where he 
worked by the month for two years, and 
then engaged in farming for himself upon 
rented land for several years. 

At Wapella. December _>g. 1896, Mr. 
McNutt was united in marriage with Mis- 



Till-: l;lM«.k Ai'ilhAI. RECORD. 



i ji 



Elizabeth Downing, who was born and 
reared in iliis county. Her father, James 
I Downing, was one of the pioneers and 
prominent farmers of DeWitt county, hav- 
ing come here from Mason county, Ken- 
tucky, at an earl) day. For one year alter 
1 1 !•> marriage Mr. McNutt continued t" 

te rented land, and then removed to the 
ci!<l Downing homestead, where he succt 
fully engaged in farming and stock i 
ing until the fall "t" 1901, when he rented 
his farm and removed to the village of 
Wapella on account of hi^ wife's ill health, 
buying residence property at that place. 
In connection with his farming he was suc- 
'1 in raising a high grade 1 if 
k. making a specialty of I '"land china 
hogs and Polled Angus cattle. 

In his political affiliations Mr. McNutt is 
talwart Democrat and cast his first presi- 
tial ballot for Grover Cleveland, but he 
has never sought official honors. Both he 
and his wife are connected with the Long 
J'. -int Methodist Episcopal church, of which 
lie i- one of the official members and trustee, 
and they take an active part in Sunday- 
school work. They are widely and favora- 
bly known and have a host of warm friends 
throughout the county. 



JOHN M. CUNNINGHAM. 

\<>\m M. Cunningham, a prominent and 
influential farmer of Wilson township, was 
born in Washington county, Pennsylvania, 
March u. [828, and is a & <n of William and 
Elizabeth (Magee) Cunningham. His ma- 
ternal grandfather fought for American in- 
dependence as a private in the Colonial army 
during the Revolutionary war. The father 



of our subject was a native of Ireland, and 
was a small boy when he came to tln^ country 
w ilh Ins father, who was a farmer by occupa- 
tion, lie made his home in Pennsylvania 
throughout life. After his death his wife 
came to DeWitt county, Illinois, and spent 
the remainder of her life at the home of our 
Subject. Her remains were interred in the 
I lej worth cemetery. She was the mother of 
eight children, of whom si\ reached years of 
maturity, namely: John M.. our subji 
Franklin, a resident of Wapella township; 
I. ear. deceased; Jane, wife of James Petti- 
bone, of Missouri ; 1 lannah. w ife of William 

sard, of Wisconsin; and William, a r< 
dent of McLean countv. Illinois. 

During his boyhood John M. Cunning- 
ham attended school in summer and worked 
through the winter until twelve years 
at which time his education was supposed to 
he completed. lie remained at home until 
about twenty years of age, and then com- 
menced earning his own livelihood, following 
various occupations for a time. 

()u the 6th of December, 1848, Mr. Cun- 
ningham married Miss Elizabeth Buckston, 
a daughter of Jacob and Elizabeth Buckston, 
who were of German descent. By this union 
were horn eight children as follows; 1 1 ) 
William is now operating the home farm for 
his father. i _' I Adeline is the w ife of Rob- 
ert Summers, of Wapella township, and the) 
have four children: Lea; Julia, wife of 
Emery Treat, of Wapella township: Will- 
iam, a resident of Bloomington ; and Ann. 
wife of George Greene, of Wapella. i.^i 
Elizabeth is the wife of James lluhhell. -i 
Wapella township, and has se\en children, 
Lilly. Ella, hied, Cora, Nora, Abe and John. 

i.| 1 Hannah is the wife of Shirlcv (an. 
Wilsi 'ii t. .w nship, and they ha\ e ten children. 
eight girls and two boys. ranklin 

died at the age of three years. (6) Absalom, 



122 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



a resident of low a. married Jennie Ellis and 
has five children. (7) Cora is deceased. 

In [858 Mr. Cunningham came to Illi- 
nois, making- the journey by way of Pitts- 
burg down the Ohio river to Cairo, and by 
the Illinois Central Railroad to Ileyworth, 
McLean county, where he engaged in farm- 
ing on rented land for three years. At the 
end of that time he removed to section 30, 
Wilson township, when' he purchased eighty 
acre's of railroad land, and to it he subsc- 
quentlj added a tract of forty acres. This 
he placed under cultivation and improved by 
the erectii >n of a g< » id hi iuse, barn and feint's. 
converting it into a mosl desirable farm. In 
his fanning operations he lias met with 
marked success, and as his financial resources 
have increased he has added to his lauded 
possessions until he now has three hundred 
and fiftj acres of valuable farm laud in Wil- 
son and Wapella townships. 1 1 is life affords 
an example to the young in thai he com- 
menced lure without capital, but having a 
determination to succeed he industriously ap- 
plied himself until he has acquired a good 
property, and 1- now on^ of the well-to-do, 

as well as one of the highly esteemed citi- 
zens of his community. Politically Mr. Cun- 
ningham is a supporter of the Democratic 
party, and has efficiently filled the offices of 
assessor and collector in his township. lie 
and his estimable wife are both active mem 
bers of the Christian church at Long Point, 
this County, and he is now serving as one of 
Us elders. 



Jl MIX FULLER. 

One of the ablest and most successful 
lawyers of Clinton. Illinois, is the gentleman 
whose name introduces this sketch. He is 
a native of DeWitt county, horn in Rutledge 



township. May 9. 1859, and on both the 
paternal and maternal sides is of Irish de- 
scent. His great-grandfather, Daniel Ful- 
ler, St., was a native of Dublin, Ireland, 
and on his emigration to America joined 
the early settlers in Fayette county, Penn- 
sylvania, where he followed the cooper's 
trade. There the grandfather. Daniel Ful- 
ler. Jr., was horn in 1790, and in early life 
learned the blacksmith's trade, which he fol- 
lowed for a time, but later gave his atten- 
tion to farming, his home being in Greene 
county. Pennsylvania, lie married Nancy 
Whitlatch, who was born in that county, in 
1 Son, and was a daughter of William and 
Nancy Whitlatch, natives of England, He 
died in j s 7 1 . and her death occurred a year 

1. Their children were William. Daniel,. 
Barnett, David, Smith. Bowman, John and 
Jonah, all of whom reached manhood, and 
were members of the liaptist church. 

\\ illiam Fuller, the father of our subject, 
was born in Greene county, Pennsylvania, 
1)1 nary hi. [8231 and was there reared 
and educated. For six years he engaged in 
teaching school, a part of that time being 
spent in Madison county, Ohio, and during 
his vacations he bought cattle and hogs in 
Ohio, driving the former to Philadelphia, 
Pennsylvania, .and the latter to Baltimore, 
Maryland. In early manhood he was mar- 
ried in Pennsylvania to Miss .Martha Gil- 
lett, who died with her infant daughter. 
Subsequently he was again married in Madi- 
son county, Ohio, his second union being 
with Miss Rebecca Parker, a daughter of 
Solomon and Rebecca (Caskaden) Parker. 
Her father was a native of Virginia and a 
son of Aaron Parker, who was of Irish an- 
cestry and the father of five children, name- 
ly: Mrs. Betsy Lodaman, Mrs. Mary John- 
son. Solomon. Nathan and Aaron. Solo- 
mon Parker was a farmer by occupation 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



'^3 



and one of the early settlers of Madison 

county, Ohio, where he died at the age of 
fifty-five years, his wife at the age of seven- 
ty-rive. Cm., them were born the following 
children: Samuel, Harvey, Betsy, Mary, 
Eliza, Rebecca, Catherine. Martha. Rachel, 
Thomas and Solomon. The children born t<> 
William and Rebecca i Parker) Fuller were 
Daniel; David; a daughter who died in in- 
fancy: .Mrs. Rebecca J. Vance, who now 
owns the old homestead in this county: 
Thomas J.: Mrs. Josephine Mitchell; John, 
our subject; Wiliam and Sylvanus, l«>th de- 
sed. In 1848 the father came to DeWitt 
inty, Illinois, and here taught school and 
read law with E. H. Palmer, being admit- 
ted to the bar in iN<k). In 1854 he was 
elected sheriff of the county and removed to 
Clinton, where he ever afterward made his 
home, being ssfully engaged in the 

practice of his profession. For a quarter 
"\ a century he never missed a term of 
court, and his counsel was sought far and 
near. He continued to own his tine farm in 
Rir wnship and took great intei 

in improving it and also in the raising of 
thoroughbred short horn cattle and draft 
horses. He was a man of many sterling 
qualities and was thoroughly reliable in all 

- transactions. In his religious views 
he was literal, in ik ditics he was a stanch 
Democrat, and in his social relations w. 
charter meml>er of the Masonic Lodge No. 
04. of DeWitt. He died in 1894, at the 

nty-one years, and his wife departed 
this life in January. 1897, at about the same 

During his boyhood and youth John 
Fuller attended the public of this 

linty, and then took a literary course at 
the Wesleyan University at Bloomington, 
where he was graduated in iS«)i. and from 
the law department of the same institution in 



the following year. During this time, seven 
years, he worked during tin- summer months 

on the farm and used the money earned in 
that way t<> pay his own tuition. He imme- 
diately opened an office in Clinton, and the 
same year was elected state's attorney, be- 
ing the first and only one elected to that of- 
fice during the first year of practice, which 
-hows that his ability in the line of his 
chosen profession was soon widely rec 
nized. This was in the fall of [892. That 
same election Grover Cleveland carried the 
county by 28 votes, while Mr. Fuller re- 
ceived 151. And the next time he was el( 
ed McKinley carried the county by about 
1, while he was elected by a majority of 
I'll. So acceptably did he till the office that 
he was re-elected for a second term, serv- 
ing in all eight years, lie i- now succes 
fully engaged in private practice, and is 
much interested in the p of Clinton, 

where he owns considerable property, in- 
cluding a tine home. 

On January [6,1893, Mr. Fuller married 
Miss llattie L. Fields, a daughter of James. 
Fields, who was formerly a resident of 
White county, but i< now living in Wayne 
City. Illinois. Socially Mr. Fuller i> a mem- 
ber of the blue lodge, chapter ami command- 
ery of the Masonic order, the Knights 
of Pythias, the Independent Order of 

1 Fellows, and the Modern Wood- 
men of America, all <<\ Clinton. In 
1898 he was elected president of the 
DeWitt Courity Agricultural and Me- 
chanical Society, which was established in 
1854, and has given much time and atten- 
tion to promoting its interests. The Demo- 
cratic party has always found him a stanch 
supporter of its principles, and he takes 
quite an active ami influential part in public 
affair-. The place he ha- won in the legal 
profession i- accorded him in recognition 



124 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



of his skill and ability, and the place he oc- 
cupies in the social world is a tribute to his 
genuine worth. 



WILLI \M BRELSFORD. 

If one desires to gain a vivid realization 
of the rapid advance in civilization which 
the last few decades have broughl about, 
he can listen to the Stories of men. who are 
still living among us, of the early days. 
The l"t; cabin home, the still ruder school 
house, with its rough seats made oi slabs, 
its limited range of studies and its brief 
terms, arranged on a subscription plan, the 
routine of work at home, unrelieved by any 
modern devices by which machinery is made 
to do in a short time what formerly occu- 
pied the entire year,— these and many sim- 
ilar descriptions will bring up in sharp eon 
trast the advantages of today. The sub 
ject of this sketch, a venerable and highly 
respected citizen of Tunbridge township. 
has many interesting reminiscences ol the 
pioneer days, which he takes pleasure in re 
tating. 

William Brelsford was born in Butler 
county, Ohio, on the 22nd of November, 
1825, a son of Pierson and Mary 1 llntchin) 
Brelsford. both natives of Pennsylvania, but 
who moved t" Ohio, where the father en 
gaged in farming. Both passed their last 
years in that state. Of the eight children 
born to these parents, but three are now liv- 
ing: Pierson, a prominent farmer oi Butler 
county, Ohio, operating the old homestead: 
Laura, wife of Mr. Schenck. who resides in 
Butler county. Ohio, where he is engaged 
in farming: William, our subject 

William Brelsford passed Ins boyhood 
davs in Butler county. Ohio, receiving his 
education and remaining on the home farm 



until he was twenty-one years of age, when 
he commenced farming for himself. After 
four years he determined to come west, and 
in the spring of 1850 we find him at Pe- 
oria, Illinois, where he remained for several 
weeks, while waiting for an Opportunity to 
reach DeW'itt comity. There were compar- 
atively no roads at that time, hut finally, 
after a hard and tedious trip, getting off 
to break the ice many times, he reached De- 
Witt county by wagon and located in what 
is now Tunbridge township. Here he 
bouglll three hundred acres of land and hav- 
ing no money, gave three notes, the last one 
falling due at the expiration of three years, 

but befi re the tune had passed he paid the 

entire amount and had limit a g 1 home 

upon the place. At the time of his purchase 
the land was worth ten dollars an acre, but 
after he had finished improving it. he sold 
a portion at a greatly advanced figure and 
tlu- remainder he still owns. To this 
he has added until he now owns four hun- 
dred and thirty-three acres on sections 14, 
15 and 1 1. all under a high state of cultiva- 
tion, with a large and substantial brick 
home upon it. together with other good im- 
provements. < »ur subject owns other prop- 
cm in DeWitl county, amounting in all to 
about eight thousand acres under cultiva- 
tion, and upon of which he has made all the 
impn >vements. 

William Brelsford was united in mar- 
riage with Miss Lydia Rhoda Craig. Janu- 
ary [3, [848. She was a native of Butler 
county. Ohio, and a daughter of James 
Craig, also of that county. To our suhject 
and wife five children were horn, three of 
whom are still living: James E-. resides in 
Kansas, hem- an accountant in a large 
Store. He is also interested in farm land 
in that state. Everett is a farmer of Tun- 
bridge township. He married Mary Spicer 




WILLIAM BRELSFORD. 




MRS. WILLIAM BRELSFORD. 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL REG • 






and they have three children. Vivia, Lydia 
and Herbert. Charles H. is represented 
•where in this volume. Mrs. Brelsford, 
who was an earnest, consistent metnbei 
the Methodist church. lo her final 

reward on July 19, 1896, and is interred in 
the private cemetery of the family in Tun- 
bridge township. 

In his political views Mr. Brelsford ■ 
his national r Democracy, but in li 

elections for the man he considers 

qualified for the position, regardle-s of party 
lines. He has never consented t<> hold any 
office, preterm . his time to his 

tensive business int< 

interest in anything tending to improve the 
material welfare of his adopti nty. 

1". r fifl [ ears Mr. Brelsford has 

been a resident of Illinois, and is the 

few living pioneers coming to the • 
men who have witnessed it- change from a 
;1 wilderness to the most productive state 
in the union, and third in wealth and j>- >i»r.- 
lation. In the great changes that have been 
made, he has taken no inconsiderable part, 
and is justly entitled to all the honors that 
can be conferred upon one who has endured 
the trials of pioneer life. When he came to 
DeWitt county it was a- a poor man with 
- le seventeen dollars in hi- »n. 

The 'ie has achieved has not l*en the 

distance from others, but through 
his own industry, thrift and perseverance, 
and in his life the younf can 

find much worthy of emulat: 



THOMAS H. MILLER. 

Thomas H. Miller, a leading and influ- 
ential citizen of Creek township, who is now 
so efficiently serving a- supervisor, was l>orn 



in that township on the 15th of October, 

1845, and 1- a worthy rcprc-entati 
prominent old family of this count 

son of Abraham K. and Rebecca i 
1 Welch 1 Miller, whose -ketch appear- el 
where in this volume. He tir.-t attended 
the old Jack Lane school a mile and a quar- 
ter easl of the present village of Lane. This 
structure with -lab benches and 
puncheon tl. ».r. and our subject was a stu- 
dent here for only twenty- Ik- 
next pursued his studies for three months 
in a red brick school house north of Lane, 
the school ' 1 ducted on 1 no- 
tion plan then ii _ mpleted his 
education in the Clinton sch< ols and the 
Normal at Normal, Illinios. He 
then taught school in Creek township for 
ce that time has devoted 
hi- attention to fanning, starting with forty 
acre- in that township. He now opera! 
two hundred and fifty-six acres on section 
3, Creek township, while his son has chai 
of eight-. rion _'_*. 

Mr. Miller was married November 23, 
1. to Miss Mar§ in. a native of 

Ohio, in which state her parents, James and 
Barbara Glenn, were also born. During her 
childhood the family came to thi< county in 
i N 5 . j . but afterward returned t' ■ .ml 

did ni >t locate permanently here until 18 
when they settled in Harp township, where 
Mr. and Mrs. Glenn -pent the remainder • •!' 
their lives. They had fifteen children, all 
twins but three. Mr .and Mr-. Miller h 

en children, namely: Noel W., who mar- 
ried Rhoda Miller and lives in Creek town- 
ship: Tessie, wife oi Radley, of the 
same township; Emmett, Pn 
and Vesper, all at home. 

For thirty years Mr. Miller has been a 
minister of the old Christian or \ew Light 
church and has always pre gratuitioi 



130 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



ly. He lias been called to points all over 
the stau- to deliver sermons on test ques- 
tions and doctrinal points. In politics he is 
a stanch Democrat, and has heen a delegate 
to various conventions of his party. lie 
never fails to vote his party ticket at National 
elections, hut at local elections where no is- 
sue is involved he supports the hest men for 
the offices regardless of party lines. For 
the pa^t twelve years he has efficiently served 
as school trustee, and has ever taken an act- 
ive interest in educational affairs. lie is also 
rilling the office of supervisor of Creek town- 
ship in a most creditable and satisfactory 
manner, and is a member of the bridge com- 
mittee and chairman of the committee of 
abatement. As a public-spirited and enter 
prising citizen he gives a liberal support to 
all measures calculated to advance the moral. 
educational or material welfare of his town- 
ship and county, and has always heen found 
true ai:d faithful to every trust reposed in 
him. 

-*♦-• 

REV. MICH Ml. A. 1>< K ILING. 

As past i of St. Joim's Catholic church 
Father Dooling is exerting a strong inlhu 
in Clinton .and throughout DeWitt county, 
where ' dcarcd himself to many peo- 

ple through his devotion to the welfare and 
to the material as well as spiritual progress 
of those who come under his ministrations. 
lie has been pastor of the church since the 
26th of December, [890, — the first resilient 
r in Clint in. 

About twenty years ago C. II. Moore 
donated one lot in Clinton, at the cornet 
North Monroe and Macon streets to the 
Catholic society for a church. At that time 
Father Reves was resident pastor at VVapella 
and came to Clinton to hold mass in the 



homes of the memhers of the parish. A 
frame church was built facing on Monroe 
street and called St. John's Catholic church. 
The first pastor was succeeded in turn by 
lathers Met hath. Delhaur, O'Callahan, Cur- 
lew Conatey and Dooling;. 

The last named was horn in the city of 
Carlow, Carlow county, Ireland. April 11, 
[862, a son of Michael and Catherine ( Mun- 
hall) Dooling, who came to the United 
States in [862, locating in Pottsville, Penn- 
sylvania. The father engaged in railroad 
building and died June _', 1S77, at the age of 
fifty years, while his wife passed away in 

April. [898, at the age of seventy. They 

w ere the parents 1 >f ten children, six 1 if vvhi 'in 
reached adult age. 

Father Dooling was an infant when 
brought to America. lie attended the pub- 
lic schools and then entered St. Vincent Col- 
lege, at Latrobe, Pennsylvania, while later he 
was a student in St. Charles College, at Elli- 
cott City, Maryland. lit' next matriculated 
in Viatorian College, at Kankakee. Illinois, 
and after graduating in that institution lie 
was ordained to the priesthood, at Kanka- 
kee. June Hi. 1885. lie was then made pro- 
fess, ir in the ci illege and master 1 if discipline, 
being thus engaged until [890, when he was 
called to the pasti irate of St. John's church in 
Clinton, lie was resident pastor at VVapella 
for two years before locating in this city. 
When he began his labors here, there v 
only twelve families who were memhers of 
the church, hut there are now six hundred 
Souls in this parish. father I tooling also 
officiates at VVapella ill St. Patrick's church, 
which numbers seventy-five families, and he 
has remodeled ami enlarged the house of 
wroship there. 1 le established a congregation 
at VVeldon and at Kenney and in fact offi- 
ciates and holds mass for all the Catholics 
of the cminty save those at Farmer City 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



131 



ami in the extreme northwestern part of 
the county. 

He now has the plans for a modern new- 
church which is to be erected on the site of 
the old one in Ginton in 1902. It will be a 
brick edifice, modern in all its appointments 
ami beautifully decorated. It will have a 

: : 1 1 ir capacity *>i five hundred, not includ- 
ing the galleries. The parochial residence 
which occupies the corner lot was erected by 
Father Dooling and is a very hands, .me mod- 
ern home, heated by steam and supplied with 
and electric lights. He has established 
a number of societies in connection with the 
church, including the Married Men of St. 
Johi 5 ety; Young Men of St. Mich:.' 
S iety; Married Ladies of St. Monii 

. : Young Ladies Society of the Blessed 
Virgin; and the Children of Mary's Society. 
In his work he was assisted by the Rev. Fa- 
ther Jeremiah Donovan. He takes an active 
interest in the education and progressive 
movements of Clinton, is a valued citizen and 
has endeared himself to the people of all de- 
nomination by reason of ids blameless life. 

he teaches by precept as well as example. 



rOHN L. ELLIS. 



As a representative of the agricultural 

who has met witl 

in his independent calling, we take pleasure 

a brief sketch of the gentleman 

name appears at the head of this 

not: 

The birth of our subject occurred in 
Newton, Hamilton county. Ohio, May 18, 

ami he ■ if James and S 

(Curley) Ellis, who were natives of Nova 
Scotia. About 1820, they came to < >hio anil 
I land and lived the life of farmer- but 



in the fall of 1839 they moved to Mor§ 
county, Illinois, where he carried on the 
same ocupation. The mother died at about 
forty-five \cars of aye and the father at 
eighty-two. Eight children were bom 
this worthy couple, two of whom are now 
livii 

When our subject was hut twelve years 
of age he came with his parents to [llir 
remaining with them and assisting on the 
home farm until his marriage which 1 
curred September 5. 1S51. His choice was 
Miss Sarah Ann Whorton, daughter of John 
Whorton. She was a native of Illinois, ami 
her parents were 1m >th originally from Ken- 
tucky. One child blessed this union. Sarah 
Emma, now the widow of Joseph Worbur- 
ton. Mrs. Ellis's death occurred in i8« 
and her remains were interred in Concord, 
Morgan county. Illinois, and on March 25, 
1856, our subject was again united in mar- 
riage with Miss Hannah M. Funk, a daugh- 
ter of Nimrod and Eve) (Leib) Funk. She 

- a native of Morgan county. Illinois, and 
was one of twelve children. To this second 
union eight children were born, of whom 
six are now living, namely: 1 1 1 Milton G. 
resides in McLean county; 121 Susan F. 
now deceased, was the wife of Edward 
Farmer City, one son. Ralph, 

ddened their home: (3) Dora is the 
win I ('Neil, of Fanner City; 14) 

Janu-s Benton, deceased lie married 

Charles Johnson, and resides in DeWitt 
townshi] Maud become the wife of 

Colburn Hammit, a farmer in DeWitt town- 
ship: 17) Xoiiie is single and resides at 
home, she is a teacher in DeWitt township; 
Lydia als< 1 resides at hi u 
S ■!) after hi 1 marriage Mr. Ellis 

removed to McLean county, and purchased 
two hundred and forty-six acr» od 

farm land which he improved and placed un- 



132 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



der a high state of cultivation. 1 le only re- 
mained here for a short time, however, 
when he moved to Jacksonville, where lie 
spent two years. He next moved smith of 
Clinton and purchased nnu-ty acres ,it im- 
proved land, lie remained lure for four 
years, when he again made a change, trading 
the present farm for a larger one but nol 
mi highly cultivated. After three years in 
this place, he came to DeWitl township as 
a tenant mi the C. II. Moore property of 

i hundred and eighty acres and here he 
has since resided, making many improve- 
ments and placing the land in a high state 
of cultivate 'ii. 

Although he takes no active part in po- 
litical affairs, he is a linn believer in high 
protection and his ballot is always cast in 
support of the men and measures of the Re- 
publican party. I lis first presidential \ 
was cast for John C. Fremont. Socially he 

i member of the Masonic lodge and is a 

Master Mason. He has always been an ac 

live member of the Methodist Episcopal 

church. He is deservedly popular and has 

made host-, of warm friends since coming 

to DeWitt county, where he is numbered 

ammig the most valued and enterprising 

farmers. 

+~~* 

ROBERT V WVK CUMMING. 

Robert Vance Cumming, the well-known 
and popular proprietor of the Xew Com- 
mercial Hotel of Farmer City, is a native 
of DeWitt county, born in Santa Anna 
township. December n, 1838, and is a 
worth}- representative of one of its oldesl 
and most influential families, being a son 
of Rev. Paxton and I'riscilla Eliza (David- 
son) Cumming. His paternal great-grand- 
father was born in Scotland of Scotch-Irish 



ancestry, and was the founder of the family 
in America. The grandfather. Andrew M. 
Cumming, was born in Rockbridge town- 
ship. Rockbridge county. Virginia, and was 
there married and became the father of seven 
smis. namely: Paxton, James. Wiliam, 
Harvey, John. Joseph, the name of the last 
is not known, all ol whom became preachers. 
At an early day the grandparents removed 
to Tennessee and spent their last years near 
Know ille. 

Rev. Paxton Cumming. the father of our 
subject, was horn in Rockbridge county, 
Virginia, in [8oi, and was reared and edu- 
cated in Tennessee. When a young man he 

became converted to Christianity, and en- 
tered the ministry of the Methodist Epis- 
copal church. While traveling as a circuit 
rider in the Holton conference of North 
i ilina, he met Miss I'riscilla Eliza I >a 
vidson, who became Ins wife on the 27th 
of December, [828. She was horn in Hay- 
wood county, that state. September -'o, 
1X1 1 . and was a daughter of William Mitch- 
ell and Elizabeth (Vance) Davidson, the 
latter an aunt of Senator Vance. Her pa- 
ternal grandparents were William and Mar- 
garet (McConnell) Davidson. In a letter 
she wrote a short time prior to her death 
she said that the schools of her locality were 

very ] r, hut that her dear mother did the 

best she could to educate her children. She 
als, , said that she was always religiously in- 
clined, and in her sixteenth year united with 
the Methodist church mi probation, and was 
made a full-fledged member the following 
year. Mr. Cummings continued his minis- 
terial work in 'Tennessee until [835, when 
he came to DeWitt county, Illinois, to es- 
cape the baneful influences of human slav- 
ery and to rear his children among the peo- 
ple who opposed it. On his removal to this 
county, he was accompanied by his brother, 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



133 



Rev. William Cummings. He was the first 

ilar minister to locate in Santa Anna 
township, and preached 1". >r many miles 
around, services being held in log school 
houses ami dwellings. He exerted a great 
influence for good in the new settlement. 
being one of the men whose judgment was 
supreme, and was often called upon t" ad- 
\ ise his neighbors and settle disputes, lie 
brought with him to the county the tirsi set 
of blacksmith's tools ever brought to this 

tion of the state, and often assisted the 
pioneers in repairing their rude machinery. 
Mr. Cummingj bought land grants and en- 
tered land in this county, becoming owner 
of considerable property, but his life was 
mainly devoted to his religious duties Dur- 
ing the erection of the preacher's stand at 
the camp meeting grove where Mr. Mc 

rd now lives, he assisted in digging the 

• holes and thus contracted a severe cold, 
which developed into typhoid fever, from 
which lie died August 21, [839, honored and 
lected by all who knew him. In the 
spring of 1840. his widow drove hack to 
North Carolina, being familiar with the way, 

die had driven a horse and wagon on 
Coining to this state. There she was again 
married. August 21, 1842, her second hus- 
band being Rev. David White, a native of 
North Carolina, and together they returned 
to Farmer City by team. During the Civil 
war he served as chaplain of a regiment 
and later was chaplain in the regular army. 
He finally located in Lawrence. Kansas. 
where Mrs. White died March jj. 1901, at 
the advanced age of ninety years. She 
was a devout Christian, and was a faithful 
member of the Methodist Episcopal church 
for almost three-quarters of a century. She 
always took an active part in the class mi 
ings and love feasts, often speaking and 
praying in public, and conducted family 



prayers in her home half of the time when 
her husband was there and all the while 
he was away. She was a faithful attendant 
at Sunday-schools, and hundreds of chil- 
dren owe their religious teaching to her. 
By her first husband she was the mother of 
six children, Andrew M . Jane Elizabeth, 
James II.. Ruth, Celia A. and Robert \ .. 
and by her second marriage she had seven 
children, Amanda. Wilbur F., Harriet. 
Sarah. John, Etta and Emma. 

Robert V. Cummingj whose name in- 
troduces this sketch, grew to manhoood in 
DeWitt county amid pioneer scenes, and 
was educated in the public selling. \- 
the best method of obtaining money during 
his early life was by breaking prairie, he 
turned his attention to that occupation. Al- 
though he had no money his reputation 
such as to enable him to buy eight yoke of 
oxen on credit, only two of which had been 
broken. He attached one yoke of the broken 
oxen just in front of the plow and the oth- 

ahead of these, driving them as best he 
could. The plow was a rude affair made of 
iron with no handles, hut heavy enought to 
keep its place and turned a furrow twenty- 
six inches wide. Mr. Cummings hired a man 
to do the plowing at fifty cents per day. 
lie entered land on sections 5, 14 and J 1 , 
Santa Anna township, consisting of two 
hundred acres, known as the Rowland 
Wheeler tract at W eednian Station. At 
that time he usually worked sixteen hours 
per day. 

When the Civil war broke out he laid 
aside all personal interests and enlisted in 
August, iSi'j. in Company I. One Hundred 
and Seventh Illinois Volunteer Infantry, as 
a private, and was promoted to first lieu- 
tenant July 30, [865. During the battle of 
Kenesaw Mountain he was shot near the 
right eye. shattering the bone and leaving 



134 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



i<t* 



4 



a scar which will remain with him 1" his dy- 
ing day. He fell as dead and was so re- 
ported at home, but was taken to the hos- 
pital, where his eye was saved, and as SOOI1 
as possible he returned to DeWitt county. 
Mr. Cummingi continued to follow 
farming quite successfully until the 
fall of 1888, when he removed to 
Farnicri City and rented the Com- 
mercial Hotel. When it was burned 
in 1S95, he bought property and erect 
ed what is now known as the New 
Commercial Hotel, which is a brick struc- 
ture, containing thirty-five rooms with all 
modern conveniences, being supplied with 
hot and cold water, nicely furnished and 
hted by electricity. The cuisine is ex 
ceptionally good, and it is b) far the best 
hotel in DeWitt county. As a hotel pro- 
prietor Mr. CummingS has met with marked 
success and is wide!\ known as a most 
agreeable and obliging landlord. In this 
work he has been ably assisted by his 
estimable wife, who is one of the most pi 
ular ladies of the city. 

On December -7. [866, Mr. dimming^ 
married Miss JennieAnderson, a daughter 
of Mitchell and Mary (Clements) And 
son. I ler father, who was a farmer h\ 
cupation, lived for a time near Peoria, Illi- 
nois, and later near Ottawa, and died at a 
comparatively early age. I lis children were 
Amelia A., Hugh, Amanda. WxA. Hiram, 
Henry, Emma, Martha. William, Jennie 
and Mark, only four of whom are now liv- 
ing. Unto Mr. and Mi's. Cumming^ were 
horn four children: Marvin L., who , 
ried Laura Newell and is now a dentist of 
Clinton; Annie Lucile. who married Arthur 
II. Smith and has two children, Robert and 
Mainard ; Maud, who died at the age of thir- 
teen months: and H. Bert, a popular young 
man, who is now assisting his father in the 



hotel. Mr. Cumming4 is a member of the 
blue lodge of the Masonic order, and both 
he and his wife are members of the Eastern 
Star Chapter. "Phew also belong to the 
Methodist Episcopal church of Farmer 
City, and Mrs Cummingl sings in the 
choir. 



W. II. MYERS. 



One of the leading merchants and the 
popular and efficient postmaster of Lane, Illi- 
nois, is \V. II. .Myers, who was horn in De- 
Witt county, Illinois, ,111 February 4, [876, 
and is a son of Samuel and Elizabeth (Tor- 
Myers. 

Ilie origin of the Myers family was in 
Germany, hut for many generations it has 
been a leading one in the state of Pennsyl- 
vania, and in Adams county, in that state, 
on November 9, [831, Samuel Myers, who is 
the father of our subject, was horn. 1 It- 
was a son of Andrew and Elizabeth 1 Zigler) 
Myers, both of whom were natives of Penn- 
sylvania. Andrew Myers was a hatter by 
trade and carried on this business in East 
Berlin, Pennsylvania, for a number of years. 
lie moved later to DeWitt county, Illinois, 
and died there at tin- age 1 if sixt) -eight 3 ear-, 
his wife surviving him for twenty years. 
Eleven children were born to them ami Sam- 
uel was the second in order of birth. 

Previous to their settlement in Illinois, 
the parents of Samuel Myers lived for a 
time in Richland county, Ohio, and there 
the latter attended school and there learned 
and worked at the shoemaker's trade. In 
[857 he came to DeWitl county and estab- 
lished a shoemaking business, giving em- 
ployment to four assistants and continued at 
the trade until 1863, when he bought a farm 
in Creek township. For many years he de- 



Till-. liloLRAPHICAL RECORD. 



'35 



voted his attention to fanning and stock- 
raising, accumulating in the meantime a val- 
uable farm of two hundred and sixty acn 

[86l, Mr. Myers was united in 
marriage to Elizabeth P. Torbett, who w 
U. rn in Madison county, Ohio, and who v 
a daughter of Peter and Elizabeth 1". >rl>ctt . 
who were natives of Delawan en chil- 

dren were born ti> this marriage, and our 
subject. William 11. Myers is the eighth in 
order of birth. In politics Samuel Myers has 
always been a Republican, but has attended 
i ly t" hi> bn>ine>s to find time to seek 
- 

The family to which William 11. Myers 
ne well and favorably known in 
many sta U . v Nine of the eleven children 
still survive, these being, aside from himself: 
Jane, who is the wife of b>hn Farrell, a 
resident of Hamilton county, Iowa; Sher- 
man, who resides in Kansas City. Missouri; 
Lucy, who is the wife of John Mcllvenna, a 
k t. iwnship; Ida. who is the 
wife of John Stone, of Hamilton county, 
Iov t. who is a re- cek 

township; Emma, who is the wife of Harry 
Shields, of Macon county. Illinois; William 
II.. who L our subject: and Myrtle and 
. twins, the former residing at home, 
the latter living with his family in Creek 
township. 

William II. Myers received his educa- 
i in the common if DeWitt coun- 

ty, and at the age of twenty-one years he- 
ll ::i which occupation he con- 
tinued for three years. Then he purchased 
the mercantile business of J. R. Pennington, 
who was a leading merchant at Lane, Illi- 
nois, and has since that time been engaged 
in this line. All his life he has been an 
ardent Republican, although not an officc- 
• ker, his appointment being an honor con- 
ferred upon him by President McKinley on 



February [6, 1901, when he was made post- 
master at Lane. 

'ally Mr. Myers is connected with 
Gilmore Lodge, No. 455. K. of P., in which 
order he hancellor : and 

member of Lane Lamp, No. [728, of the 
order M. W. A. He is one of the energetic 
and pi mng men of this locality, 

and is regarded as a truly representative 

ell. 



1« MIX II. HUME. 



John H. Hume, whose farm is just out- 
side the corporate limits of \\ apella. ■ 
tion 35, Wapella township, is a native of llli- 

5, his birth having occurred in I 'ike coun- 
ty, on the oth of May. [843. His father, 

rge A. Hume, was born in Pendleton 

nty, Kentucky. March 4. 1809, of English 
and Scotch ancestry, and he was a lineal de- 

ndant of | >avid 1 lume, the noted English 
historian. In his native state A. 

I lume 1 d and married .V 

Melinda Hume, who was born in Grant 
county, Kentucky, and was a daughter of 
James Hume. lative of that state. 

About 1830 they came to Illinois, and : 
settled in Brown county. It was in Septem- 
ber, J £57. that the family removed to ! 
Witt county, where the father purchased 
four hundred acres of land and dly 

engaged in fanning throughout the remain- 
der of his life. 

The subject of this sketch was a lad of 
fourteen years when he located here. His 
primary education was obtained in the pub- 
lic schools of this state, and in 185Q, he en- 
tered the State Normal at Normal, Illin 
where he was a student when the Civil war 

broke out. Laying aside his text L., ,ks ho 



136 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



enlisted, October 14. [861, in Company L, 
Fourth Illinois Cavalry, which was assigned 
to the Army of the Tennessee, and he par- 
ticipated in a number of important engage- 
ments, including the battles of Fort Henry, 
Fort Donelson, Shiloh, Pittsburg Landing, 
Corinth, and Hatchie's Run; the siege of 
\ icksburg; the first battle at Jackson, Ten- 
nessee; and the Meridian campaign, besii 
many skirmishes and scouting expeditions, 

innately he was never wounded, though 
a bullet once passed through his cartridge 
box and clothing, grazing the flesh and 1. 
ing a swelling. I li- three years of enlistment 
having expired, he was h< tm >rably discharged 
in November, 1864, and returned hi. me. 

Mr. Hume was married in Brown coun- 
ty, Illinois, on the 27th of November, [864, 
to Miss Ann '/.. Stone, who was born, reared 
and educated in that county. Her parents. 
Myram and Eunice M. (Riggs) Stonewere 
natives of Vermont, and pioneers of Brown 
county, Illinois. Her mother was an own 
cousin of President Arthur. Mr. and Mrs. 
Hume have a fainib of nine children, name- 
ly: Elton, wife of A. McHugh, of Wapella; 
George A., a fanner of Wapella township; 
Charles M.. who is carrying on the home 
farm; Ida ( i.. wife of Alonzo Swisher, of 
Wapella: Jessie P., wife of Louis Williams, 
of Wapella; Sadie E., wife of Charles 
Swearingen, of Wapella township; and 
Ephraim C, Stacy A. and John Thomas, 
all at home. 

Mr. and Mrs. Hume began their domes- 
tic life « m the 1 >ld hi imestead, and ah. iut 187J 
removed to their present farm, which con- 
sists of eighty acres on section 35, Wapella 
township, adjoining the village. Here they 
have a nice home, surrounded by fruit and 
shade trees, and supplied with all modern 
improvements. Politically .Mr. Hume has 
been a life-long Republican, his first presi- 



dential ballot being cast for Abraham Lin- 
coln in 1804, and he has supported every 
nominee of the party since that time. He 
served one term as township clerk, and has 
been clerk of the school board, but has never 
cared for official honors. He is a member of 
Wapella Post, (i. A. R., in which he served 
1 ne term as commander, and is a man highly 
respected and esteemed by all who kno\\ him. 



<i. W. HYDE, M. 1). 

• i. W. Hyde, M. 1>.. possessing the 
typical, progressive spirit of the west, stands 
to-day a leading representative of the medi- 
cal fraternity of DeWitl county. He is 
now located in the city of Clinton, and 
throughout the surrounding country has an 
extensive practice, which his skill and ability 
justly merits. 

The Doctor was born in Derbyshire, 
England, April 11. [829, and is a son of 
William and Susan (Walker) Hyde, both 
of whom were natives of England. The fa- 
ther was a carpenter by trade and spent his 
entire life in his native land, where our sub- 
ject was reared to manhood. His educa- 
tion was obtained in the public and Episco- 
pal schools, he also studied and practiced 
medicine there. He then determined to es- 
tablish a home in the new world, coming to 
America in [857 and locating in Iroquois 
county, this state, where he practiced during 
the war. In 1873 he moved to Clinton, 
where, although there were several other 
physicians, he built up a lucrative practice, 
which extended through this and adjoining 
counties. Three years later be took a spe- 
cial course at the Eclectic Medical Institute 
of Cincinnati, Ohio, graduating in the same 
year. Owing to bis success in his pro- 




G. W. HYDE. 



Till KAI'HU AI. RF.O »RD. 






n, Dr. Hyde's practice Ik 
that he \ to confine himself t<> 

city \\<>rk almost entirelj some time 

- .in Main street, but In- 
built a commodious home, in which he lias 

•ice. at ith Ma 

street, where he has always kep( - 

sortment of n and tilled his own pre- 

Along the lines of his profession, the 
well read, a thorough student ami 
practitioner, keej»in^ fully a' 
with the times, and socially anil profes 
ally - high. There is none more 

flit after than he. regardless of his 
dining 5, and the many familii 

which he has been practicing cannot 

•lv other physician. 
•■ subject w:i~. married in England to 
.h Owen, who was born in Bir- 
mingham, and a daughter 
Six children have gladdened this home, 
four of whom are now living, namely: 
Mary Ann: Alfred W., who is practicing 
medicine in South Dakota: Walter i> follow - 
:ltural pursuits in South Dakota: 
and William F-, formerly a druggist, hut 
.1 farmer in Jefferson county. Illinois, 
ver rift i )r. Hyde has been a 

meml>er of the Baptist church, holding dif- 
and contributing freely to- 
port He is a member of Mi- 
Eclectic Society and the National 
Eclectical Society. In jm ditics he is a Re- 
publican, but has never aspired for public 
preferring to devote his whole time to 

-Mil. 

He eautiful home, surrounded by 

well-kept lawns, and very tastefully laid out 

with shade tree-, shrubbery and ferns, and 

r's own hands that have made 

tttractive. 1 1 ]>rac- 

_eoiis in the COUn- 



1 >c\\ itt. and ha^ won honor an 
teem through fas well chosen pi .one 

me will be handed down from 

- 



S \MIT.L MYI 



Among the highly n and infl 

intonia township, 1 teWitt 
county. Illinois : muel My< 
lxirn in Adams county. Pennsylvania 

1831 . and he is tl 1 I \n 

drew and 

whom were natives of Adams county. Penn- 
sylvania, and of German descent, who 
married in Adams county. Pennsylvania. 
The father was a hatter by trade and in 
or 1834 he went I ty, ( >hio, 

where he started a hat shop and conducted it 
for about m\ or eight years. After this he 
_cd in farming and continued farming 
the remainder of his life. To Andrew- 
Myers and wife w ere born eleven childn 
wh< mi live are in >w living, namely : Samuel ; 
Henry, who lives in Line •In. Xehraska. eti- 
in the stm.-k bus I. K.. died in 

California ami he is buried in Texas town- 
ship; Beckey married Hames Nelson, and 
they li\e in DeVVitt; Wiliam, who li. 
Xehraska and is a farmer and grocer, 
parents are now deceased. The father i> 
buried in wnship ami the mother is 

buried in Maroa, Macon county. 

The little education Samuel •■ 

him in a three months' course at a sub- 
scription school w 

ne dollar a month. He learned the 
hatter'^ trade in two his father's 

shop, and then althoug en he en- 

tered into an agreement for two sears at a 
salary of twenty-five dollai 



140 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



tii learn the shoemaker's trade. So well was 
Ik* pleased at the treatment he received thai 
when the two years expired, he remained 
with the same employer for four years more, 
and in 1S55 came to DeWitl county where 
lie herded rattle the first summer which he 
had brought with him from Ohio. In the 
fall of that year he opened a shop in the vil- 
lage Ml" DeWitt and worked at his trade for 
about eight years, then sold out and pur- 
chased a farm in (reek township "t" eighty 
acres in [863. This land had been broken 
and it had a small house mi it fourteen by 

sixteen feet and the farm was located in 
section 20. To this eighty acres he later 
added forty tin ire in the same section. lie 
also owns eighty acres in section 35, seventy 
acres in section S. he owning in all two hun- 
dred and seventy acres all well improved 
and w 1 n'ked hv his si nis at the present lime. 
After obtaining Ins first farm Mr. Myers be- 
gan farming and he continued to operate his 
land until July 1. [900, when he purchased 
three lots joining the city limits of Clinton 
and here built a comfortable house where he 
tii iw resides enjoying the good things 'it life 
his industry has secured. 

Mr. Myers was married June <■. t86l, 
at DeWitt to Miss Elizabeth 1'. Torbett, a 
native of Madison county, < Uiio, and she is 
a daughter of Peter and Elizabeth Torbett, 
and they were natives of Delaware. Thi 
parents had seven children, of whom Mrs. 
Myers was the youngest. 

Mr. and Myers have had eleven children. 
viz.: Jane, who married John Ferrell and 
they live in Iowa, and he was a soldier in an 
Ohio regiment, ami they have -ix children; 
Sherman is a carpenter by trade and lives in 
Kansas City and married Anna Robinson; 
Ida. win 1 married John Stone and they live 
in Iowa and have four children; Joseph 
Grant, who lives in Creek township and he 



married Dura Bird and they have two chil- 
dren: Lucy, win' married John Mcllvenna, 
and they live in (.'reek township and have 
three children : Emma, who married Harry 
Shields and they live in Macon county and 
have three children; William, who conducts 
a grocery store and is postmaster at Lane 
Station, (reek township, a sketch of win mi 

appears elsewhere in this volume; Charles 
married Mahle llaitsachs and they have one 
child, and they live in ('reek township; Myr- 
tle, a twin of Charles, lives with the father; 
May. who died June 9, [876; Lewis, who 
died AugUSl 27, [879. 

Mr. Myers is an enthusiastic member of 
the Order of Odd Fellows and takes an 
active part in all matters pertaining to that 
li idge. I le is a stanch Republican and sen i'd 
as assess ,v for two years of DeWitf town- 
ship, lie has also been road supervisor in 
I reek township and is school director of the 
same township. Mrs. Myers is a membei 
the United Brethren church. Both Mr. and 
Mrs. Myers are highly esteemed m the com- 
munity in which they reside and their pride 
in their stalwart sons and comely daughters, 
as well as interesting grandchildren, is wor- 
thy of notice ami no mote beautiful picture 
could he imagined than these two good peo- 
ple surrounded by the children they have 
reared by their own hard work and trained 
by good example to noble manhood and 
womanhood. 



EDWARD ALLYX. 



Man) of DeWitl county's adopted sons 
served faithfully during the war of the Re- 
hellion, and among this number is the gentle- 
man whose name intn iduces this review. He 
is one of Clinton's most esteemed citizens 
ami one of the oldest public school teachers 



Till- r.MNikAHllc'AI. RECORD. 



1. 1 1 



«>f DeWitt county, having taught thirty-two 
terms in twelve different schools. 

Edward Allyn first saw the light ><i day 
in I '. (rtage d »unty, < )hii >, w here he was tx >rn, 
December 17. 1837, son of Palatiah and An- 
geline (Joslin ) Allyn, both of whom wi 
old New England ancestry, His father was 
born at Barkhamsted, Connecticut, ami his 
mother is a native of Rutland, Vermont. 
When our subject's father was hut a child he 
was brought to ( )hio where he ami his father 
spent the remainder of their days as farmers. 

Palatiah Allyn learned the carpenter's 
trade and settled at Iliram. Ohio, where he 
took the contract for building Hiram 1 

and most of Ids work in this line was 
done at that place and Garrettsville. 

Edward Allyn began his intellectual 
training in the o mmon sch< « ils 1 if his native 
County, which was supplemented by a course 
in Hiram College, graduating from that in- 
stitution in [859. The same year he came ti 1 
DeWitt county, Illinois, where he secured a 
ion as teacher in the Excelsior school. 
Harp township. 1 )uring the following sum- 
mer he worked as a farm hand and in the fall 
1 in Wapella township. At thecli se of 
this term he took a special normal course for 
teaching at Normal, Illinois. Just at this 
time the country was thoroughly aroused and 
Mr. Allyn showed his loyalty and patriotism 
by enlisting in August, [861, in t )< tmpany A. 
Thirty-third Illinois Volunteer Infantry. He 
served four years and four months during 
the latter part of which he served as clerk. 
His regiment took part in many important 
engagements and our subject was always 
found where duty called him. 

< >n his return to 1 >eWitt county he again 
took up the profession of teaching in Clin- 
tonia township. Later he taught in DeWitt 
and Bametl townships and four terms in 
McLean county, Illinois. His thirty-second 



and last term was taught in Clintonia town- 
ship. 

In the early eighties he sen el three \ ears 
in Clinton and the same length of time in 

Bement as agent for the Pacific Express 
npany. 

It is as a teacher that Mr. \llyii is best 
known to the citizens ,.f hi- adopted county. 
Mis was the model school-room, ruled by 
kindness and not by rod. The old saying, 
"Spare the rod ami spoil the child," was not 
his motto.' lie was at all times gentle hut 
firm with his students and to-day he is held 

in the highest esteem by all those who know 
him best. 

1 lur subject received a part of his mental 
training under the able teaching of 1 
\.< .ariield long before that noble and grand 
man was called upon to serve as presidi 
this -real commonwealth, and it was under 
his pastorate that he was converted and bap- 
tized, becoming a member of the Christian 
church in 1857. 

(In March iS. 1N0-. he was united in 
marriage with Mrs, Adelia F. Thomas, 
widow of John I-'.. Thomas, who was a farm- 
er by occupation and a veteran of the Civil 
w ar, sen ing tw< > years as a member of < !om- 
pany F, Forty-first Illinois Volunteer Infan- 
try. He was discharged on account of sick- 
as a result of expi 'sure at Ft irt I ■ 
son and from the effects of which he died. 

June 6, 1864, aged twenty-three years. By 
his marriage one son. John !■".., was born. 
I le died aged 1 'lie \ ear. 

Mis. \llyn is a daughter "f Thomas S. 
Hutcherson, who was a native of 1 
cunty. Kentucky. He came to Illinois in 

11850, \vlicre he bought ami engaged ill 
farming, and to DeWitt county in 1 S 5 5 , and 
started the first hack line ever in the city. 
His wife. Susan 1 I leurv 1 Hutcherson. was; 
a direct descendant of Patrick I lenrv. 



i 4 2 THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



To our subject and his wife has been born brother, John G. Cackley, for a short time. 

one child, Nellie, born July 17. [872, who but soon went oul on the prairie and began 

died aged three years, six months, thirteen to work at Earming. He later went toPeters- 

days. Mrs. Allyn is a member and president burg, Illinois, and engaged in the butcher 

of the Woman's Relief Corps, and both Mr. business there for three years, returning to 

and Mrs. \il\n are devout members of the DeWitt county in [861. Here he engaged 

Christian church. for a couple of years in the butcher business 

During the past several years Mr. Allyn at Clinton, and then came into Texas town- 
has acted as correspondent to the city press ship and continued in the same line for a 
and local papers. He has also written many couple of years. In the meantime he had 
interesting articles on the early settlement of bought five acres of land on section 5, and 
litis county and at the present time is a rcpre- here he began to farm, adding as time went 
sentative of the Union Publishing Company on eighty-five acres more, and here he has 
of Chicago, publishers of scientific works. erected a substantial and comfortable house 

Twenty-eight years ago Mr. Allyn and other buildings and has successfullj pn 
bought lots and built a small house where his gaged in farming, fruit-growing and gar- 
present commodious home now stands. Mir- dening. 

rounded b) beautiful shade trees, making an Mr. Cackley has taken an interested part 
ideal place in which to spend their remaining in public affairs in the township and has 
days. He is a prominent and active member been one of the most efficient commissioners 
of the Grand Vrmj Post of Clinton, and its [ or t | R . past three years. In politics, he up- 
present commander, in which order he has holds the principles of the Democratic party, 
served in the various other offices. Pre- The marriage of Mr. Cackley was in 
eminently public-spirited, he has always Virginia, to Rebecca Lowry, who was born 
done all in his power to further the ad- in Virginia and died at the home place, about 
vancement along educational lines of De- twenty-nine years ago. She was the '\^ 
Witt county. voted mother of six children, as follows: 

Thomas W., who conducts a grocery busi 

+~~*~- riess 111 Clinton; Ella, who is the wife oi 

James Chamberlain, a farmer of Tunbridge 

JACOB 1 CA< KLEY. township; Richard, who is ,,, the saloon 

business in Macon City, Illinois; Charles, 

One of the early and highly respected who is in the saloon business in Clinton; 

citizens of DeWitt county, Illinois, who has Lulu, who married Samuel Middletown, a 

been a resilient of the state since 1X57. is merchant of Heyworth, Illinois; and an in- 

lacoh F. Cackley, who owns and operates fant, unnamed. 

ninety acres of rich farm land, located on When Mr. Cackle) first came to Texas 

section 5, Texas township. township, the land was nearly all covered 

The birth of Mr. Cackley occurred in with a growth of timber, hut he has wit- 
West Virginia, February 1 7. [827, and there nessed this all changed, and now nothing can 
he lived until he had reached man's estate, he seen hut the beautiful cultivated fields 
lie came to Illinois in 1S57 and located at which yield great crops of grain. Mr. Caek- 
Clinton, DeWitt county, living with his ley has done his share in this development 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



U J 



ami has l>een i>nc of the pi e men of 

this locality. Much is due 1 1 i ~~ energy and 
industry in making of this county what it 
is to-day, >. 'me of the richest land in this 
part of the grand old state of lllii 



JUDGE Rl (BERT WALKER. 

There arc in every community men of 

it force of character and exceptional 
ability, who by reason of their capacity for 
leadership become 1 >remost 

citizens, and bear a m<>st important part in 
the development and pr< . the locality 

with which they have been connected. Such 
a man was Judge Robert Walker. \vh< > 
l*>rn March 1. 1823, in Franklin county, 
Pennsylvania, and was son of John Walk- 
er, who was a native of the same county, his 
birth having occurred December 16, 17114. 
His lather. Samuel Walker, was na- 

tive of Pennsylvania. He was eighteen 
[ age when the famous battle of 

ndywine was fought and was a member 
of the Continental army at that time, but 
his regiment arrived too late to take part in 
that famous conflict He was a wealthy 
farmer and land owner ami in addition t< > 

eral hundred acres of land in Franklin 
county, Pennsylvania, he also entered fif- 
teen hundred acre- of government land in 
Hamilton county, Ohio. To him and his 
wifi orn a family of eight children, 

four ~on- and four daughters. In religious 
belief he was a Presbyterian. He lived to 
a ri|>e old a. 

As bef ted, John Walker, the 

ther of our subject, was I*.™ in Franklin 
county, Pennsylvania. Here he received 
the usual common-school education and 
learned the trade of a tanner, hut after oper- 



ating a tan yard of his own. he turned his 
attention to agricultural pursuits. In 1832 

moved to Ashland county, < 'hi", where 

'•■wed farm" 

id of which time he disposed of his in- 

ts in ( »hi.i ami joining th< n tide 

of emigration. He and his family jour: 

1>\ wagon to Sangamon county, Illinois. 

Here he purchased two hundred and thirty 

of land upon which he resided until he 
was sixty-three years of age. A few months 
later his wife passed away. Her maiden 
name was Miss Hliza Skinner, and, like her 
husband, was a native of Franklin county, 
Pennsylvania, where she was born June 22, 
1 — < j- .. Her father was of English d( 
and a Pennsylvanian by birth. For many 
he owned and conducted a tavern at 
Skinner'^ gap, on the road from Baltimore 
ti' Pittsburg. At one time he also owned a 
mill and died from injuries received in it at 
the age of sixty \ears. They reared a fam- 
ily of twelve children, all of whom grew to 

man ami womanh 1. The mother of these 

children passed to her final reward at the 

1 ninety years, being a resilient of 
Bradford county. Pennsylvania, at the time 
of her demise. The death of John Walker 
occurred in September, 1859. 

Judge Robert Walker was the third son 
of a family of eleven children, the others be- 
ing as follows; Samuel. Enoch, Stephen 
A.. John. James. Eliza, Mary and Isabel. 
He was ten years of age when he a< 
panied his parents on their ren Ash- 

land county, Ohio. Here he continued his 
education, walking two miles to the in 
school which was like all country - 

- in < >hio at that time. mad< 
His summer months were spent upon 1; 
ther's farm, where he remained until attain- 
ing his majority. That summer he worked 
by the month and the following winter 



144 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



taught school. The next year he worked 
his father's farm on shares and in a short 
time had accumulated a sufficient sum to en- 
able him t' i liny l'< irty acres of land in \\ i n id 
county. Here lie remained until the fall of 
[849, when he went t< 1 Macon county. Illi- 
nois, where he spent three months. He 
m-\t purchased seventy-four acres of land 
in Sangamon county. There he established 
his hi .me and resided thereon t""i" fifteen 
years. By industry, economy and frugality 
he added n> his original purchase until he 
owned two hundred and thirty five acres "f 
land, most of which was under a high slate 
of cultivation. In 1861 he purchased one 
hundred and sixty acres of land in DeWitt 
county, and in 1865 he took up his residence 
thereon, making it his home up to a few 
years before his death, when he moved to his 
beautiful home on section -. Harp town- 
ship. 

In 1845 he was united in marriage with 
IWiss Sarah Fretz, who like himself was a 
native of Pennsylvania, her birth having oc- 
curred in Bucks county, January 29, [826. 
She was a daughter of John and Kate 
( I lance 1 Fretz, both of whom were natives 
of the same slate. Later they removed to 
Ashland county. Ohio, where they lived to 
reach a ripe old assing the remaining 

\ears of their life in that county. 

Judge and Mrs. Walker became the par- 
ents of the following children : Lewis, who 
died at the age of eighteen; Enoch, a resi- 
dent of the state of Alabama, married Eu- 
genia Gasard, and they are the parents of 
three children. Fred, Ernest and Mabel; 
Katie, the wife of H. W cller. lives at Davis 
City. Iowa: Carrie married 1 '. K. Wilson, 
of whom a sketch appears elsewhere in this 
volume; Charles is also represented else- 
where in this volume; Jane resides 
with her mother; Anna became the 



wife of ( ieorge Throp and they re- 
side in Wapella, Illinois, being the parents 
of the following children: Dwight, Walk- 
er. Clara. Esther, ami George Howard; 
Lauretta married John Tackett and they are 
residents of Clintonia township. They are 
the parents of live children. Lstella, Lula. 
Dora, Raymond and John Robert. 

Judge Walker believed it was the duty 
of those who have the right of suffrage to 
study governmental affairs thai they may be 
able to v < ite intelligently, and 51 1 help n> make 
our nation what it should he. lie was a 
linn believer in. ami supporter of the prin- 
ciples of the Republican party and ever took 
an active part in politics since he cast his 
fir I ite for 1 lenrv ( lay. 

In 1870, Harp township took up the 
question of bonding the township for a rail- 
road. Judge Walker fought it heartily and 
ran oil the Anti-Bond ticket, hut was de- 
feated by three votes for to one against. Wv 
still opposed the bonding of the township 
and again in 1S71 he was made the Anti- 
Bond candidate against the same man who 
defeated him the previous year, and this 
time he made it a tie vote. ( )n casting lots 
he was declared the supervisoi Having 
always the welfare of Ids township at heart 
he served it faithfully to the best of his 
ability and time has proved that his judg- 
ment was excellent. In [873 Mr. Walker 
was elected to the office of county judge 
which place for four years he most credit- 
ably and acceptably tilled. He was a man 
of rare business qualifications, a great reader 
and an excellent conversationalist, lie and 
his wife were members of the Presbyterian 
church at Clinton. lie was an eider in the 
church for the last sixteen years of his life 
and also taught the Sunday-school in the 
rural districts. The congregation showed 
their confidence in him by choosing hint 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL REG >RD. 



'45 



as their delegate on several important 
asions. But his broad mind and great 
heart did not stop with his own church for 
he ever displayed a deep interest in the 
cause of Christianity. 

He died June 2, 1897, aj nty-four 

years, and i- buried in Woodlawn cemetery 
at Clinton. He is gone but not forgotten 
for his good deeds live after him. The 
name of Judge Walker is one which has 
long been identified with the history of De- 
Witt county and by his patriotism and wise 
counsel he earned the right to have his 
name enduringly inscribed on the pages of 
of its histi >rv. 

Mrs. Walker now lives in her pleasant 
house in Harp township and many of her 
children and grandchildren live within a 
few miles of Iter home. She has been a 
model wife and mother. She possesses good 
business qualities and is a lady of rare in- 
telligence and Christian virtues, a woman 
worthy t<> wear the name of that honored 
citixen and sincerely Christian man. Judge 
Robert Walker. 



I. II. BRYANT. 



Among the prominent farmers and old 
settlers of DeWitt county, Illinois, J. 15. Bry- 
ant is recognized as one of the most eminent. 
both I'll account of his long residence and 
also from the fact that his efficient service 
a- road commissioner has entitled him to the 
high tegard of his neighbors. 

The birth of Mr. Bryant occurred 
in Sangamon county. Illinois, on Fel>- 
ruary 20, 1831, this year being noted 

the one of the greatest severity 

experinced in that part of the 

state. He was a son of Reuben and Kg- 

nes (Simms) Bryant, the former of whom 



was born in Virginia, ami the latter was |„ ,ni 
in Kentucky. Reuben Bryant came to 

ir county, Illinois, married there and then 
mo sangamon county. His death 

curred in Menard county, after which his 
widow married William Mc.Murry. who 
one of the pioneer settlers of | >eY\ itt county. 
She was a daughter of James Simms. who 
was one of the first settlers of Sangamon 
county, and was the first man to erect and 

rate a grist mill in that part of the S | 
Usui- horse-power. A family of nine chil- 
dren was born i" Reuben Bryant and wife, 
eight of these children growing to maturity, 
and of these, J. B., who j. , „,- subject, and 
liis hrother. Thomas, deputy-sheriff, are the 
only residents of DeWitt count v. 

J. 1'.. Bryant had hut limited educational 
advantages, and was obliged to be contented 
with a few weeks of schooling during the 
winter months, as at that time this populous 
and flourishing part of the county was hut a 
pioneer settlement. At the age of twenty- 
one he rented laud in Sangamon county and 
began t" engage in farming for himself, put- 
ting int.. practice the principles he had 
learned during his former years. 

Mr. Bryant was married on the 24th 
of April 1853, t" Miss Matilda Y. Duff, 
who was horn in Sangamon count v. about 
live miles west of Springfield. Her grand- 
father, who was Abraham Duff, settled on 
Spring (reek when there was hut one hi 1 
where the city ..f Springfield now star 
and the Indians were abundant. He was the 
first blacksmith in this part of the state, and 
as in those days all travel was necessarily by 
means of oxen or hows, he was a very us 
ful and busy man. I le alsi . engaged in farm- 
ing and reared a large family. His son, 
Combs Duff, was the father of Mis. Bryant, 
and he became a fanner of Sangamon coun- 
ty and resided there many years, then moved 



146 



II I !•: BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



into DeWitt n unitw later moving to Macon 
comity, where he died at the age of sixty-six 
years, lie and his wife reared a family of 
ten children, and of these, Mrs. Bryant and 
her two ho 'ther-, Benjamin and John, still 
survive. The latter reside in Creek town- 
ship. This was a loyal family during the 
Civil war. all of the live Si ns serving in the 
Tenth Illinois Cavalry and returning in safe- 
ty t< 1 iheir homes. 

After marriage, Mr. and Mrs. Bryant re- 
sided in Sangamon comity until [865, and 
then came to the present home in DeWitt 
county. This is pleasantly located on ■ 
tion -'5. Clintonia township, ami cnsists ,.| 
fifty-four acres of some "i the besl improved 
land in the county. Here Mr. Bryant has be 
Come identified with all of the leading inter- 
ests and for thirty consecutive years has been 
the efficient road commissioner and general 
overseer < »f n *ads, all 1 >f the excellent and se 

cure bridges having been erected under his 
supervision. The township has a reputa 
tn .ii For its excellent roads ami Mr. Bryant 
has received much praise from the residents 

for the g 1 judgment he has shown, ^i\ ing 

the farmers excellent highways w ithout caus 
ing unnecessary taxation. 

Mr. and Mrs. Bryant and family are well 
and favorably known through the county. 
Si\ children have been born to them ; two of 
these died in infancy, a son and a daughter, 
and the survivors an : Jacquess, who lives 
in Sacramento. California, married Mamie 
Williams, and they have one son— George; 
John E., who lives in Clintonia township, 
married Minnie Met/ and has two children — 
Clyde and Lyle; Charles F., who is engaged 
in the shoe and hoot business, married Cuby 
Phares, deceased, and has one daughter — 
Helen Louise: and Sophia, who married 
Philo S. T°ncs, lives in Clinton and has two 
children — Clinton and Rea. 



Mr. and Mrs. Bryant are consistent mem- 
bers of the Methodist church, having become 
such under the ministrations of the hoy evan- 
gelist, 1 larrisoii. In this church they are val- 
ued for their true Christian characters and 
most exemplary lives. In politics Mr. Bry- 
ant is a stanch Republican, hut cast his first 
vote for Filmore. 

The DeWitt County Agricultural Soci- 
ety, at its fair in [900, wishing to do honor 
to these most estimable residents, presented 
to Mr. and Mrs. Bryant a solid silver spoon 
in remembrance of their being the oldest 
couple of the county horn previous to the 
deep snow oi [831, this being a notable 
event in the history of the state. 



EDMUND W. FRUIT. 

The Fruit family were among the early 
settlers and pioneers of DeWitl county. On 
the paternal side they are of Welsh ances- 
try and on the maternal of Scotch-Irish. 
Two brothers bearing the name left Wales 
and emigrated to America prior to the old 
French and Indian war. and one of them 
was witii Braddock in his disastrous defeat. 

But before the battle the brothers were sep- 
arated and the one was never heard of after- 
wards. 

John Fruit, the survivor, who was the 
founder of the present family, after the war 
settled in the Carol inas. Ili- son. James 

Fruit, lefl I arolina and went to Kentucky 

in the early days of that territory, where he 
lived for many years, but later came to De- 
Witt county, in the fall of 1830, where he 
died that fall. Thomas Fruit, the father of 
Edmund W., was horn on October 5. [784 
In [802 he removed with his parents to 
Kentucky and settled in Christian countv. 




EDMUND W. FRUIT. 




MRS. E. W. FRUIT. 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



>5' 



where lie remained until 1834, when he came 
to Illinois and settled in what is now known 
as DeWitt county, but which was then a 
part of Macon. 

The family landed here on November 15 
of that year. In 1827, in company with 
>'>me friends and land explorers, he came to 
the state and entered land, hut he did not lo- 
cate here permanently until 1834, when he 
ded on section 14. in what is now known 

lunbridge township. Here he remained 
until his death, which occurred on Decem- 
ber 15, [871. While a resident of Chris- 
tian county. Kentucky, he married Eliza- 
beth Thompson. July 31. 1 Sot ,. She died 
March 28, 1 866. By that marriage there 
were lx>rn six sons and six daughters. The 
mother of our suhject was a native of North 
Carolina and was sixteen years of 
when she went to Kentucky. She was the 
youngest child in her family, and when a 
mere child had the misfortune to lose her 
mother, who was drowned. 

Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Fruit took up 
their residence on a tract of six hun- 
dred acres of wild land and he at 
once commenced improving it ami erect- 
ing the necessary buildings and a 
log house for the shelter of the family. He 
and his wife did the necessary labor of those 
pioneer days and had the satisfaction of de- 
veloping a tine farm. The log house 
twenty by twenty feet and although the 
property was large, he fenced it and spared 
no pains to improve both his land and home. 
The name- of the children horn to Mr. and 
Mr-. Thoma- were a- follows: Susan \V., 
James S.. Thompson C, William L., Mary 
K.. Sabilla, Sidney (.'.. Edmund W.. Mar- 
tha J., Enoch A.. John 1).. Elizabeth 1'. 
The survivors of this large family are as 
follows: Martha J., who is the widow of 
John Henson, and -he resides in Clinton. 



Illinois, and has a number of children: John 
1).. who is a prominent fanner of Tunbrii 
town-hip. and Edmund W.. our subji 

Edmund W. Fruit was horn in Chris- 

tian county. Kentucky. September 21, iS 
and came to DeWitt county. Illinois, at the 

• n year- with his parent-. I I 
he was reared among the customary sur- 
roundings of pioneer life. Hi- early educa- 
tion was obtained in the log school hou 
of the day, chinked with mud and floored 
with split- puncheons full of -livers. At the 
of twenty he began life on his own ac- 
count and worked at whatever he could 
to do, hi- only posessions being the clothes 
he wore and one horse. 1 le traded the hi 
for a forty-acre tract, which is the nucl< 
of his present large landed e-tate and was 
the first piece of land he ever owned. His 
success was wonderful, as he now owns over 
twenty-five hundred acres of land, as fertile 
a- any in the -tate. 

After his marriage he and his wife be- 
gan housekeeping in the little log house that 
stood on the land on section 26, where In 
long resided. Mr. Fruit worked hard, and 
in time had money enough to buy more land 
and continued to add to his possessions until 
he i- now one of the wealthiest landholders 
in this vicinity. His e-tate i- well fenced 
and under a high -tate of cultivation. He 
has he-ides hi- farms in Tunbridge and 
Barnett townships, valuable interest- in Ken- 
ney. consisting of business blocks, dwelling 

On his farming land he has fourteen 
dwelling houses and rent- most of his farms 
at present. In 1891 he moved from the old 
homestead to his present location on the 
edge "f the town limit of Keuney. where he 
owns one hundred and seventy-one acres of 

ellent land in section 15. Tunbridge 

township, upon which he has erected a las 
modern house, supplied with all modern 



15: 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



conveniences, and here he resides, surround- 
ed by all the comforts of life. 

Mr. Fruit was married March 6, [845, 
to Elizabeth Boyd, he having returned to 
Kentucky t>> claim his bride. She was born 
and reared in Christian county, Kentucky. 
and died in DeWitt county, Illinois, August 
28, [852. Five children were born "I 
tins uni. .n. namely: Phoebe A. was Ik .111 
in Christian county, Kentucky, ami died 
in infancy in DeWitt county, Illinois. 
Sidney Jane married John Harnett, a prom 
inent farmer of Harnett township, and they 
have a large, family of children, namely: 

< >tlinc ; Mary, who is the w il'e of I >a\ id 
Hartley, of Harnett township; Kt'tie. who is 
the wife <>f Mosrs Boles, of Clintonia town- 
ship: Alberta R. ; Laura: Zoe; John; 
Charles; Frederick and Arthur. James V, 
who resides in Tunbridge township, married 
Sarah J. Stoutenborough, and thej reside 
on section _•<>, where he farms, and they 
have three children, namely: Garrett E., 
Harry and Rose. Mary married Frank 
Barnett, and thej reside on section 14, run- 
bridge township, and they have live children, 
namely: Frank, George, James. William, 
ami Flody C. William, who died in in- 
fancy. 

Mr. Fruit married again on November 
5, [857, Miss Sarah E. Blue, a native of 

West Virginia, and three children were horn 
to them, namely: Arthur W., who is a 
prominent farmer of Tunbridge township, 
married Ella J. Squires, and they have seven 
children, namely: Charles ('.. Clementine, 
Elizabeth, Elsie, Mabel, Nellie, Edmund. 
Laura B. is the wife of Benoni G. (lark, a 
fanner of Tunbridge township, and they 
have two children, namely: Mary E. and Ed- 
mund W. Charles T. died at the age of two 
years. The mother of these children died 
on April 28, 1873. All the children of our 



subject were horn in Tunbridge township, 
with the exception of the eldest, who was 
a native of Kentucky. The grandchildren 
were all horn in DeW'itt county, in Tun- 
bridge and Harnett townships. Mr. Fruit 
married again in 1 S 7 ^ . Susan E. Blue, who 
was horn in West Virginia, and died Jan- 
uary Hi. [880, without issue. lie then 
married a sister of his late wife. Miss lsa- 
bella Hlue. a mosl estimable lady, daughter 
of Garrett I. Hlue. who was a native of 
Hampshire county. West Virginia. Mr. 
Blue was there reared and died, having been 
a pn iminent farmer in his da) . 

Mr. Fruit has very decided opinions 
Upon all subjects and is a Democrat in pol- 
itics, hut was originally a Whig, casting his 
firsl vote for Henry Clay, and his first 
Democratic vote for George I'.. McClellan. 

lie is a man who finds his greatest en- 
joyment in the companionship ol his family 
and friends and he inspires admiration for 
his successful development of hi- land, as 
well as for his many excellent qualities. 
Among his neighbors ami friends he is 
recognized as a man oi rare foresight and 
open handed charity, and he enjoys a well 
deserved pi ipularity. 



Ji ill.X F. HUBBELL. 

This well known and prominent citizen 
of Wilson township, who has made farming 
his life work, was horn on the 17th of No 
vember, [833, in Lewis county. Kentucky, 
and is a son of Luther S. and Eliza ( Ferris) 
lluhhell. I lis father was horn in Ohio, of 
Scotch ancestry, while his mother was a na- 
tive of Kentucky and of Irish descent. They 
were married in Lewis county, of the latter 
state, and from there removed to Fayette 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RE< ORD. 






:nty. Indiana, and later t. i Cincinnati, 
Ohio, where the father conducted a cooper 
shop for a few years, employing several 
hands, he being a cooper by trade. Sul 

quently the family returned to Kentucky, and 
in 1852 came to Illinois, locating in whal 
now Wapella township, DeWitt county, on 

the JJil ■ >f March. There the father 1 
in farming on rented land, and later operated 
a rented tract in Wilson township, hut his 
last lays were -pent in the former township, 
where he died at the age of fifty-eight year-, 
his remains being interred in Sugar Gr 
cemetery at Long Point, lie became the 
owner of land in both Wapella and Wils 
town-hips. In politics he was first a Whig 
and later a Republican, and as one of the 
leading and influential citizens of hi- com- 
munity. he w as called up n U > rill the 1 (ffice of 
supervise ir of Wils. >n t> iwnship. 1 '•> th he and 
his wife were earnest ami consistent members 
of the Christian church, and he served as one 
> elders Mrs. Hul>l>ell survived her 
husband only alxmt eleven months, and was 

".-eight years of age at the time 
her death. 

This worthy couple were the parents 
nine children, namely : 1 Ie< >rge T., a resident 
of Oklahoma, married Judith Bird and hail 
ten children. Oscar, Owen, John. Minnie. 
Kate. Maude, Claude. Susan. Margaret, and 
one deceased. 1 _' > John F., our subject, is 
the second in order of birth. 1 3 1 Ephraim 
enlisted in Company E Twentieth lllii 

unteer Infantry, during the Civil war. 
and was killed in the battle of Shiloh. 1 4 ) 
Joseph ' Iscar, a resident of [owa, served in 
the same war as a member of Compan) 
Forty-first Illinois Volunteer Infantry. He 
tir-t married Catherine Vance, who died, 
leaving one child who is still living, t 'hai 
anil for his second wife he married Tillie 
Ellis, by whom he has three children. I larry. 



Paul and Guy. 151 Fran a member 

of the same company and regiment a- his 
brother, Joseph < ).. and i- now 
He married Olivia he-, who with her two 
children, Charles and Fanny, live- in De- 
catur, I Ilii 1 lame-, a resident of \\a- 

township, married Elizabeth Cunning- 
ham, and ha- seven children: Lilly. 
Fred, Cora, Nora, Abe and John. 171 Paris 
-V. a resident of [owa, married Minnie Mov- 
er and has one child. Jess • Mary is 
the wife, of John T. Brown, of Iowa, and 
they have live children, Charl. 

\lma and Allie. S trah mar- 

ried Philip Carr. and they died, leaving three 
children, two of whom are -till living, 
L. and Jennie. 
John F. HubbeH was educated in the 
ative state, and remained 
with his parents until he attained hi- major- 
ity, coming with them to Illinois. < m -tart- 
ing out in life for himself he v. fjed in 

CUttinj the tir-t winter, cutting fifty 

• >f four-foot wood, which he -old to the 
Illinois Central Railroad Company. In the 
following spring he and hi- oldest brother 
rented a farm near Heyworth, McLean coun- 
ty, which they operated one year, and then 
ged in farming together on rented land 
in Wilson town-hip, DeWitt county, for live 
yeai 

the r 3th of September, 1856, our sub- 
ject was united in marriage with Mi-- Eliza- 
beth Terhune, a daughter of Henry am 
rail 1 Brown 1 Terhune. who were nativi 
Kentucky and Pennsylvania, tively. 

She is the second in order of birth in their 
famil) of -i\ children, the other- beii 
follow-: 1 1 ) Ruth is the wife of Alva El- 

: [owa, and to them were born nine 
children: Millard. John. Alvin, William. 
Edward, Frank, Emma and Fannie, all liv- 

ind Ida. deceased. < ,\ > Mar} i- the 



154 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



wife of William Carr, of St. Louis, and they 
have six children: Walter, Louis, Harry, 
Charles, Belle and Etta. (4) Anna lives 
near Lane Station in Creek township, this 
county. (5) Daniel, deceased, was a mem- 
ber of Companj K. Ninth Minnesota Volun- 
teer Infantry, during the Civil war. lie 
married Melvina Thompson, who is still liv- 
ing in Minnesota, and they had two chil- 
dren, George and Louis. (6) Marine, who 
is now living in Kansas, was a member ol 
Company A, Second Minnesota Volunteer 
Infantry, lie married Mary Dunbar and has 
three children. Carter, Charles and Susan. 
Unto Mr. and Mrs. Hubbell were born the 
following children : (1) Francis Ephraim, 
a resident of Wilson township, this county, 
married Catherine Parlier, and they have one 
child. Elmer. (2) ( Ulie is the wife of Ed- 
ward I »e \tle\. of Wapella. 1 ;, 1 Alice is 
the wife of Edward Bell, of Wilson town- 
ship, and they have three children. Lyle, 
( arle and ( >pal. 1 | 1 Mary, and 1 5 I Will- 
iam, are bi >th at home. 

His home in Wilson township being 
burned in (862, Mr. Hubbell then removed 
ti 1 Wapella ti >w nship, where he rented a farm 
tMr aboul two years, and then purchased one 
hundred and si\tv acres of land "ii sections 
iS and jo. Wilson township, where he has 
since made his home. One-half of this tract 
had previously been broken, ami to its fur- 
ther improvement and cultivation he has 
since devoted his energies with most grati- 
fying result-, lie has built a nice residence 
and barn, has set out fruit and shade trees. 
and in other ways has d< ne much to enhance 
the value and attractive appearance of the 
place. At one time he was interested in the 
breeding- of short horn cattle and made but- 
ter quite extensively, hut his specialty now 
is Jersey stock. 

Since casting his first presidential vote 



for John (A Frftmotit, Mr. Hubbell has been 
an ardent supporter of the Republican party, 
and he has been honored with several local 
offices, serving as assessor thirteen years, 
school treasurer twenty-three years, and road 
commissioner three years. He ably dis- 
charged the duties of these various posi- 
tions, and is recognized as one of the most 
valuable and useful citizens of his commun- 
ity — oik- who i> always ready to give his in- 
fluence to any enterprise which he believes 
will prove of public benefit. He and his 
wife are members of the Christian church at 
Point, and it is safe to say that no cou- 
ple in Wilson tow nship are held in higher re- 
gard than Mr. ami Mrs. John F. I luhhell. 



WILLIAM WELD. 



In studying the lives and characters of 

our leading men. we are naturally led to in- 
quire into the secret of their success and the 
motives that have prompted their action. 
Success is a question of genius, as held hv 
many, hut is it no1 rather a matter of ex- 
perience and sound judgment?' When we 
trace the career of those who stand highest 
in public esteem we find in nearly every case 
they are those who have risen gradually, 
lighting their wax in the face of all opposi- 
tion. Self-reliance, conscientiousness, en- 
ergy and honesty are the traits of character 
that insure the highest emoluments and 
greatest success, and to these we may at- 
tribute the success that crowned the efforts 
of our subject. 

Mr. Weld was horn in Roxbufy, Massa- 
chusetts, February 4. i<S_m. and was a sun 
of Joseph M. and Lucy S. ( Richards 1 
Weld, natives .if Boston and Dedham, Mas- 
sachusetts, respectively. It was there the 




WILLIAM WELD. 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 






mother was reared and educated. She wa 
daughter of Jonathan Richards 'ier 

of the Revolutionary war. Our subject was 

ilie sixth in order of birth in a family ol ten 
children, the others being Joseph R., Hepsi- 
bah C, Daniel M.. Lucy 11.. Ann. Jonathan 
R.. Edwin, Elizabeth and Henry C. 

Mr. Weill received his education in the 
place of his nativity, and at the age of sev- 
enteen entered the employ of Thomas 
.Mo(.re. of Boston, to learn the art of litho- 
ul was there employed fifteen 
years, being foreman of his department ten 
irs of that time. < m severing his connec- 
tion with Mr. Morne he came to DeWitt 
county. Illinois, and purchased property in 
Texas township, ami later purchased an ad- 
ditional tract, where he successfully engaged 
in farming until three years prior to his 
death, when he removed to Clinton and 
bought what was known as the Hanger 
property, consisting of two and a half a< 
of land on Jackson avenue, with a house 
up. .n it. There he died March 12, (895, 
from a stroke of paralysis. He was taken 
ill Saturday morning ami passed away on 
Tuesday morning. 

On the uth of September, 1870, Mr. 
Weld was united in marriage with Mrs. 
Rachel E. (Giddings) Hickman. Her par- 
ents. Wilton M. and Sarah Ann I T'a\ 1 I lid- 
dings, were born, reared and married in 
Rutland. Vermont, and from there removed 
to Ohio, living for a time in Union county, 
and later in Champaign county. In 1850 
they came to DeWitt county and settled in 
the village of Clinton, which at that time 
contained only two houses that were two 
stories in height. They traveled with their 
daughter in a carriage, while their two 
-. .ns r..de in a wagon, it taking them two 
weeks to make the trip. They brought with 
them a few chairs and >. .me small articles for 



the house, hut most of their furniture was 
bought in Pekin, Illinois. Mr. Giddii 
purchased one hundred and sixty acres of 
prairie land in Clintonia township, which was 
then in a wild state, and also one hundred 
and twenty acres of timber land in Creek 
township. He placed his farm under culti- 
vation, set out orchards, built fences, barns 
and a house, which are still standing. Sub- 
sequently he sold that property and pur- 
chased forty acres of land just south of 
Clinton, which he owned at the time of his 
death, but' which has since been sold, lie 
was a carpenter by trade, and followed that 
occupation in connection with farming for 
many years. In politics he was first an old- 
line Whig and later a Republican, hut he 
would never accept office, lie died in Jan- 
uary. 1S7.V and his wife in the same month 
two years later, both being nearly sixty-tive 
years of age at the time of their deaths. 
'Their remains were interred in the Wood- 
lawn cemetery. 

Unto this worthy couple were horn three 
children, of whom Mrs. Weld is the second 
in order of birth. Edward, the oldest, was 
horn in Vermont, and is now deceased. 
1 le spent most of his life in Clinton, Illinois. 
with exception of the few years he lived in 
Florida and the time he was in the war of 
the Rebellion, as a member of Company I'.. 
One Hundred and Seventh Illinois Volun- 
teer Infantry. He enlisted as a private and 
for meritorious service was promoted to cap- 
tain of his company. He married Elizabeth 
Slater. ..f 1'ana. who still resides in this 
State. His remains were interred in the 
Woodlawn cemetery of Clinton. Milton 
Giddings, Mrs. Weld's younger brother, was 
horn in < ttlio, and served as a private in the 
company of which his brother was captain, 
and was with Sherman on his celebrated 
march to the sea. He married I'hidclia Col- 



i 5 8 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



well, who died, leaving two daughters, Min- 
nie ami Ada. who reside with him in Florida. 
Mrs. Weld was born and reared in < Ihio, 
and as previously stated, came with her par- 
ents to Clinton, Illinois, in [850. Three 
years later she gave her hand in marriage to 
John Hickman, a native of Kentucky, who 
came to this county some years prior to his 
marriage. B3 trade he was a blacksmith, 
hnt principally followed farming, owning 
and operating land in Clintonia township. 
lie was first a Whig and later a Republi- 
can in politics, and was a personal friend of 
Abraham Lincoln, lie died December 3, 
18511. and was buried in the Hickman fam- 
ily cemetery, lie left two children, John 
Milton and Sarah I... both of whom died 

at the age of sixteen years and were laid I" 

rest iii Woodlawn cemetery. Bj her second 
marriage Mrs. Weld became the mother of 
three children : Nellie, who died at the age 
■ >f fifteen months; Fannie, who lives with 
her mother: and Ella May, wife of \rthnr 
(, ["ennant, who is a clerk in the emploj of 
the Illinois Central Railroad at Clinton, lie 
was honi in Lancastershire, England, and is 
a son of Walter and Eliza 1 Bradburj 1 Ten- 
nant. llis father lived for some years in 
America, hnt died in England, and his 
mother, who is a native of Yorkshire, now 
makes her home in Chicago. They had nine 
children, of whom seven are still living. To 
Arthur <i. Tennant ami wife have been horn 
two children: William Weld and Fannie 
Evelyn. They have a line large residence 
on the corner of North Jackson avenue and 
West Johnson street, Clinton, which was 
ereeted by Mr. Tennant at a cost of thirty- 
five hundred dollars, and with them resides 
Mrs. Weld, who now rents her home in that 
city. She still owns the farm of one hundred 
and eighty-six acres of highly developed 
land in Texas township, left to her by Mr. 



Weld, which she rents. In addition to this 
she owns one hundred acres near Maroa, 
which is also rented. These farms are well- 
improved, there being good two-story resi- 
dences and new barns upon both. 

While a resident of Boston Mr. Weld 
east his first presidential vote for James Bu- 
chanan, the Democratic candidate, hnt later 
became a supporter of the Republican party. 
The citizens of Texas township called upon 
him to aet as road commissioner and school 
director, which offices he acceptably filled, 
and he alvvavs took an active interest ill 
those enterprises calculated to advance the 
welfare of his township ami county. In 
his home he was an indulgenl father, a kind 
and devoted husband, and his genuine worth 
and man} manl) virtues were widely recog- 
ni id. IK- never acted except from honest 
motives, and in all his varied relations in 
business affairs and in social life, he main- 
tained a eh. 11, uirr .md standing that im- 
press all with his sincere and manly purpose 
to do by others as he would have others do 
by him. llis wife and family are all mem- 
bers of the First Presbyterian church of 
Clintt m. 



MRS MARY 



\\ EEDMAN. 



Mrs. Mary J. Weedman, widow of the 
Amos Weedman. is one of the hon- 
ored pioneers of DeWitt comity, and none 
of us citizens are better entitled to place in 
the annals of the county. Both she and her 
husband have been noted for their public 
spiril and for tin 1 genuine interest they have 
displayed in everything pertaining to the 
progress ami improvement of Farmer City 
and vicinity. 

Mis. Weedman is a daughter of James 
Washington McCord, who was one of the 



Til! GRAPHICAL RECORD. 






first settlers of the county, ha * ted 
here in 1834. He was horn in Overton 
county, Tennessee, January 25, 181 1, and 
was 1 James McCord, of whom men- 

tion is made in the sketch of C. VV. McCord 

another pag this lume. In early 

manhood James VV. McCord married M 
Julia Wheeler, a native of Virginia, ami a 
daughter of Elijah Wheeler. She died in 
1854, at th< g •' forty-one The 

children lx>rn of this union were Elijah; 
Mary J.; Sarah: James T. ; Charlotte; Har- 
riet: Martlia: Hannah: William A.; and 
Rebecca and Julia, twins, who died young. 
Besides their own family the parents reai 
two orphan children. For his second wife 
Mr. McCord married Polly Herold, by 
wlmm he had four children. John, Amanda, 
C«>ra and I. aura. 

In 1830 Mr. McCord came to DeWitt 
mty, Illinois, hut after looking over the 
prairies he returned to Tennessee, and did 
not locate here until March 17. [834, when 
he entered forty acres of land, this 
the southeast quarter of the southwest quar- 
ter of section 2 3 ta Anna township. 
This was the third entry of land made in the 
township. When he came to this county a 

nd time he was accompanied by his fam- 
ily, and brought the few household effi 
which could he conveyed from his old home 
by team and wagon. Upon his land he built 
a log cabin :n. and then turned 

his attention to the improvement and culti- 
vation of his land. He subsequently en- 
tered another tract of forty acres, and still 
later a one-hundred-acre tract, and erected 
a more convenient and commodious 
house, around whose large fireplace his fam- 
ily spent many a delightful hour. Mr. Mc- 

1 made many improvements upon his 
farm, which is now one of the best in the 
county and is owned by Henrv Reiser. Ik 



and his wife were among the six who con- 
stituted the first Methodist society in this 

locality and were earnest, consistent 
tian people, highly respected and esteemed 
by all who knew them. They assisted in 
building the first house of worship in Santa 
Anna township, and always t'-'k an act 
part in all church work. In 1S50, during 
the gold excitement in California, Mr. Me- 
ed the plains and spent fifteen 
months on the Pacific slope, but he often re- 
marked that during that time he saw noth- 
ing so grand and s, , promising as the praii 
of Illinois. ( in his return home he resumed 
farming and carried it on ully 

that he accumulated a comfortable property 
which enabled him to spend his declin 
years in ease and quiet. He died at his 
home in DeWitt. November 21, [895, and 
and was laid to rest in Fullerton cemetery. 
Fraternally he was a member of the Masonic 
ler, and always lived up to its teaching 
Mrs. VVeedman was horn in Jackson 
county. Tennessee, May 25, [830, and grew 
t' 1 wi >manhood in this o iunty. On Decem- 
ber [6, 1S47. she gave her hand in marfi. 

\mos Weedman. who was l>oru in Perry 
county. Ohio, May 12, 1826, and in i v 
came to Illinois with his parents, John and 
Rachel 1 Wilson t Weedman. The family 
first located near Heyworth, McLean coun- 
ty, hut in [836 removed to Santa Anna 
township, DeWitt county, where Mr. We 
man spent his early life. Here he made 
his first purchase of land in [850, hut sold 
the property three years later and bought 
land in I'iatt county, where his son, Smith 
Y.. now resides. Later he purch; nil 

on section 32, Santa Anna township. ! 
Witt county, where he illy en- 

eneral farming and stock-raising 
until elected sheriff of the county in 1876, 
on the Republican ticket. So acceptably did 



i6o 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



he fill that office that he was i\\ ice re-elected, 
and after serving three consecutive terms re- 
fused a renomination. While in office he 
was called upon l" execute the first man 
hanged in this county — Patsy Divine, who 
murdered Aaron Goodfellow — this proved 
a memorable occasion to Mr. Weedman as it 
occurred on his fifty-sixth birthday. Being 
a man of strong nerves, cool and deliberate, 
he never shirked the arduous duties of his 
ce and he proved one of the besl sheriffs 
DeWitt county has ever had. After his n 
tirement from office he located in Farmer 
City, in 1882, and there made hi- home 
throughout the remainder of his life. lie 
became prominently identified with munic- 
ipal affairs, and served a- alderman of the 
city for a time, hut his attention was mostly 
devoted to his real estate interests. lie 
owned one of the best improved and most 
valuable farms in Santa \nna township. 
Socially he was a member of the blue lodge, 
No. 7 in. F. & \. M.. in which he served .is 

master: and also belonged t" the chapter, 
No. 60, R. A. M. : while both he and his 
wife were members of the Eastern Star 
Chapter and <>f the Methodist Episcopal 

church. In all of the relations of life he 
was found true to every trust reposed in 
him whether public or private, and he com- 
manded the respect and confidence of the- 
entire community. 

In the family of Mr. and Mrs. Weed- 
man were two s, ,,i„, namel) : (i) William 
Rucker, a resident of farmer City, where he 
lives a retired life, married Kate Page, and 
they have three children, h'.sk. Wallace and 
Laura M. I _' ) Smith Y.. a farmer of Piatt 
county. Illinois, married Lottie Thorite and 
they have six children: Harriet, who is now 
the wife of ( ',. Burford, and has one child. 
Freeman Y. : Amos: Otto; Jessie: Judson 
S. ; and Ward. 



REMUS HANTS. 

In a little log cabin on the east hank of 
llanlcy's Creek, Davis county, Kentucky, 
Remus Davis was horn. November 7, [819. 
I lis childhood days were passed in assisting 
in the duties around his father's farm, and 
in attending the early subscription schools 
whenever the home work would permit of 
his absence. I lis father. Phillip, was horn 
in Maryland, and his mother, Margaret 
1 Reed 1 Davis, daughter of Thomas Reed, 

was a native of West Virginia. Phillip Da- 
vis was a farmer during the greater part of 
his life, and in [836 emigrated to the west, 
settling in what is now DeWitt. hut what 
was then Macon county. Illinois, where he 
entered claim for eighty acres of land, thirty 
acres of which was prairie. In this wilder- 
ness the parents started to make themselves 
a home, erecting a little log cabin in which 
the) entered upon their housekeeping, hut 
their plans were alas doomed to unexpected 
change, for the following fall the mother 
was taken from her family by death. Five 
vears later the father also died. There were 
in the family thirteen children, of whom 
eleven grew to he men and women. Remits 
being at the present time the only one liv- 
ing, lie was seventeen years of age when 
the family came to Illinois, and therefore a 
large share of the work in the new and un- 
cultivated region fell to his share, and among 
other things he hewed the logs for the build- 
ing of the cabin. Though eighty-two years 
of age, he recalls all of the changes through 
which he has passed, and his memories and 
active life entitle him to a place among the 
very early pioneers of the state. 

In 1X4(1 Mr. Davis enlisted in Company 
E, fourth Illinois Yolunteer Infantry, and 
served through the Mexican war under Gen- 
erals Winfield Scott, Shields, Patterson and 




REMUS DAVIS. 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



163 



Polk, and was at the batl rdo 

and Vera Cruz. He enjoys the distinction 
of being the only living veteran of the Mex- 
ican war in DeWitt county. After the war 
lie came hack t<> his home and bought land 
which he improved, and later bought 

saw -mill in this section, which he con- 
tinued to run on and off for forty years. In 

50 he married Elizabeth Jones, of Indi- 
ana, and of this union there has been eig 
children, although only one survives, Mary 
the wife of Lew Mr. 

Foster - >f Andrew Foster, who came 

t" Illinois at an early date. s.'ine time in the 
thirties. Andrew Foster was born about 
1818, and was a farmer and millwright by 
trade, and ran a saw and grist-mill for many 
in 1883, hut his wife sur- 
vive^ him. and is living with her son. James. 
1 lint"ii. Illinois. The union- of Lewis 

-:er and Mary Belle Davis occurred 
Aug 884, and of this union there 

are seven children : Mable, Edna. Edith. 

tile, Homer, William J., and Lulu. 

Mr. Davis is now the i" - f sixty- 

six acres of finely improved land, having 

I the land that he originally purch; 

the prairies. He is a Republican in poli- 
tics, and cast his first v< >te f< >r William Henry 
Harrison. He is a member of the Christian 
church, as was also his wife and helpmate, 
wh September 5, 1892, at the g 

sixty years. 

4 ■ » 

WILLIAM ARMSTRl >NG. 

England has furnished to the United 
nany bright, enterprising y< iung men, 
who have left the L'.ritidi empire to enter the 
business circles of this country with its n 
pr< g methods, livelier competition and 

advancement more rapidly secured. Among 



this number is William Armstrong. He in- 
herited somewhat of the Si 
persevering and plodding characteristics de- 
veloped by his early environment, which, 
coupled by the livelier impulses of his Celtic 
blood, made him at an early day seek wider 

Is in which to give full scope t" hi- am- 
bition and industry — his dominate qualiti 
He found the opportunity he sought in the 
freedom ami appreciation in the growing 

stern portion of the country. Though 
bom across the broad Atlantic, he is a thor- 

Ji American in thought and feeling, ami 
his patriotism and love for the -tar- and 
stripes is fully demonstrated by his valiant 
service during the war .if the Rebellion. His 
career i- identified with the growth and de- 
velopment of DeWitt county, where he has 
not "illy acquired fortune hut where he i- one 
of the most highly respected citizi 

;ir subject is a native of Eng- 
land, horn in Cumberland count}-, July 
1831, and of Joseph and Anna 

(Hetherington) Armstr The former 

was born at Barnetl nd, and 

the latter was a nan imberland coun- 

ty. She became the mother of five children : 
Joseph, lane. William, deceased, 
and William, our subject. The mother 
these children died when in the prime 
life, and for his second wife the father of our 
subject married Jane Shinimean. and a- :i 
result of this union the following children 
were horn: John. Elizabeth. Thomas and 
James. After the death of his second wife 
he married Mary Ann Malson. Both are 
no'/ ed. 

The first of the Armstrong famil 
come to this country was a brother of our 
subject, George, who in 1S5 _■ located in ! 
Witt county. He was followed by Joseph 
in 1854, and William, whose name intro- 
duce- this review, located here in 1856. 



164 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



Prior to the emigration of William 
Armstrong to this county he bad received 
a very good education in Ids native country, 
after the completion of which he worked as 
a farm hand and also as a hrakeman on the 
New Castle & Carlisle Railroad. The first 
two months after his arrival in this country 
lie w.Tked as a farm hand, and in [858 he 
began farming on shares in Clintonia town- 
ship. Later lie moved to Larnctt township, 
where he was farming on rented land at the 
breaking out of the Civil war. Like so 
many of our foreign born citizens, he mani- 
fested his patriotism 1>\ enlisting, on Aug- 
ust 1. [862, in Company l». One Hundred 
d Seventh Volunteer Infantry, hut later 
he was transferred to Battery K. under the 
command of John 11. Calvin, of Chicaj 
lie participated in several important en- 
gagements, and at the battle of Lean Sta- 
tion. December [4, [863, he was seriously 
injured in the hip and incapacitated 
further active service, and at Know ille. 
Tennessee, oh June [9, [865, he was mus- 
tered out of the service of tin- United States 
and paid off at Springfield, Mini 
During his term of enlistment his de- 
votion to his country was fully tested, 
lie was a gallant soldier, and on the field 
of action was always found ready and will- 
ing to do his duty. He is now a member 
of the Grand Army Post of Clinton, in 
which he has served as chaplain and is now 
senii >r vice-c immander. 

On November 14. 1858, Mr. Armstrong 
was united in marriage with Miss Eliza 
Ann M. Sprague, who was horn in Ohio, a 
daughter of Charles L. and Mary (Wat- 
kins) Sprague. Her father was a native 
of Vermont, and soon after his marriage 
removed to Ohio and later to DeW'itt coun- 
ty, where he purchased a farm, which he 
improved and placed tinder a high state of 



cultivation, and where lie died in 1K77. Jn 
addition to this he owned two other fine 
farms. The old homestead is now owned 
and occupied by his son. His first wife de- 
parted this life in March, [866, at the age 
of fifty-two years. For his second wife 
Mr. Sprague married Julia A. Smith. By 
tlie first marriage he became the father of 
the following children: Frances; Eliza; 
Mary L. ; Samuel: Peter; Rebecca; Joseph; 
Margaret; John; James; Brazella; and 
Ruth. There were no children bj his sec- 
ond marriage. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Armstrong have hen 
born the following named children: 1 1 | 

rles J., who was horn September 2, 
[859, and died in [891. lie married Miss 

Molly Smith and she died October J |. n;00. 
They became the parents of three children: 
Freddie; Maudie;and Lillian. 1 _• » Georgei 
I'... horn May iS, [862, is a farmer and 
stock raiser of DeWitt county. He married 
Miss Margaret Roben, and to them have 
been horn eight children: Walter: Rena ; 
Sylvia; Eliza; Goldie; Deverj ; Robert; and 
Ruby S. (3) William 11.. horn May jo, 
[866, 1- 1 lie of the young and prominent 
farmers and stock-raisers of DeWitt coun- 
ty. Miss Edith Baker became his wife. As 
a result of this union the following children 
have been horn: William; Harry; Joseph; 
Grace; Hiram; and Blanche. Two others 
died in infancy. (41 Edward J., horn 
June [5, [868, is also engaged in farm- 
ing and stock-raising in this county. 
He married Emma Mathews and they have 
three children: William; Wesley: and 
Georgie. 15) John T.. born May 14, 
[870, married Miss Leoria Alwood. 
They have four children: May: Louise: 
Floy; and Marie. He is a farmer by oc- 
cupation. io| Jacob M.. horn August _m, 
1872, died March 7, 1874. (7) Ro]>ert S., 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 






born October _*. 1S74. married Miss R 
Bailey, and they have two children, Chai 
and Leland. He 1- als »ed in agri- 

cultural pursuits in this county. (8) War- 
ren Wesley, born October 8, 1876, en- 

'1 in the Spanish-American war May 
4. 1898. Soon after going into camp at 
Lexington, Kentucky, he was taken ill with 
fever and discharged, Aug 

n after his recovery he re-enlisted. Jan- 
uary 5. 1899, and was sent to Manila from 
California. He crossed the Suez canal, 
and. in all. has traveled about fourteen 
thousand miles. During this time he has 
participated in several important engag 
ments. and is now quartermaster's mounted 
orderly with the Fourth L'nited S 
Regulars, Company 1! Moses I... 

born March 25, [878, died September 25, 
1879. M01 Mary A., born February ; 

■ >. died in infancy. ( 1 1 ) Alice F... born 
April 3. [881, graduated from the Clint, in 
high school in the class of 1901. 

After the return of William Armstr 
from the war he purchased a tract of land 
in Barnett township, and with the character- 
istic energy that has marked his pathway 
through life he at mice began the cultivation 
"f the same. He alsO entered into the busi- 
ness of raising horses, cattle and hogs for 
market, and in this as well as in his farm- 
ing operations he has prospered. With the 
help of his father-in-law he erected large 
and substantial buildings, and as his means 
allowed he supplied his farm with all the 
conveniences ami accessories necessary !" 
carry on the business, and in his under- 
takings he has steadily prospered, meeting 
with nmre than ordinary suca hat 

he was able to lay aside the more active 
duties of life and remove to the city of 
Clinton, where lie now resides. 

Since earlv manhood William Arm- 



has been an active member and an 
earnest worker in the Methodist Episcopal 
church. For many years he has been a 
class-leader and trustee, and in 1*S<> he was 
sent as a delegate to the World's Sunday - 
ool Convention, which was held in Lon- 
don. England, and in [890 was a d 

the International Sunday-school Con- 
vention, which convened at Pittsburg, 
Pennsylvania. He was 

the mention which was held at 

Jacksonville, this state, in i v 

Such, in brief outline, is the histOT 
William Armstrong, who when a young 
man came to this country with a British 
shilling and full of determination to make 
his life a success. Hi< fondest dreams 
have been realized, and to-day he is enabled 
t. . lay aside all busines and spend 

his last years in ease and quiet. It is a just 
reward for a busy life, and when he is 
finally called to his final rest he will not only 
be sadly missed by his own immediate fam- 
ily but by all with whom he has come in 

cntact. 

— *—* — - * 

J< IHN M.JONES. 

John M. Jones, the well-known and effi- 
cient postmaster of Midland City, Illinois, 
was born in Decatur county. Indiana. <>n the 
17th of February. 1836, and 
James S. and Nancy 1 Bay) Jones, both na- 
tives of Kentucky. His paternal grandfa- 
ther. Benjamin Jones, was a native of North 
Carolina, but from early manhood made his 
home in Kentucky. There James S. Jones 
was born in [807, and on leaving home when 
a young man went to Decatur county. Indi- 
ana, where he followed farming me 
years. He was married in that county and 
there five of his children were born. In 1851 



1 66 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



lie came to DeWitt county, [llinois, and 
opened up a farm of one hundred acres ad- 
joining the present village of Midland City, 
en which he spent the remainder of his life. 
J lis death occurred in i S 7 5 . and his wife, 
who survived him for several years, died in 
1883. 

rhe subject of this sketch was a lad of 
fifteen years when he came with the family 
to this comity, and he aided his father in the 
work of the farm until after the Civil war 
broke out. On the 9th of August, 1862, he 
enlisted in Company B, One Hundred and 
Seventh Illinois Volunteer Infantry, which 
was assigned to the Twenty-third Corps, 
Arm\ of the Ohio, lie was firsl under lire 
at Elizabethtown, Kentucky, and was then 
in the Burnside expedition in East Tennes- 
see. I le took part in the battle at II; 
Ferry on the Tennessee river; the enga 
incut a1 ( ampbell Statii m ami the sieg< 
Knoxville. Later his command went on a 
foraging expedition through Tennessee, and 
assisted in driving I .< mgstreel from the st; 
The following spring they joined Sherman's 
a1 Tunnel I [ill, ami took part in all 
the engage I the Atlanta campaign, 

after which the regiment returned to Nash- 
ville. Mr. Jones was taken ill at Atlanta, 
and was in the hospital at Knoxville for a 
time, ami was then sent home <>n a sick fur- 
lough. < In rejoining his regimenl at \\ . 
ington, D. C, they went by boal to Smith 
ville. North Carolina, and took part in the 
battles at Wilmington and Fort Anderson on 
the Cape Fear river. They then j< ined < ien- 
eral Sherman at Goldsboro in time to take 
part m the battle at that place, and were then 
mustered out of service at Salisbury, North 
1 irolina, being honorably discharged at 
Springfield, Illinois, in July. [865. 

\fter the war Mr. Jones engaged in 
farming on the old homestead for a number 



of years, lie purchased the interests of the 
other heirs and succeeded to the place. I le 
finally sold a part of the farm and removed 
to Midland City, where he bought a resi- 
dence property, lie was married in Ver- 
milion county, Illinois, in [893, to Miss Sa- 
rah Chandler, who was horn in Kentucky, 
hut was reared in that county, where lier 
father, James Chandler, located with his 
family in [856. 

Tin- Republican party has always found 
111 Mr, Ji iks a stanch supporter of its prin- 
ciples since he cast his first presidential vote 
for Abraham Lincoln 111 [860. hour years 
later he again voted for the marts 1 president 
while home on a furlough. During Presi- 
dent MS administration he was ap- 
pointed postmaster of Midland City, and lie 
ing re-appointed under President McKinley, 
he is now serving his second term in that 
. luce, lie has heen three tunes elected JUS- 
1 the p< ace. and is also filling thai p 

Hon in a most creditable and satisfactory 
manner. Both he and his wife are members 
of the Midland City Cumberland Presbyter- 
ian church, ami he is elder and clerk of the 
session. Fraternally, he is an honored mem- 
ber of the Grand Army Post at Clinton, and 
is a man who commands the respect and 
confidence of all with whom he comes in 
either in s< icial 1 ir business hie. 



WILLIAM M. PHARES. 

William M. 1 'hares, one 'if the early 
and successful farmers of DeWitt county, 
Illinois, owns and occupies four hun- 
dred and sixteen acres of rich, highly 
improved land, on section 26, Te 
township. Although previously the owner 
oi divers other properties in the state, he 



THE r.K i<;RAP1IIC\L RECORD. 






came into ; n of th( I farm 

about seven yeai the hoi 

built large and substantial barns and c 
venient outhouses, and h:i< since been en- 

neral farming and si 
Nor does hi> home inti sent the 

extent of his participati »n in the affairs 
DeWitt county, for he is a representati 
Illinois farmer, in torch with eral 

happenings in the world, and keenly alive to 
all that pertains to the improvement of his 
township. He has therefore taken an acl 
part in the administration of the politi 

nch and 
uncompromising Republican has been su] 

iur different terms, h.u i g 
held the n during his thirteen ye 

residence in Macon county. Fraternally he 
iated with the Blue 1 dge of Ma- 
Maroa, Illinois, Maroa Chapter, R. 
A. M., and the Commandery at Clinton, and 
of the former li . ed for ten 

the worshipful master. He has also passed 
all of the chairs of the Independent Order 
of Odd Fellows, and has served as repre- 
tative of the Maroa lodge, to the grand 

A native of Greene county, Ohio, Mr. 
Phares was horn November i. 1828, and 
mained on the home farm until 1S47. when 
he came overland to Illinois with his par- 
ents. His father. Samuel C. Phares, was 
lH.rn in Hamilton county. Ohio, August 15. 
ged in farming until coming 
t" Illinois. He here settled at first near 
Waynesville, DeWitt county, where he 
rented land and where lie lived for about 
five years. After removing to Clinton he 
engaged in the butchering business for 
eral years, and then located in Texas town- 
ship, remaining with his -, ,u. William, for 
about eighteen years. He subsequently 



lived in Macon county for some md 

returned to Texas township, but event- 
ually settled with his daughter in Clinton, 
where his death occurred March 23, 19 
at the age of ninet] months 

and When he first came to Illi- 

nois he was a member of the Methodist 
church, hut afterwards changed to the 
Christian church. He Repub- 

1 and was justice of tin lin- 

t' m The • f Will- 

iam Phares, fonnerl) Sarah Marshal!, 
horn in Virginia, and cai Ihio when a 

small child. She was the mother of thirteen 
children, eleven of whom are living, and 
her death occurred October 17. 1877, at the 
home of her son. William, in Texas town- 
ship, her age being sixty-eight y< 

William M. Phi ruled the district 

completing his early 
education in the public scln 1 >e\\ itt 

county. Illinois. After leaving the home- 
id he purchased a piece of land in Clin- 
ton, which was later traded for a farm in 
Texas township, and that disposed of for 
hi- present farm. October 7. 1858, he mar- 
ried Elizabeth Nagely, a native of Madison 
inty, Ohio, and daughter of Aaron ami 
Eliza 1 Adams 1 Nagely, who resided in 
Ohio during the early part of their h 

I came to Illinois about [849, settling 
near Clinton. The father engaged in agri- 
culture in Ohio and Illinois, and is now liv- 
ing a retired life in Clinton, his wife having 
died about four years ago. To Mr. and 
Mrs. Phares have been horn tin > and 

two daughters, all of whom are living: 
Oscar M. lives on the home place and 
■si- his father in the management of the 
;e: Edgar t'.. who is an unusually pros- 
perous citi/en of Kansas City, Missouri, en- 
gaged in the lumber brokerage busii 



1 68 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



owning three lumber yards of his own, is 
married to -Mary Craig, of Mama. Illinois, 
and has two children, William and Kyle; 
William G., who married Arabella Wilt, a 
native of Pennsylvania, has two children, 
Lucile and Helen, and lives on the home 
place with his older brother; Eliza is 
the wife nf Clarence Sigler, of Decatur, Illi- 
nois, a traveling salesman, and has two chil- 
dren. Beth and 1'haies; Emma, the oldest 
child, is the w ife i if I h ward Ra) . >•'< 
Mama, Illinois. All >>i the Phares chil- 
dren were born in the county, and all re- 
ceived a substantial common-school educa- 
te m. 

While residing in Mama. Illinois, Mr. 
Phares formed a stock company and built 
the Mar. i.i Masonic Temple, at a COS) «'!' 
twentj two thousand dollars. To this work 
he gave his almost undivided attention For 
a period oi six months, and on its comple- 
tion had the satisfaction of knowing that 
they had erected one of the besl Masonic 
buildings in central Illinois. To the indi- 
vidual efforts of Mr. I 'hares the building 
was made possible, and it will ever stand as 
as a monument to his memory, as well as 
furnishing a home to the fraternity for 
many years to come. 

To such men as William M. Phares the 
present prosperous condition of DeWitt 
county is largely t\\w. The present and fu- 
ture generations can little realize what these 
men had to endure, what hardships were 
undergone, and under what disadvantages 
they obtained the necessary schooling "i the 
day. The educational and social advantages 
now enjoyed were made possible by men of 
this stamp, and those now living can never 
repay the deht of gratitude due to the 
pioneers of this fair state. Yet those pio- 
neers have erected to their memory some- 
thing that will endure for all time to come. 



The broad and fertile fields testify to what 
they have done, and untold generations will 
yet rise up and called them hlessed. 



WILLI \M M. SAMPSON. 

- gentleman has been a life-long resi 

dent of Waynesville, and for over a third of 
a century has been prominently identified 
with its business interests. Thoroughness 
and persistenc) have ever characterized his 
business career, and supplemented by care- 
ful attention to details and by honorable, 
straightforward effort, have gained him a 
most excellent and enviable reputation. 

Mr. Sampson was horn in Waynesville 
mi the 3d of November, 1S44. anil is a son 
of Junius M. Sampson, whose birth oc 
curred in Bath county, Kentucky, llis pa- 
ternal grandfather, Captain Francis Samp- 

. was a native of England and a sea cap- 
tain for some years, making his home in 
Baltimore, Maryland. At an early day he 
removed to Kentucky, and finally came to 
Illinois, spending the remainder ol his life 
in Menard county, lie was a will educated 
man and was highly esteemed by all who 
knew him. 

Junius M. Sampson was reared in his 
native state and accompanied his father mi 
his removal to Menard county. Illinois, 
where they opened up a farm. 1 le was mar- 
ried in Sangamon county, this state, to 
Miss Elizabeth Crumb, who was born in 

Maryland and came west with an aunt. For 
a few years after his marriage he followed 
farming in Sangamon county, and in 1 s 44 
came to DeWitt county, taking up his resi- 
dence in Waynesville. By trade he was a 
millwright and cabinetmaker, and on lm-at- 
ing here he purchased a mill, which he op- 



TIIK IIIOC.RAPHICAL RECORD. 






erated for some years. He filled the offices 
of justice of the peace and postmaster ;m<l 
w:i> a man of influence in the communities 
where he made his home at different times. 
He died in VVaynesville in 1871, and his 
wife passed away two or three years pre- 
viou 

As liis early school privileges were 
rather limited, William M. Sampson is prac- 
tically a self-educated man. In January, 
[864, when nineteen years ■ f age, he joined 
the !><>>> in blue of Company K. Twenty- 
sixth Illinois Volunteer Infantry, and was in 
active service throughout the remainder of 
the war. taking part in the Atlanta cam- 
paign and the march to the sea under Sher- 
man. He was also in the Carolina cam- 
paign under General John A. Logan, and 
wa- present at the surrender of General Jo- 
h E Johnston, after which his command 
mvrched to Washington, D. (.'.. and partici- 
pated in the grand review at that place. The 
war having ended he was honorably dis- 
charged at Springfield. Illinois, July 28, 
■ and returned home. 
Mr. Sampson began his business career 
a carpenter. For six years he served 
deputy postmaster of Waynesville under his 
father, ami was then made the first agent of 
the Terre Haute & Peoria Railroad at that 
place, in 1N74. He learned telegraphy and 
attended to the whole duties of the office 
for twenty-two years, when he was succeed- 
ed by his sun William, the present agent, 
his retirement from that position he 
ned a furniture store, which he still ear- 
on in connection with the undertaking 
business, and has built up a good trade. 
Besides his business property he owns a 
nice residence — one of the best in town. 
On the 4th of July. 1867, Mr. Samp- 
was married in Waynesville to Miss Re- 
becca Dunham, also a native of this county 



and a daughter "f Jeremiah Dunham. 

irly settlers. I Iks have a famil I 
six children: Carrie, now the wife of Thur- 
man I I McLean county, Illi- 

William, who i^ also married and is 
agent for the railroad company at Waynes- 
ville; Jennie, wife of Earl Buck, of \\ 
ville: and Gertie, Maud and Glenn, all at 
home. 

Since casting his first presidential 
for I 5. I inl in 1868, Mr. Sampson has 
been an ardent supporter of the Repuh 
part\'. and he has served as ;i member of the 
tow 11 hoard and as township clerk, i 
iously he and his wife are memliers of the 

•yterian church, and socially he 
member of Waynesville Lodge, I. O. ( >. I". 
in which he has filled all the chairs and is 
now • d. He is public spirited and 

thoroughly interested in whatever tends to 
promote the moral, social and material wel- 
fare of his native town, and has done much 
to advance its interests along various lines. 



lolIX TUGGLE. 



John Tuggle, a well-known and prosper- 
ous citizen of Harp township. lives in section 
16. He was born October 31, 1840, in 
Harp township, son of Charles ami Mary 
i Spencer ) Tu as a 

native of Kentucky, born in 1814, and the 
s. .11 of William Tuggle, who was bom and 
died in that state v hail. 
ucated in Kentucky and married there, lie 
came to DeWitl county. Harp township, in 
about 1835 and rented land for a number 
of years. His first purchase was one hun- 
dred and twenty acres of wild land, now a 
part of the farm owned by the subject of 
this sketch. He put all the land under cnlti- 



170 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



ration, creeled good buildings and made 
improvements. In this pleasant home, sur- 
rounded by family and friends, he spenl the 
resl of his life, dying April <>. [863. His 
wife died in 1888 and both are buried in 
this township. They were the parents of 
eleven children, seven of whom are now liv- 
ing, fames is a fanner and lives in Har- 
rison county. .Missouri: William. Solomon, 
Allen and ( re< >rge live in this t< wnship; their 
daughters, Elizabeth Sarah and Mary, and 
one 1 tries, are now dead ; I haiT itte 

is the wife of William O'Brien, and lives 
in North Dakota. Charles Tuggle wa 
believer in the principles of the Democratic 
party. By industry and thrift he became a 
well-to-do farmer and was a good citizen. 
a Tuggle was the third soil and fifth 
child in hi father's family. 1 le tt 
cated in the district of this township. 

At the age of twenty one he went to Clinton 
ami worked at th \flcr a shi >rt 

time he returned to th< and at the 

age of twenty five, on September 1 \. 1865, 
he married Miss Martha Price, a daughter 
of William and Louvisa (Wetldle) Price. 
Mr. and Mrs. Trice were both natives of 
Kentucky, had been married in that state and 
came to Texas township in [863. They 
rented land for a few years, then purchased 
a farm. To them were horn ten children, 
five of whom are now living. The deceased 
are Rachel. Elizabeth, Sophia, Edna ami 
Martha, who was the first wife of the sub- 
ject of this sketch. Isaiah lives in Missouri. 
Eliza is the wife of Myer Hansen and lives 
in Kansas. Leanna is now the wife of Mr. 
Tuggle Charli in Wilson township. 

John William resides in the -late of Wash- 
ington. .Mr. Trice was a strong supporter 
of the Democratic party. He died in [867 
at the age of fifty-five years. I lis wife now 
lives with Mr. Tuggle' s family. Though 



eighty-seven years old last March, she is a 
very active lady for one of that age. 

To Mr. Tuggle were horn seven chil- 
dren. Ills oldest son. William, married 
Myrtle Miller and lives in Harp township. 
Their children arc Tail, Ruby, Verna and 
Ethel. Charles married Retta Webb and 
they, with their three children. Clarence, 
Rufus and the baby, live in the same town- 
ship. James died in infancy. Melvin, Eliza, 
Fred C. and Aletha still live at home. Mr. 
gle's wife. Martha, died \pnl 23, [897, 
and is buried in Wilmore cemetery in Harp 
township. The next year he married Le 
anna I "rice, the sister of his first wife. 

John Tuggle has been a farmer since 
IS'.;' and a very successful one. lie now 
owns three hundred and sixty acres of well- 
improved land, which he uses for general 
farming, llis broad acres of waving grain 
are a standing monument to his industry and 
thrift. 1u politics he affiliates with the Tern- 

atic party, lie has held the offices oi 
assessor and collector, which proves that he 
has won tlu- esteem and confidence of the 
community in which he lives, llis wife is a 
member of the Christian church. 



CHARLES BRELSFI >RD. 

Among the leading citizens of Kenney, 
Illinois, is Charles Brelsford, the present 
mayor of the town. lie is a native. son of 
DeWitt county, being horn in Tunbridge 
township. December _■<). (859, to William 
and Lydia (Craig) Brelsford, who are rep- 
resented on another page of this review. 

Charles Brelsford, our subject, remained 
on the home farm until he reached maturity, 
receiving his education in the common 
schools of the township and assisting' his fa- 



TH1-: BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 






ther "ii the farm. In 1892 he moved u> the 
village "i Kenney and opened a real estate 
office, which business he continued i<>r some 
and then entered the insurance busi- 
ness, being the representative of all the 
prominent old line companies. In 190 

lected president of the village board on 

itizens ticket, and is 
of the leading representatives of his party in 
this locality. Fraternally he is a member 
of the order of Knights of Pythias, Kyle 
f Kenney. in which he has 
occupied all the chairs, being past chan< 
In bus lolitical and social circles Mr. 

sford stands high and well meril 
general esteem which he receives. 



TAMES M. KIRK. 



James M. Kirk, one of the leading and 
representative business men of Clinton, De- 
Witt county, Illinois, was born in Belle- 
fontaine, < >hio, July 26, 1854, and is : 

inge and Sarah 1 Robinson 1 Kirk, and 
a grandson of Samuel and Elizabeth ( Mar- 
shall ) Kirk. 

L. Kirk was a native of the 
Buckeye state and was born in Xenia, where, 
after receiving a common-school education, 
he learned the trade of brick masonry. There 
he remained until 1856, when he came to 
Clinton. S'H>n after hie arrival in this place 
he began the manufacture of brick, as the 
]>p .]ier clay for that purpose was found in 
the m •rth and east part < »f the ti -w n. He was 
tir^t associated with A. H. C. Barber, 
they established a large plant. At that time 
the town of Ginton had just been laid out, 
with si>me three hundred people living with- 
in its corporate limits. Being a new town 
the demand f< >r brick was large and in their 



enter]. n met with excel!. 

r Mr. Barber retired from the firm and 
I. \\ . Bell was taken into partnership. They 
manufactured brick for many of the m 
prominent buildings of the place, among 
which was the old Presbyterian church and a 
number of the present bi docks which 

inding in the central part of the 
city. In addition to his brick business he 

lit quite extensively in real 
and became one of the leading business men 

I Hnton. Socially h< member of 

DeWitt L dge, \'o. 84, A. F. & A. M.. 

member of the chapter and the 
oil. 

B) his marriage with t ah Rob- 

inson he became the father of two children: 

mel, who is a brick contractor 

and James M.. whose name in; 
duces this review. When but twenty -one 
years of ag( iber 4. 1855, Mrs. Kirk 

was called to her final 1 buried 

in the Bellefontaine cemetery. For his - 
ond wife Samuel Kirk was united in mar- 
riage with Miss Lucretia Morian, who sur- 
vives him. Mr. Kirk departed this life in 
[897, at the age of sixty-eight years, hon- 
ored and respected by all who knew him. 

The common schools afforded James M. 
Kirk his educational advantages, and up 
the time that he was twenty-one years of 
age he gave his father the benefit <<i his 
labors. October 3, [876, he was united in 
marriage with Miss Emma J., daughter of 
Eason and Alice Johnson. Her parents came 
to Clinton in 1858 and purchased a tract of 
farming land, which they still own and o|>- 
erate. He was a son of Joseph and Lydia 

•ok 1 Johnson, who were natives of Prov- 
idenc.-. Rhode Island, where his birth a 

urred August [3, 1 S 1 4 . Joseph Join 
emigrated to Ohio with his family and 
tied. Here he began farming and in his un- 



174 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



dertakings prospered, until at one time he 
had some five hundred acres of land under .1 
high state of cultivation. In the family were 
the following children : Ira C. Cylinda, Al- 
lnra. Joseph, Lydia and one that died in in- 
fancy. 

Eason Johnson, the father of Mrs. Kirk, 
was born and reared in Ohio, where he re- 
ceived a common-school education, the 
school being held in a log school house and 
in those early days greased paper was used 
for windows. He remained in Ohio until 
after his marriage, which was celebrated on 
December 17. [835, Miss Alice Calendar be- 
lling his wife. As a result of this union 
the following children were born: Mary, 
who is now deceased: Amos ; Huldah; Ira: 
Alice, deceased, who was the wife of John 
C. Kirkley; Joseph E. ; Allura, deceased; 
Lovina, also deceased, and Emma, who is 
the wife of the subject of this personal 
sketch, in [859 Mr. Johnson, accompanied 

by his family, went by water 1" Texas. 
where he intended to remain. Inn soon after 
his arrival lie became convinced that he 
would nol Ik- pleased with the country and 
determined !■■ return to the north. Alter 
a long and tiresome trip he arrived in De- 
Witt county in i860 and located <>n section 
3, Texas township, where he still resides. 

Although both Mr. and Mrs. Johnson are 
well along in years the) an and in 

excellent health. By economy and persever- 
ance they ha\e accumulated a comfortable 
competence and to-day are recognized as 
• Mie of the representative, families of Clin- 
ton county. 

I'm our subject ami his wife have been 
born the following children: Marshall 
died at the age of two months; James Rob- 
ert is associated with his father: Alice L. 
resides at home; Willoughby E. is a me- 



chanic; Fred K. and Reuben \\ . are stu- 
dents. 

\iter working some years as a journey- 
man the subject of this sketch began con- 
tracting mi his own account and fur the 
past twenty four years has been actively 
identified with the business and commercial 
interests of Clinton, and is new recognized 
as the leading contractor ami builder of De- 
Witt county. Among the mure prominent 
buildings that he has had under his per- 
sonal supervision is the Register block, the 
remodeling and enlarging the Renick opera 
house, Christian church, Lincoln school 
building, gas plant and many "thers tOO 1111- 
m< n 'Us ti ' mentii »n. 

Socially Mr. Kirk holds a prominent 
place. lie is a member and recorder of 
Clinton Commandery, No. 66, K. T., T. I. 
M. Clinton Council. No. 74, R. & S. M., 

P. II. P. I [brake < Chapter, No. 59, R. A. 

M.. I'. M. DeWitt Lodge, No. 84, A. F. & 
A. M.. and I'. \\ . I'. Myrtle Chapter. No. 
[31, O. I'.. S. Iii polities he has never taken 
more than the interest thai ever) puhlie spir- 
ited man should, hut at all times he stands 
ready and willing to do all in his power to 
further the interests of his adopted city, lie 
served one year — iNNi-iNNj — as city mar- 
shal of the city of Clinton, and two years 
in the city council from the first ward. 



\\ I'.SI.HY CLEARWATER!- 

This well-known resident of Farmer City 
was born on the 2nd of March. [854, in the 
suburbs of that city, on a place now owned 
by ( ). J. Smith. His parents were Nathan 
and Mary M. (Danner) Cleanvaters, of 
whom extended mention is made in the 



'in:: r.KKiUAPincAL record. 



>;- 



sketch of Reuben Clearwaters on another 
page "t this volume. At the age of twelve 
years our subject entered the office of J. S 
Harper, who was then publishing a weekly 
paper in Farmer City, ami with him served 
an apprenticeship t" the printer's trade. In 
[888 he established the Public Reaper, 

which he Sold two year- later to his brother 
Reuben, ami then removed t" Rose Hill. 
Iowa, where he edited the Rose llill Sun 
for nine months, lie next went t< > Craw- 
fordsville, Indiana, where he worked a- a 
journeyman printer until his removal t" 
Petersburg, that state. There he started the 
Tallula Express, which he conducted for five 
months, and on selling out returned to 
Farmer City, where the following year was 
parsed. 

Mr. Clearwaters was next engaged in 
the laundry business at Frankfort, Indiana, 
for a year, and at the end of that time - 
out and opened a steam laundry in Farmer 
City, in iS<)-i. it being the first in the place. 
After conducting it for four years he -old 
out. and has since worked with his brother 
Reuben at the carpenter's trade, though he 
is now practically living a retired life on 
account of ill health. In the spring and 
summer of 1901 he assisted in building the 
beautiful modern residence — the largest in 
Farmer City — now occupied by himself and 
family, together with < >. J. Smith, who has 
made his home with them for some time. 
and is considered one of the family. 

In 1875 Mr. Clearwaters married Miss 
llettie Blandin, a native of McLean county, 
Illinois, and a daughter of Thomas ami 

lise (Myers) Blandin. Six children 
blessed tin- union: Ola; Ora, deceased; 
John; one who died in infancy; Darrow I >. ; 
and Grace E. The parents are both mem- 
bers of the Methodist Episcopal church, and 
Mr. Clearwater- 1- a stanch supporter of 



the Democratic party ami it- principle- lie 
is widely and favorably known in tin 
ti"ii of the county, where the greater part of 
his life ha- been passed, and wherever he 
ha- gone he ha- made many friends. 



I \.\IKS CANTRA1 I 

This well known agriculturist, wl 
home i- on section 32, Waynesville town- 
ship, just south of the village of VVaym 
ville. was horn on dial farm. June [9, 1845, 
and i- a worthy representative of an honored 
pioneer familj of DeWitt county. The first 
of the family to come to America was his 
great-great-grandfather, Zebulon Cantrall, 
who was born in Wale- of Scotch ancestry, 
and crossed the Atlantic to the new world in 
17110. He located in Philadelphia, Pennsyl- 
vania, and built the first brick house in that 
city. In his family were two -, ms, Joseph 
and Joshua. The latter, who was the great- 
grandfather of our subject] fought for 
American independence in the Revolutionary 
war. lie wa- a native 1 if Virginia, and died 
there. Joshua, hi- grandfather, removed to 
Kentucky in [789. Later he went to Ohio, 
and from there came to Illinois in [835, ar- 
riving in what i- now DeWitt county on the 
7th of October. Here he successfully en- 
ged in farming and acquired eighteen hun- 
dred acre- of land, which at hi- death he left 
ti > hi- children. 

Joshua Cantrall, Jr.. our subject's fa- 
ther, was born in Clark county. Ohio, Sep- 
tember J'K 1818, and was seventeen year- of 
age on the removal of his familj to this 
county. Here he wedded Miss Mar\ Jane 

Robb, who was born near Nashville, Ten- 
nessee, and was a daughter of John Robb, 
one of the first settlers of DeWitt county. 



176 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



She died September 20, [855, leaving two 
children, who reached mature years, namely : 
lames, of this review ; and Mrs. Rachel C. 
In-hain. a residenl of Warrensburg, Macon 
county, Illinois. The father was again mar- 
ried and continued to reside on the "Id home- 
stead near Waynesville until 1X7*1. when he 
built in Waynesville and resided there until 
his death. March 31, [897. Throughoul 
life he followed I man) years 

he was the elders and a prominent 

and active member of the Presbyterian 
church of Waynesville, and ever took an 
active interest in Sunday-school work, serv- 
ing as superintendent for twi en con- 
secutive years, and thirty-three years in all. 
He declined longer to accept that office, hav- 
ing' by that time become quite "Id. though he 
continued a Sunday-school worker up to the 
time of his death. 

During his boyhood Jai irall at- 

tended the public and select schools of 
Waynesville, and aided his father in the 
work "i~ the farm until twenty-five year 

lie was then married in Decatur, llli- 
nois, t" .Miss Marx I. I.anham. and brought 
his bride t>> the old homestead, which lie 
carried on for his father during his declin- 
ing years. He new owns the farm, which 
consists of sixty-eight of rich and 

arable land, and in connection with its op- 
eration he has under cultivation over two 
hundred acres. He has always given con- 
siderable attention to breeding, raising and 
dealing in stuck, making a specialty ol line 
draft horses of the Englishshire breed. He 
iimw owns a share m Aulhra George, a pure- 
blooded stallion, which is one of the best in 
the county. 

Mr. Cantrall's first wife died March 30. 
1889, leaving two daughters. Nellie M. and 
Mabel C. On the --Nth of November, the 
same rear, he was again married in Decatur. 



his second union being with Mrs. Christine 
II. (Huckleberry) Stewart, who was born 
in Indiana, hut spent her early life in Illi- 
nois. Mr. Cantrall and his family all hold 
membership in the Waynesville Presbyterian 
church, and are people of prominence in the 
community where thev reside. His political 
support has always been given the men and 
measures of the Republican parte since he 

i his lirsi presidential vote for General 
I . S. ( Irani, in [8l 8, hut he has never cared 
office, his time being wholly taken up 
by his business affairs, lie is well known 
in the community where his entire life his 
been passed, and all his interests from boy- 
hood have been closely associated with that 

tlity. He has seen the wild land trans- 
formed into beautiful homes and farms, and 
in the worl mpro\ ement he has e\ er 

I 1 ii ue his part. 



ISAAC C. THURBER. 

No one in DeWitt county is more thor- 
oughly identified with the interests thereof 
than is Isaac C. Thurber, who. for the past 
sixteen years, has lived on and managed a 
farm of one hundred and sixty acres on 
tion tvventv two, Texas township. To quite 
a large extent he is engaged in stock-rais- 
ing, making a specialty of short horns, 
usually having about a hundred head, he- 
sides an average of thirty-five- head of 
horses and four hundred and fifty sheep. 
In addition to his other responsibility he has 
charge of the pasture land of the Moore es- 
tate of twelve hundred acres located on Salt 
Creek, the property running a mile and a 
half east and west, and one and a half miles 
north and south along Salt Creek, 
in Texas township. Although prac- 




ISAAC C. THURBER. 




MRS. I. C. THURBER. 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



181 



tically independent in politics, he usua 
votes the Democratic ticket, and has held 
many important offices within the gift of the 
township. For several years he has been 
constable and assessor, and has I icon school 
director nearly all of his residence in the 
county, ami still holds the position. Frater- 
nally he is connected with Clinton Lodge, 
No. 84, A. F. & A. M. 

Of smrdv Scotch-English ancestry, Mr. 
Thurber was born in Liverpool, England, 
May 21, [838, and came to the Unite : 
with his parents when les> than a year old. 
His father. Benjamin, and his mother, Per- 
Thurber, were horn respectively 
in .Scotland and England, and after coming 
to America the former worked at his trade 
< f carpenter and millwright, having been a 
ship carpenter in the old country. After 
living for a short time in Canada, the fam- 
ily located at Fort Wayne. Indiana, and here 
the father successfully followed his trade 
until his death at die . sixty years. 

J lis wife, who was the mother of nine 
children, six of whom are living, died when 
her son [saac was seven ye He 

remained, at home until about fifteen year- 
old, at which time he started out to face an 
independent future, working on farms in In- 
diana. With the outbreak of the Civil war 
lie enlisted in Compan) ( . One Hundred 
and Fifty-second Illinois Volunteer Infan- 
try, and was a corporal under Captain 
James M. Hunter, serving until the close of 
the war. After his honorable discharge 
September 11. 1865, at Memphis. Tennes- 

he returned to DeWitt county. Illinois, 
and for several years lived on rented farms, 
eventually settling upon the farm upon 
which he ha- lived for so many \i 

In January of 1868 Mr. Thurber married 
Charlotte Swisher, daughter of James and 
Ruth 1 Ma\ all ) Swisher, of whom the latter 



i- deceased, and the former resides in 
township with his son-in-law. To Mr. and 
Mr-. Thurber have been horn eight chil- 
dren, -even of whom are living: Mary 
Esther, who i-> the wife of James A. Lane, a 
farmer living near Weldon, DeWitt county, 
and has two children, Chelsea and Harold; 
Florence, who died when nineteen months 
old; Olive, who i- the wife of Ralph White- 
head., of Decatur, Illinois, and has three chil- 
dren, (.lady-. Robert and Matilda : k 
who married 1 .1 ie Bennett, daughter of 
John Bennett, of (reek township, and is liv- 

me place : Amy. Ruth. I 
and Zettie, w living at home. The 

and daughters were educated in the 
publii . and all were horn in Texas 

township. Mr. Thurber stands high in the 
community of which he is an honored mem- 
ber, and numbers his tried and tr 
friends bv th< 



CHARLES Ill'UD. 



Charles Hurd, a prosperous and substan- 
tial agriculturist of Wilson township, is 
typical self-made man. and in the follow 

rd of hi- career there is much to an 
respect ami esteem, lie has always made 
the most of his advat tnd by his indus- 

perseverance and good management has 
worked his way steadily upward and now 
stands among the successful few. 

A native of New Hampshire. Mr. Hurd 
1). .rn in Sullivan county. December 27, 
1830, and i- a son of Elisha and Florinda 
(Stevens) Hurd. The father was a native 
of the same county and a son of Peter and 
Merihah (Atwood) Hurd. the former of 
whom was a -"li of Nathan Hurd. The 
Hurd family came originally from England 



182 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



and was founded in Connecticut by four 
brothers soon after the landing of the Pil- 
grims who came to this country in the May- 
flower. The father of our subject, who was 
a farmer by occupation, died in New Hamp- 
shire in [874, Inn the mother is '-till living 
at the advanced age of ninet) one years and 
possesses her mental and physical faculties 
to a remarkable degree. She makes her 
In une with her youngest son, Bela, in New 
Hampshire, on the "Id homestead. Relig- 
iously she is a member of the Christian 
church, t" which her husband belonged, and 
in p. >hiies he was a Democrat. Their chil- 
dren were Jul. ma. wife of (enter 1.. CuttS, 
1 if Massachusetts; George \\ .. a resident 
Xew Hampshire; Bela, who lives on the 
old homestead in that state; and Charles, of 
this review. Three children died in child- 

h 1. while Mrs. Ellen Gardner died after 

reaching maturity, as did Lois, who died in 
young womanhood. 

t lur subject grew t" manhood among the 

hills of the old Granite State and attended 
the district scho, ,1s near his home and later 
the academies at Newport and Washington, 
Sullivan county, where he finished his edu- 
cation and tilted himself for teaching, to 
which profession he turned his attention at 
the age of twenty. For some tune he taught 
in the district schools during the winter 
months, while the summer season was de- 
voted to farming. 

On the 17th of March. 1S57. Mr. llurd 
married Miss Sarah F. Alden, a daughter 
of Thomas and Huldah (Blodgett) Alden. 
and granddaughter of Levi and Boadicia 
(Warner) Alden. Her paternal great- 
grandfather was Captain Thomas Warner, 
who served with distinction all through the 
Revolutionary war as an officer under Gen- 
eral Washington. Mrs. llurd's father was 
of the seventh veneration in direct descent 



from John Alden. who was immortalized by 
Longfellow's poem — The Courtship of Miles 

Standish. None of that generation are now 

living. Thomas Alden died in [892, at the 
age of eighty-five years, and his wife the 
same year, at the same age. II is children 
were Caroline, deceased; Sarah F., wife of 
1 >ur subject : < re< irge, w hi 1 died j 1 mng ; I telen 
I... deceased wife of George W. Ilurd, a 
brother of our subject; Anna C deceased 
wife of Milton I'. Bailey; and John, a resi- 
dent of \ew Hampshire. Of the four chil- 
dren born to Mr. and Mrs. llurd one died 
in infancy. Those living are as follows: 
( 1 t John Alden. a residenl "t Wilson town- 
ship, this county, married Isadora Mason 
and has two children. Carl (I. and Malvola. 
1 Flora S. is the wife of Melvin Johnson. 
• a' the same township, and they have one 
child, Raymond. (3) Charles E. married 
Annabel 1 1 end rick sou and liv is on the home 
farm 1 if 1 mr subject . 

Iii [863 Mr. llurd came west and first 
located in Menard county, Illinois, where he 
had two uncles living, and he taught school 
there until 1868. In the meantime he ac- 
quired some farm land in that county, which 
he s, ,1,1 in [868, and then removed to De 
Witt county, buying a one-hundred-acre 
tract of timberland on section 28, Harp 
township. Here he resumed teaching and 
continued to follow that pursuit for two 
years. Selling his property in 1S71. he re- 
moved to Wilson township and purchased 
one hundred and sixty acres of improved 
land "ii sections 28 and _'«). and also a ten- 
acre tract of timber land, which he suhse- 
quently cleared and sold, lie also taught 
school in Wilson township for two years. 
day he is the owner of a line farm, well 
fenced and tiled and under a high state of 
cultivation. Along the highway he has set 
out some lovely maple trees, which not only 



THi RAPHICAL RECORD. 






add to the beauty of his place, but which a 
cast a grateful shade over l 
eler. In [891 he built a ni> and 

erected a good barn in [8 . that he now 

has one of the best improved and most at- 
tractive places of the township. 

Religiously lx>th Mr. and Mrs. Hup 
members of the Uni church and 

litically he is identified with the Democratic 
party. His fellow citizens, reo his 

\\<>rth and ability, have called upon him to 
rill several local positions of honor and tr 

township supervisor two terms, 
and - r, township clerk and 

school director. His public service has been 
most exemplary, and his private life has been 
marked by the utmost fidelity to duty. Hi 
thoroughly identified with the intei 
hi> adopted county, and is well known as an 
enterprising and reliable business man. who 
is held in the big' em by all with 

wh< >m he is brought in contact. 



ORSOX T. SMITH. 



The world instinctively . pays deference 
to the man whose success has been worthily 
achieved — one who has overcome the ob- 
stacles in his path and through his own un- 
aided efforts has attained a position of afflu- 
ence. Mr. Smith, by the improvement of 
opportunities by which all are surrounded, 
teadily and honorably worked his way 
upward, and is to-day one of the wealthy 
citizen- of Farmer City. 

A native of Xew York, he was born in 
Caoandaigua, Ontario county. July 30, 1827, 
and is a s, , n . if Jao to and Submit ( Jan • 
Smith. His paternal grandfather was John 
Smith, who was born in Schoharie county. 
Xev. York, and died in the western part of 



that state at about I 

He was twice married and had children by 
Inith wives. Those of the first union w< 

b. Nelson, William. Ma 
Maria. Smith, the father of our sub- 

■ bom in Schoharie county, and 
I t.. ( Intario county, 
where he purchased the property owned by 
the Jameson heirs, and successfully 1 
in farming throughout life. He died at the 
ity-thrc. hi-s w Jf e ; ,t the 

nty-four. The} had a familj 
ten children, namely : Maria Jane. 
I.. Hugh J.. John. Charles. Frances J.. Ann, 
Helen. Mittie ( '. and Albert. 

The early education of our subject 
I in the common scl 
tive state, and he commenced teaching 
at the ;i ghteen years. ;i t fifty-: 

ir months and a half. With the 
money thus earned he paid his way at the 
my, and in me 

-'.. where he could receive a b< rv. 

He first taught in Sangamon county, Illi- 
nois, and devoted his attention to that ;• 

sion for over twenty years, hi 
being in Santa Anna township. DeWitt 
county, where he received sixty dollars per 
month. This was in [866. In 1857 ne 
removed to Blue Ridge, Piatt county. Illi- 
nois, where he made his homi ie time. 
During the time he v in 
teaching Mr. Smith invested his money in 
Illinois land, being fully convinced that it 
was the best in the world. His first pure' 
consisted of a tract of one hundred ami sixty 
acres in I'iatt county, bought of William 
'it. and he • ighl an ad- 
joining tract of the same size, on which be 
has erected <t of farm huildi: 
which he still owns. H« bought the I. 
White farm, comprising one hundred 
ten acn £ >ta Anna township, DeWitt 



1 84 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



county, which he later sold to V. S. Lindsey, 
and then purchased the A. Jones farm of 
one hundred and sixty acres, on which he 
lias built a new house and barn. He pur- 
chased forty-four acres near it of the M. 
Johnson heirs, and the old Clearwaters farm 
of forty and a half acres near Farmer City, 
mi which lie erected a good residence and 
barn. Besides t hi- property lie owns six 
hundred and forty acres of land in Stafford 
county, Kansas, near St. John, and at differ- 
ent times has owned other places, including 
the line residence now occupied by William 
Drybread. His ability as a financier is wide- 
ly recognized and he has done quite a suc- 
cessful! in loaning monej forhimself 
and eastern firms. Since [880 he has prac- 
tically lived a retired life in Farmer City. 
though he still looks after hi- investment-. 
I le purchased the Richard Webb property on 
•; Water street, moved the old residence 
hack, and in i < >o 1 built an elegant fourteen- 
with basement, it being the la 

and finest in the city. It i- supplied with 
hot and cold water, heated by steam and 
lighted by electricity, in fact it hi the 

conveniences of a city home. Besides this 
beautiful place Mr. Smith owns several 
houses, which lie rents, and some vacant lots 
in Farmer City. 

In religious faith he is a Universalist, 
and engaged in preaching for that denom- 
ination in l'i.att county from [868 t" 1875. 
lie is an Ancient ( >dd Fellow and a support- 

E the Republican party. 1 le ha- filled the 
office of justice of the peace, but has newer 
been an aspirant for political honors. A line 
writer and eloquent speaker, he has heen 
often called upon to exercise these talents. 
lie has written considerable for the press 
and has heen a regular correspondent to dif- 
ferent journals. The extracts from hi- pen 
include poetry as well as prose. As a busi- 



ness man he has been remarkably successful, 
and his success ha- come to him through en- 
ergy, labor and perseverance, directed by an 
evenly balanced mind ami b) honorable busi- 
ness principle-. 



AURELIUS E. NEWMAN. 

An interesting and eventful life was that 
01 Aurelius E. Newman, successful farmer, 
extensive traveler, large laud owner, and 
honored citizen, who came to an untimely 
death May <>. 1893, in DeWitt county, 
through the accident of runaway horses. In 
1 health and spirits he left 
his home in the early morning, hi- destina- 
tion being the home of his son-in-law, Elza 
it a mile distant, where he in- 
get a -talk rake. The wagon 
struck a stump, throwing him forward on 
, and causing the hi >rses ti 1 
run. It i- thought that he w.a- dragged at 

; forty rod- by the frightened horses, 
wh( 1 1 only when 1 me 1 if them fell ti 1 

the ground, .and it was then red that 

Mr. Xew man's neck had heen broken, and 
that a wound seven inches long had heen 
made in the side of hi- head. Hi- Ion- and 
useful and well-directed life was then re- 
called amid scenes of greatest sorrow, and 
the sympathies of the whole county were 
enlisted for the family to whom his taking 
off meant loneliness and hitter grief. 

' ii supposed remote Iri-h ancestry, .Mr. 
Newman was horn in Guilford county, 
North Carolina, October 1, 1827, and his 
life spanned sixty-five years, seven months 
and five day-. His parents, Joseph and 
Frances (Woodard) Newman, were born, 
reared and married in North Carolina, .and 
in their native- -tate their last years 
were spent. The father was a farmer 




A. E. NEWMAN. 



Ki«*ajffi^^rt&iSK 




MRS. A. E. NEWMAN. 



Till-. BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 






and wagorunaker, and it is said of him that 
he \\a- an expert in hi- line, and abli 
make a complete wagon from rough hewn 
timber. In the parental family were ten 
sons and daughters, Aurelius being fifth in 

f birth. I le wa- reared in his 
state and acquired the education of the pub- 
Iic • remaining on the home farm 

until 1847, when he faced the responsibili- 
ties of self-support with courage and del 
mination. Making his way to Illinois he 
worked on the farms ,,f Butler county for 
sixty-two and a half cents a day. and owing 
t.> the meagerness of his recompense suf- 
fered at times actual deprivation. In [£ 
he went down the Mississippi river with a 

• Load of ice t" Baton Rouge, Louisiana, 
returning afterward t< • I.a Salle county, 
Illinois, where he worked by the month 
until the spring of lie then started 
out to cr. iss the plains to California with an 

:eam. his way being thr 

the American river, where he staked 
out a claim and engaged in mining for a 
few days L er he brought up in Eldor; 
county, California, then I - .memo. 
finally arriving at a place cal 
the Yuba river, where he prosecuted his 

until 1852. The same 3 1 
he returned east via Panama, and then b 

from Greytown to New Orleans, 
from where he continued his journej 

rlc-st. .11. and thence to Rocky Mound. 
Virginia. I r into Kortl 

lina, lie remained for a short time, and be- 

• many weeks was back in La nit- 
ty. 'Mini 

In 1853 Mr. Newman came to Ik-Witt 
inty, where he worked by the month 

and then bought one hundred and 
of land on section thirty-one, 
Tunbridge township, which he proceeded 
improve, and where he lived for man, 



In 1865 he 1m night f' 

township, upon which he moved his family, 
and later added 1 this prop- 

erty. This farm was disposed "' a couple 
of years before his death, and he then bought 
the land now occupied by his wife and chil- 
li. A man of u""d judgment and finan- 
cial ability, he was the soul of industry, 

by the fact that vv 11 

unaided efforts he accumulated property 
valued at $ His fust laud in I.a 

st him one dollar p. 
and the deed for the same he received the 
he became 1 

In 1856 Mr. Newman married Sanian- 
tha Troxell, a native of DeWitt county. Illi- 
nd a daughter of Frederick and J 
['roxell, who came to DeWitt county 
in the early days, being among the pi 
He died in Kansas, while his \ in 

DeWitt county. Of this union there 
born seven children, four of whom are 1 
living: Albert died at the .r 

died when tv 
now Mrs. 1 1 tig, living 

I and sixty acres 'in I . 11- 

ship, and has one child. 

lues on the home place with his mother, and 
held the school tn inn 

if Jl 'III! 

ship, and has a daughter . and Fran- 

is the wife of Benjamin S farmer 

iwnship. Mr. New man \ 
a member of the Christian church, and dur- 

his entire life lived up to t! 
tile ii' iblest and bi 



:l\" 11. TYLER, M. D. 

There is no profession mot 

talent than the medical. Advancement 
among its representatives must he 



190 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



the price of earnest, persistent and conscien- 
tious effort; it must depend, too, upon 
strong intellectual force, readiness in grasp- 
ing a situation and correctness in applying 
theroetical knowledge to the needs of suffer- 
ing humanity. Keen discrimination is, 
therefore, one of the concomitants of suc- 
and a nicety of judgment In tic under- 
stood by the laity is necessary to one who is 
nut content with mediocrity, but would gain 
a position among the successful lew. Dr. 

.11 the qualificatii 
which go l" make the skilled physician, and 
to-day he is the oldest medical practitioner 
and i m|" I >c\\ in ci unity, lie is hon- 

d by the profession and the pub 
hi- life merited the confidence ami 

respect of his fellow men. 

A native of (Hum. the Doctor was born 
in Mansfield, August _'.). 1827, his parents 
thy and I I y- 

ler. I lis paternal gi icr, Nathan Ty- 

|< 1 . Irish extraction. His s< m, Tim- 

was a native of Maine and 
served his country in the war of 1812. After 
arri ;' maturil married 

Elizabeth Taylor, a daughter of Captain 
San aring man. v\', 

birtl red in Massachusetts. Mrs. Ty- 

ler Ijorn at Cap husetts, 

and By 

her marriage she became the mother of a 
large family, but the Doctor is now the only 
sun I he father died at a comparative- 

ly ( , and the mother passed away in 

Mansfield, ( Hum. in 1854, at the age of sixty- 
en. 

The Doctor pursued his education in the 
public schools near his boyhood's home and 
in Mansfield Academy, lie afterward en- 
engaged in teaching school for a short time, 
but determining to make the practic< 
medicine his life work, he began studying 



under the direction of Dr. J. \V. Griffith, in 
Perryville, Ohio. lie pursued his first 
course of lectures in the Starling .Medical 
College, at Columbus, and afterward began 
practice in Perryville, hut in 1855 he de- 
termined to try his fortune in a more western 
district and accordiilgl) made his way to I >e 
Witt county, Illinois, settling in the cit) of 
1 >c\\'itt. I [ere he began practice in connec- 
tion w ith 1 )r. B. S. Lewis. In the fall of 
1856 he entered the Rush Medical College 
of Chicago, where hi raduated in Feb- 

ruary of the following year. This partner- 
ship was maintained until 1862, since which 
time he has been alone in practice. From the 

inning he has enjoyed a large patron 
and. has easily maintained a 1 place 

in the ranks of the medical fraternity, for 
unlike many men, when years are encroach- 
ing upon them, he h contented him- 
self with the knowledge previously acquired, 
bul n continuously a student, read- 
ing and study carrying his investiga- 
ti' m forward alot 

ing in touch with the learning and work of 
his contemporaries in the profession. In 
[888 he sold his beautiful home in DeWitl 
to William Nixon and removed to ' 
locating on North ( eet. In [891 

ted a vers large and handsome residence 
and n South Center street, one of the 

finest homes in the city. Here he has an 
office supplied with every modern conven- 
ience and appliance of assistance in carry- 
ins; on his pr< ifessional work. I le is a mem- 
the National Medical Association, the 
American Medical Association and the De- 
Witt County Medical Association. The last 
named he aided to establish and is now the 
only living charter member. For many years 
he served as its president and has been very 
active in making its work effective and ben- 
eficial. 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



191 



i >n the Jjih of March, [861, th< 
was united in marriage to Miss Harriet 
Cain, a daughter of Charles C Cain, am 
nati " try popular in • 

ciety circles and as a member of van 
charitable ami church organizal 
In il<ls membership with the Methodist 1 •'.; 

il denomination and i- very active in the 
work of the church, the Sunday-school and 
society. For seven years she 
has been president of the Woman's Chris- 
tian Temperance Union and is an 1 
ad\ woman's suffrage. Her la' 

have been very helpful in promoting inter- 
having f'>r their object the benefit and 
uplifting of mankind, and her influence 

lely felt. Unto the Doctor and his wife 
were bom three children : Aldora, of wh 
mention is made later: Charles, who died in 
if six yeai^ : and Alice 
. at In une. 

The opinions and labors of Dr. Tyler 
have been a potent influence in political cir- 

-. and for many years lie has been known 
truest Republican. He was 1, 

I by the party with the nomination as a 
can eneral assembly in 1874, 

and ■ represent the twenty- 

ninth si of De- 

Witt and Mai inties, in the upper 

during the twenty-ninth 
ami thirty-: and left the imp 

his individuality upon tin i"ii en- 

acted at that time. He laid .red earnestl; 

ure the adoption of those me. lich 

he believed would contribute to the general 
1 and carefully considered each question. 
When he determined upon his course lie was 
unwavering in his allegiance thereto, and 
neither fear nor favor could bias him in his 
judgment. He was a conscientious 
lator and hi mmended him to the 

confidence of even those opposed to him 



litically. 1 member of Amon 

A. M.. and was its 
hi ninred master for twenty years, i 

hapter, R. 

A. M., and Clinton Council, X". 74. K. & 
1. Hi- emely busy and 

Whatever tends to prom 
the interests of his ; 1 and place be- 

fore man the key to the 1 1 that 

Mem. which we call life, attn 
his interest and tion. He i- a man 

character and i 
ly may ' the fi Ten 

linton. 

— * ■ » 

FRANCIS MAY. 

Francis M the influential 

citizei \y >rn 

July hi. [835, in P nty, < >hio. 1 le 

i- the s. .11 of David .May. who was born in 
the unty alu lUt 1 799. I li- motl 

Sarah iHicklei May. a native of the same 
1 in 1814 and <i 1 m- 

ber 29, i^74- David May w ohn 

May. a nati ania, whose an- 

1 lermany. 
John May, the grandfather of Francis May, 

>hio ami farmer b 

pation. He in 

ultural pursuits and he- 
came well t" do. lie and his wife reared a 
family of two girls and I whom 

id May. father of the subject of this 
sketch, was one. John May was an old-line 
Whig, and took an part in 

1 le was citizen and 

ligious man. He died in ! 
the age of eighty-three years. 

David May, father of our sul ined 

hi- education in his native state, ' >hio, in 
1 if the 1 'Id I that day. 



192 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



After attaining manhood he became a farm- 
er and owned one hundred and twenty acres 
of choice farm land in Ross county. In 
1855 lie sold his property and with his fam- 
ily, l>v team and wagon, made the overland 
trip t<> DeWitt county and bought one hun- 
dred acres "f land in Clintonia township. I le 
impn >\ ed the land and lived there fi lur years, 
and then moved to \\ ilson township upon a 
rented farm, where he lived until [863, when 
he then took up his residence in Harp town 
ship, on the farm he had purchased. There 
lie made his home till his death. February 
14. [890, at the age of eighty-four years. 
Though nol among the earliest settlers of 
the county, he did good pioneer service and 
desen es a place in the history of its pi< meers. 
In religious belief he was a Lutheran and in 
politics a Whig and Republican. To him 
and his wife were born eight children, of 
whom Francis is the oldest. His brother 5 ! 
and sisters are Miranda, wife oi tsaian 
I tavenport, who resides in Texas. Mr. I >a\ 
enport > ildier in Company A, Thirty- 

third Volunteer Infantry, of Illinois, and 
was in the >er\ice four years. Margaret 
married James Morrison; he is dead and 
res, 1 lintonia township, DeWitt coun- 

ty. Jacob, who enlisted in Company B, 1 >ne 
Hundred Seventh Volunteer Infantry, of 
Illinois, lives in Clinton. Susan, who mar 
ried Enoch Betzer, 1- a widow and lives in 
Nebraska. Henry resides in Nebraska. 1 
rus lives on his father's old farm in Harp 
township; Elsina married Samuel Newell 
and lives in Clintonia township. 

Francis May received his education in 
Ross county, Ohio, and came to DeWitt 
county w ith his parents. ! le li\ ed with them 
till he was twentx seven years of age, when. 
on August 6, 1862, he enlisted at Clinton, 
Illinois, in Company D, One Hundred Sev- 
enth Illinois Volunteer Infantry, under Cap- 



tain Kelly, and saw very active service. He 
started with Sherman on his inarch to the 
sea, going thirty miles south of Atlanta, 
when his corps returned to Tennessee, where 
they took part in the battles of Franklin and 
Nashville. They then went east to Wash- 
ington, thence down into North Carolina to 
join Sherman again. < hi the way they took 
the two forts of Anderson and Wilmington, 
and were present at the surrender of < icneral 
Johnston. The regiment was discharged al 
Salisbury, North Carolina, and was mus- 
tered oul at Springfield,- Illinois. Francis 
May, the honored soldier, returned home 
July 4, [865. lie began farming for him- 
self, and February _•_'. [867, he was married 
to Miss Eliza Baldwin, a daughter of Dan- 
iel and Hannah (Williams) Baldwin. Her 
father was horn m Kentucky and her mother 
was a native of < >hio. Mr. Baldwin died in 
( )hio m 1 865, at tl e; entj three 

mil his wife in [847, aged fort) five 
I hej were the pai ents 1 >i eight chil- 
dren, seven boys and one daughter, now the 
wife of the subject of this biography. 01 
the se\ en b >\ s, six w ere 51 ildiers, who 
in the war of the Rebellion, and the seventh 
was prevented from enlisting by ill health. 
Warren, who enlisted at the first call, was 
the only one wounded in the service oi 
country, and he but slightly. Of the seven 
loch, Clark and Warren are now dead. 
Uriah lives in Hardin county, Ohio, Jesse 
in Missouri, Philander in Mississippi, and 
I leiiry in ( )hio. 

Francis .May and his wife have a familv 
of five children: Lola, wife of William 
Kinnamon, resides in Wilson township: Ed- 
ward married Blanche Shaw and they re- 
side m Harp township; Lottie, Delia and 
I Larry are all at home. 

Mr. May owns and cultivates one hun- 
dred and sixty acres of highly improved. 



THi: BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 






land with well-kept buildii lie en- 

eral farming, ra - and 

cattle for the market, and makes a specialty 
of Shorthorn cattle, lie votes with the Re- 
publican party. He i* a member ft" Frank 
I . V R., at Clinton. I le ami 
ife are faithful members of the Pi 
ant Methodist church. 



MRS. MARY A. Y< IUXG. 

Mrs. Mary A. .; highl; 

med lady of Farmer City, where she has 
a very pleasant hemic that stands in the 
midst of a spacious lawn adorned with t 
ami flowers. She has in DeWitt county an 

tensive circle of friends and acquaintani 
many of whom have known her through a 
long period. She is the widow of William 
Young, a self-made man, who was 1 ■ • 1 1 ^ ass 
dated with the mercantile interests of he- 
Witt county. He was born in Edinburg, 
: tland, April 29, 1 *_>_•. a son of William 
ung, and as far hack as can he traced his 
ancestors v - of the land of 

hills and heather. In 1829 his parents re- 
moved to Liverpool, England, where they 

it their remaining days, and in that city 
William Young was apprenticed to a leading 
merchant. He also acquired a ga »d edu- 
cation, which served a* the ba*is of his suc- 
upled with his training in the store. 

Hearing favorable rejiort* of the oppor- 
tunities which America extended to her citi- 
zen*, and wishing to make the most of life. 
Mr. Young came to the United States in 
50, landing at New Orleans, whence he 
made his way up the Mississippi river to 

He then traveled over the coun- 
try to some extent. >-eekiiik r '■<■ favorable lo- 
cation, and finally took up his abode at 



Mount Pleasant, now Farmer City, Hiiro 
Here he entered nix mi his business careei 

lerk in the empl >r. Jacob 1 

water and later he was with Mr. 1 
About i860 he 1 \ busi- 

ness on In* own account, buying the old 
Brewster residence, which he converted into 
a store. It stood on the present site of the 
in. This buildii 

yed by lire in the conflagration which 

ept over much of the city in 1871, but phce- 
nix-like the storeof Mr. Youi 1 'in the 

ashes. I leerected a double brick building, but 
in June. 1879, tin* was also burned and he 

m built a business block adjoining the 
-He now occupied by hi* son Thomas. There 
he continued in tin :itil 

1891, when he retired from the Hade, lb- 
had enjoyed a liberal patronage through 
many years, resulting from his earnest desire 
to please, hi* reasonable prices and his 
straightforward business method*. Thus 
hi* income was annually augmented until 
he was in ; :i of a handsome com- 

petence. At an early day. in connection with 
a Mr. A. S. Bissell, he patented the Reading 
cultivator, which was one of the »uc- 

- nil machines here. Soon after the or- 
ganization of the I"ir*t National Bank, Mr. 
Yi >ung sen ed 1 >ne year a* I* >. kkeeper. 

In 1853 occurred the marriage of Mr. 
Young and Mi** Mary A. Bowser, who was 
born in Preble county, Ohio, while their 
wedding was celebrated in Warren county. 
Illinois. The lady is a daughter of 
ami Elizabeth (Maning) Bowser. Her fa- 
ther was a native of Pennsylvania and was 

n of Guy Bowser, who was born in < ier- 
manv. The former, at the age of twenty- 
five year*, removed from the Keystone state 
to Ohio ami in 1N5J located in Warren 
county, Illinois. Rater he resided in Iowa 
and then in Missouri. Throughout hi* act- 



194 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



ive business career he followed farming. It 
was his plan to buy and improve a farm and 
then sell it and in this way he prospered, 
making judicious investments in his land. 
which brought to him a good return, fie 
died in Boone county, Missouri, at the age 
of eighty-one, and his wife passed away four 
years later, at the same age. Their children 
were John, Hannah. Henry. Mary A.. The- 
ophilus and Thomas, all of whom reached 
adult age. 

The marriage of .Mr. and Mrs. YQling 
was blessed with six children: Walter Scott, 
<me of the leading real-estate and insurance 
men of the county, living in Farmer City, 
married Sarah M. Hurley, a daughter of 
John Hurley, and they have five children. 
Mabel 7... Zelpha 1'... Jane Mane. Atha A. 
and Wallace S. ; Robert Bruce, who is cash- 
ier of the State Bank '>f Clinton, wedded 
Clara Harwood, and their children are 
Emery, Bruce, Aleda and Harwood; Celia 
Belle died at the age of fourteen years; Will- 
iam Wallace died at th< twenty-two 
months; Zelma, one of the popular young 
ladies of Farmer City, is at home with her 
mother: and Thomas, who is engaged in the 
grocer) bu ty, wedded 
Maude Gilbert and has one child. Melva. 

In 1872 Mr. Young erected a line n 
dence on what was then the Crawford farm. 
but i^ now within the city limits. It is a spa- 
cious home, beautifully situated, ami the in- 
terior furnishings and exterior adornments 
indicate the cultured and refined taste of the 
family. In his political views Mr. Young 
was a stanch Democrat, but never aspin 
office, although lie once acted as city tr< 
nrer. lie was reared in the old school I' 
byterian church and always adhered to that 
faith. His life was pright and hon- 

orable and when lie was called to his final 
rest June 23, [893, the community mourned 



the loss of one of its most valuable citizens, 
a man whose record was in every way 
worthy of emulation and who enjoyed the 
unqualified confidence and regard of his 
many friends. Mis. Young and her daugh- 
ter, Zelma. spent the winter and spring of 
1901 in various districts of California and 
anions; the mountains of the Pacific slope, 
and on their return broughl to their many 
friends valuable souvenirs of their trip, 
which are high!) prized l>\ the recipients. 
Mrs. Young and her daughter are \er\ pop 
ular in the best social circles of Fan 
City and their home is noted for its gracious 
and genen >us hi ispitality. 



JEREMIAH DAVENPORT. 

Jeremiah Davenport, a prominent retired 
farmer of VVeldon, late of Creek township, 
was horn in Clintonia township, this county. 
February to, 1839, a son of Isaiah and 
Nancy ( ( ihipley ) I >avenport, both natives of 
Kentucky. His paternal grandfather was 
horn of Irish p in North Carolina. 

Later he removed to Kentucky and in [824 
came to Illinois and settled in Morgan coun- 
ty, later moved to DeWitt count), long be- 
fore DeWitl county was organized. Here 
he lived as a farmer till his death in [837. 
His wife was Miss Elizabeth Stewart, and 
to them were horn eight children, of whom 
two were sons. Hugh and Isaiah. The lat- 
ter, who was our subject's father, was horn 
in Casey county. Kentucky, in [814, and in 
[824 came west with his parents and settled 
in Morgan county, hut soon after came to 
DeWitt county, before it was organized, 

where he tilled the soil for a livelih 1. 

Later he moved to Texas township and then 
to Creek township, near Lane station, where 
he died in [885. He was a soldier in both 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 






the Black I lawk and Mexican war-. For 
his first wife he chose Miss \*ancy Cliipli 
and they were blessed with twelve children, 
namely: Elizabeth, who became Mrs. fohn 
Linbert; Sarah A., who married John Ben- 
nett; Lucy S., now widow of Jerry Shu- 
maker; Jeremiah, our subject; Alsorena, 
now Mrs. A. T. Corner; Hugh ami Will- 
iam; the other five dying in infancy. His 
•lxl choice wa-- Miss Jane, daughter of 
brie! Bennett, of Creek township. Hi- 
nd marriage resulted in the birth of six 
children, a- foil fbrie' I'..: Green 1.. : 

Laura B., who became the wife of Ami; 
Bell; John; Goldman, and Nancy A., who is 
now Mrs. 1 louglas Sutton. 

Jeremiah Davenport was reared in < 

- and Creek townships, tin- coun- 
ty, and .>n attaining his majority he began 
life a- a farmer in (.'reek township, but in 
I to Missouri. When the Civil 
war broke out he was a member of the Mis- 
militia and entered the govern- 
ment service in August, 1862, as a nun 
of Company A. Thirty-fifth Missouri Volun- 
teer Infantry. He took part in s< kir- 
mishes; battle of Helena. Arkansas. July 4. 
3, and 1 in the battle at Shell 
Mound, Mississippi, the same year, and 
July 16, 1 Si .5. was honorably discharged 
m the United Si For eij 

sided in Missouri, hut at the end 

•hat time, in 1869, he returned to (reek 

nship, where he purchased eighty a< 

' ind, to which he - ntly added 

tw< • -. making a very desirable farm 

•ne hundred aero, which he placed under 

a I of cultivation. Here he 

mained for several f a 

ing disposition, working early and 1 
he was enabled in the year 1 
the care- of the farm and move to Weldon, 
where he ha- since lived a retired life. 



( >n January 28, 1S5S. he led to tin 

tar Mi-- Sarah I., daugl ihn 

and Rel 

township. To this \ ouple were born 

five chil • whom four jrrcw I 

turity, namely: Laura, who became M 

her Dillavan; Marion C. ; Farn B., who 
became the wife of Gilbert l m; ami 

John. All 

who married M me. and 

the old homestead. 

Mr. Davenpeirt and wife are membei 
the Shiloh United Brethren church, and the 
Abner McNier Post, X I. A. R 

Weldon. Politically he affiliates with the 
1 )em< cratic party. 



ALDORA J. TYLER, M. 1 >. 

Dr. Aldora J. Tyler is the only lady phy- 
ian practicing in DeWitt county. Her 
reer pn that the sterner - 

have no monopoly upon 

ntative of t ; ier 

place in its ranks in this porfion 
than Dr. Tyler, whose broad and com] 
hensive km ami accurate skill h 

en her pre many who 1 

much longer been followers 
art. She ha- always resided in DeWitt 

nty ami I >r. J. 11. Tyler. 

She attended the hi{ 

city — DeWitt — ami was afterwai cut 

in the Weslevan l"ni\ 1 

111 life work she matriculated in 
Woman'- Medical ' 
where she \ 

dent of het ml then spent I 

month- in the h of that institution in 

■ aining was broad and tl 
gh, the theoretical knowledge of th 



196 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



room being supplemented by the practical 
work in the hospital. Her equipment was 
thus unusually good, and returning to Clin- 
ton she found that her talent and skill in 
the profession --nun won recognition in a 
liberal patronage, and it was nol long before 
she held a place in the medical profession in 
the o unit) sea <ni\ to nunc. 

In 1 Nil) Mr. Aldora Tyler pursued a 
post graduate course in Mew York City. 
She is a member of the DeWitt Count) 
Medical Societ) and served for one year as 
its president, where her knowledge of parlia- 
mentary law was demonstrated in the able 
way in which she handled the discussions 
and conducted the meetings of the organi 
zation. The splendid equipment in the of- 
fice of Dr. Tyler and her father are of ma- 
terial assistance to her in her work. She 
has a large consult! tice and is the 

family physician in many a household. Deep 
and earnest is her interest in her profession, 
arising from a love of scientific research and 
troin a sympathetic nature, without which 
the physician is never truly a success. I [er 
skill in general medicine is marked and she 
devotes special attention to the diseases of 
women and children. 

In social circles Dr. Tyler is also widely 
and favorably known. She has many warm 
friends throughout the county, gained out- 
side of professional life and her broad mind 
and interesting ' conversation render her a 
favorite in tln.se gatherings where intellect 
and true worth are received as passports. 



MRS. MARTHA WILSON. 

The present prosperity of the great com- 
monwealth of Illinois is largely due to the 
endurance, courage and bravery of the pio- 
neers who faced privations and overcame 



the terrors of the wilderness when the now 
flourishing towns were wild timber land 
and grass-grown prairies. Among those 
who are honorably enrolled on the enduring 
list of the pioneers of Illinois is Mrs. Martha 
(Vandeventer) Wilson, who was horn in 
Claybourn county. Tennessee, October 31, 
[819. She was a daughter of Jacob and Ra- 
chel (Hughes) Vandeventer. Jacob Vande- 
venter was born in Sullivan county, Ten- 
see, and his ancestry goes hack to a 
Scotch ancestor, while the Hughes family 
he traced hack to an Irish ancestor. The 
first American ancestor of the Vandeventer 
family came to this country soon after the 
Re\ > flutii >n. 

Jacob Vandeventer and wife were mar- 
ried in Sullivan county. Tennessee, and later 
the) moved i" Claybourn county, that 

stale, and 111 the fall of [83] the) settled oil 

the hanks of the north branch of Salt Creek, 
in what is now Wilson township. There 
they took up one hundred and sixty acres 
ol timber and prairie laud ami erected a 
house, which contained four rooms, two 
below and two above. In one of the lower 
rooms a tire place was built and there all the 
cooking and baking was done. The bed- 
steads were the old "cord" ones and they 
had great fat feather beds to put on them. 
Jacob broke up the land and raised whi 
and corn, and ai an early date all of it had 
to he hauled by team to Chicago. Several 
farmers would start together on Mom 
morning and if they met with no delays 
would get hack by Friday night. They 
would haul in their produce and bring back 
the necessary provisions and clothing. The 
fall the familv settled in Wilson township 
was the year of the great snow and Mrs. 
Wilson distinctly remembers the hardships 
they all suffered and wonders that any es- 
caped. 




MRS. MARTHA WILSON. 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



"99 



To Jacob ami Rachel Vandeventer were 

1). tii four ijirls and threi John; 

ivid, who was a minister of the Cuml 
land Presbyterian church; .Martha, now 
Mrs. Wilson; Mary, who is now Mrs. Rut- 
ledge, and she lives in the township of that 
name, this county, the township being ca 
after her husband; Mahala. deceased, and 
her twin sister, Marana. who married a Mr. 
Hurley, and they live in Iowa; lame-, who 
is also deceased, Jacob Vandeventer died 
in 183; s nty years, and is buried 

in the LeRoy cemetery. The mother died 
me of Mrs. Wilson at the 
ghty-three and is also buried 
in LeRoy cemetery. Both these good 1 
pie were Presbyterians of the old school. 

Mrv Wilson lived with her mother until 
she married, in [838, Edward Wilson, who 
was born in Ohio, and was a son of Asa 
Wilson. Asa Wilson was S tch descent, 
and an account <>t" the Wilson family will he 
found in the sketch of Andrew Wilson, :■ 
nephew of Edward Wilson, which will lie 
fmind elsehere in this volume. Edward 
Wilson and the father of Andrew Wilson 
came to this country together. Edward Wil- 
son located on what is now section thirty- 
five. Wilson township 1 the township is 
named for him), and when he married, Mrs. 
Wilson's mother gave her forty acres ad- 
joining the property of Mr. Wilson. This 
land, together with his own. Mr. Wils 
cultivated and resided upon until his death. 
which occurred in May. 1861. He is buried 
in Walter's cemetery, and he attained the 
of sixty year> when he died. To hhn- 
and wife were lx.rn the following chil- 
dren, three of whom are ww living: 
James, deceased, married, and his widow 
resides in DeWitt and has five children: 
Rachael, deceased: Noah married ( allie 
Last, and he lives in Clinton and he has one 



child. Maude, who married William Xael. 
lave two children: Sarah, de- 
Mary, deceased: Isaiah lives in Rut- 
ledge township, and he is married and has 
two children. Ella and Ethel, and these two 
are both married: Mahala. deceased; Louisa 
married a Mr. Spidle and -he resides with 
her mother in Clinton; one child died in in- 
fancy : James, deceased. 

When Mr. Wilson died he left his wife 
with a family of small children and. a farm 
of one hundred and sixty acres to man; 
and the way she succeeded in doing both 
would retlect credit upon anyone. She lived 
upon this farm until about 1SS5. when • 
purchased a pleasant home on North Madi- 
son ami East Julia street-, in Clinton, Illi- 
nois, and there she has since resided. Mrs. 
Wilson well remembers the early days of 
the county and the hardships endured by all 
the people at that time. The wolves would 
come tip to the very door of the cabin, as 
did also wild game of all kinds, and the In- 
dians passed up and down the hanks of the 
creek in front of their little home, often in 
crowd- of two ami three hundreds. After 
her husband's death Mrs. Wilson went to 
market at Wapella. which was eight miles 
distant, on horseback, with her butter, eggs 
and bacon in a large willow basket in front 
of her and one of the children on behind. 

was a woman of keen intellect, and thor- 
oughly understood farming in all its details. 
This excellent farm she now rents and is 
very proud of. forty acres of it never hav- 
ing passed from her possession since it was 
given her by her mother at the time of her 
marriage, and it is a portion of the original 
land taken up by her father in 1831. Mrs. 
Wilson is a stanch member of the Presby- 
terian church of Clinton and is a lad) of 
rare judgment, kindly hospitality and gentle 
character. Many women placed a- she was 



200 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



with a large family on her hands and alone 
on a tract of only partially improved land. 
would have given up in despair, but such 
was not the character of Mrs. Wilson. With 
determination she conquered the difficulties 
and had the satisfaction of seeing her chil- 
dren and their children after them, grow up 
about lu-r and her propert) become some of 
the most valuable farm lands in the state. 
She is In mured by her neighbors and friends 
as well a- beloved by her family, and is a 
in .1 ilc type of the American woman who 
have d.me s. > much towards placing the 
American nation in it s position to-day. 



T. B. SAM 11 I. 



The deserved reward .if a well-spent life 
i- an In inured retirement from business in 
which tn enjoy the fruit- of former toil. 

day, after a useful ami beneficial career. 
T. I'.. Samuel is quietly living at hi- pl< 
ant In une in llallsville. lie was born near 
Indianapolis, in Marion county, Indiana. 
March 23, 1836, and 1- a son of Rol 
Samuel, whose birth occurred in Virginia 
in 171)7. Hi- paternal grandfather, Si|uirj 
Samuel, was also a native of Virginia, from 
which state he removed to Kentucky about 
1805, being among the I ttlers of 

urbon county. Robert Samuel grev 
manhood in Kentucky and married Ellen 
Anderson, a native of that state, where they 
continued to make their home until ai 
the birth of three of their children. They 
then remo Indiana, becoming pio- 

rs of Marion county, where in the midst 
of the forest the father of our subject 
cleared and improved a farm, and he sub- 

uently owned and operated a sawmill. 
In the fall of 1 S 5 1 he came t< > DeWitt coun- 



ty, Illinois, and purchased a tract of wild 
land in Harnett township, t" which he sub- 
sequently added until he had a nice farm. 
There he died in March. 1S74. his wife in 

mber, [870. They were the parents 

leven children who reached year- of ma- 
turity, hut only three are now living, 
namely: John 1\, a resident of Pierson, 
Illinois; Charles G., of Clinton; and T. B., 
1 if this review . 

Our subject -pent the first fifteen years 
of hi- life in the county of his nativity, and 
then came with the family to DeWitt coun- 
ty. Illinois, where lie engaged in breaking 
prairie for three years and aided in the 
ardu sk of developing a new farm. 

On leaving the parental roof at the age of 

teen years, he commenced farming on 
vented lain!, and while thus engaged 
al-o owned and operated a threshing ma- 
chine for ten seasons or more. In [866 he 
made hi- first purchase of land, consist 
of sixty acre-, which he operated in con- 
nection with other lands that he rented. 
Selling hi- pn perty in 1S7J. he removed to 
Xeo-ha county. Kansas, on account of his 

ih. and while hi- smis engaged in farm- 
ing he turned his attention to the Stock 
business. In the fall of 1S74 he returned 
to this county, bringing with him one hun- 
dred head of cattle, which he fed for mar- 
ket, lie rented a farm of two hundred and 
forty acre- in Harnett town-hip. mi which 
lie lived for fifteen years, and in connection 
with it- operation continued t' in 

buying and -hipping stock, lie subse- 
quently purchased one hundred and twenty 
acres of land and later bought an adjoining 
tract of forty acre-, where he made hi- home 
until 1889, when he rented the farm and 
moved to Ilall-ville. Purchasing a half in- 
terest in a -tore, he was engaged in mer- 
chandising at that place for two year-, ami 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



20I 



then sold out and returned to the farm, but 
in 1895 he again came to Hallsville, where 
he engaged in the grocery bus 1 two 

'hi disposing of that business, he 
became interested in the grain trade :it Ken- 
ney, where he spent several months. After 
living retired for a year or so, he bought an 
interest with his son in the grain business 
at Bos well, Indiana, where he rem . 
fifteen months. Since then he has lived a 
retired life ;it Hallsville, Illinois, enjoying 
a well-earned n 

In Barnett township Mr. Samuel was 
married, February 3, 1859, t" Miss Eliza- 
beth I. Williams, who was born in Posej 
county, Indiana, and was a child of thir- 
teen years when she came to DeWitt county, 
Illinois, with her father. Simon Williams, 
in 1851. By this union were born ten chil- 
dren, as follows: Spencer A. married and 
died, leaving one daughter, Maud: Amedia 
J. i^ the wife of William Conner, of Bar- 
nett township, and they have two children. 
Elva and Willis: Willi- and Frank are en 
I in the grain business in partnership 
at Bos well, Indiana; Lora B. married 
Charles Downs and died, leaving one son, 
Dudley, who now finds a home with our 
subject; llattie is the wifi I. Kirby, 

of Barnett townshilp, and has two sons, 
Harold A. and Warren: Ella married John 
II McKinney and is now deceased: llet- 
the wife of W . A. Yoder, agent for 
the Illinois Central Railroad at Mt. (Hive. 
Illinois, and they have one child, Maurine; 
Thomas E. is employed in a st,,r, 
town, Illinois; and at home with 

parents. 

Mr. Samuel and his wife and daughter 
are memb the Hallsville Christian 

church. Politically he has always been 
identified with the Democratic party since 
casting his first presidential 



Stephen A. Douglas in i860, but has 
eared for political positions, prefi 
give his tune ami attention t" his 
interests, lie started out in life for hi 
empty-handed, hut. being industrious 

ic and enter] 
pered, and is to-daj one of the 1 
citizens of his community, as well 
the honored residents of Hallsville, 



\\ II. I AM ARG< I. 



Prominent among the business me: 
Clinton is William Argo, who throug 
life has been closely identified with the in- 

1 is now pn 
the State Hank at that place. He was born 
1 mi the 20th of March. 1S4.4. in th( 
where he still resides, and Alex- 

ander and Eliza A. 1 Walravei 
llis paternal grandfather was Moses Vrgo, 
win 1 was born in New I 1 French 

try, and from that state removed t<> 
Virginia and later to < Ihii 1. I Ic w 
farmer by occupation and a soldier of the 
of 1 S 1 _> . 

Alexander Argo, the father <>f our 
ject, was born in the Buckeye state in 
and was reared b) his uncle, Robert Wat- 
kins, with whom he served i r ap- 
prenticeship t" the wagonmaker's trade. 
which he continued to follow t" somi 
tent throughout his active life. 
Me acquired some property in Ohio, which 
he traded for a lot of spinning wl 

lie shipped by boat dow 11 the ( Hiio 
and up the Mississippi air 
t< • Pekin, this s' then 

• • land to Clinton and 
throughout i ! »n, manj being still 

found in I >e\\ nt county. M 



202 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



visited this locality in [840, ami purchased 
the old homestead of Daniel Newcomb, but 
did not locate permanently here until 1844, 
when he opened a wagon shop in .Clinton 
and made by hand the first and most sub- 
stantial wagons used by the pioneers oi the 
vicinity. He also devoted some time to 
the cultivation and improvement of the 
propertj purchased in [840. Being a man 
of good business ability and sound judg 
mem. he acquired a fortune, and was re- 
garded as one of tlie leading citizens oi 
nti m The railroad now passes 1 <\ er 
the site of his second shop. He had just 
began the erection of this when the rail- 
road was surveyed, and. as it passed over 
ihe site, he moved it up town, where alter 
a time it was occupied by R. R. Craig. In 
early life Mr. ^rgo was a member of the 
Methodist church, and was instrumental in 
establishing and building the church in 
Clinton, of which he was an active member 
until death. In politics he was first a 
Whig and later a Republican. lie died at 
his home, on the corner of Madison and Jet' 
ferson streets in [883, honored and re 
spected by all who knew him. Ills estim- 
able wife, who was horn September 19, 
[815, in Clermont county, Ohio, passed 
away August 17. [899. They were the 
parents of si\ children, namely: Mrs. 
l'hilena Campbell; Samuel M.; Emanuel 
»,.; Thomas J.; William, our subject; and 
Martin Luther, who died in infancy. 

William Argo received his early train- 
ing Upon the home farm and obtained his 
literary education in the public schools of 
the neighborhood. In iSj<> he embarked 
in the ice husincss with his brother Eman- 
uel, and continued to carry on that husi- 
ness in Clinton until 1899. when he sold 
out. The brothers own considerable real 
estate, including eighty acres of fine farm- 



ing land on section n, I hup township, and 
two hundred and sixty-five acres on section 
32 and 33. the same township. On the 1st 
of July, [890, he assisted in the establish- 
ment of the Stale I lank of Clinton, which 
was organized with a capital of fifty thou- 
sand dollars. Its first officers were Thomas 
II. Slick, president; Dr. J. X. Wilcox, vice- 
president; and James II. Harrison, cashier. 
Late '■ Slick was succeeded by Thomas 
M. Levett as president, and since then J. I'.. 
Holderman and D. T. Ga) have also tilled 
that office, while Mr. Argo has served in 
that capacitj since [898. Dr. Wilcox has 
always been vice-president, and the other 
officers at the present time are Lewis Mur- 
pby, cashier; George G. Argo, assistant 
cashier; and A. R. Young, bookkeeper. 

Ihe hank purchased a new block erected hv 
lohu ( i. Cackley, and have built a tire and 
burglar-proof vault with deposit boxes and 
. nine lo,k safe. It is now in a flourishing 
condition, ami is considered one of the most 
reliable financial institutions of the county. 
lis success i s eeiiaiulv due in a large mei 
ure to Mr. \.rgO, who is one of the most 
conservative business men and ablest finan- 
ciers of Clinton, lie is a man of keen dis- 
crimination ami sound judgment, and in all 
his undertakings has been quite successful, 
lie occupies a prominent position in husi- 
ncss circles, and is a worthy representative 
of an old and honored family of DeWitt 
count v. 



GEORGE W. MOORE. 

George W. Moore, now deceased, was 
one of the leading men of Wilson township. 
1 >eWitt count v. Illinois, and during his later 
davs he resided on section thirty, lie was 
horn in Casey count v. Kentucky, in Fehru- 




GEORGE W. MOORE. 




MRS. GEORGE W MOORK. 



THE BI< (GRAPHICAL REC< >RD. 



-°7 



ary. iSjo, and he w; of Henry and 

Elizabeth (Cooley) Moore. 

lli- education was received in the com- 
mon schools of Kentucky, and although the 
advantages wore few, he managed to secure 

od foundation for it. to which he added 
during his life by reading. In 1830 he re- 
moved with his parents to Sangamon coun- 
ty, Illinois, but later moved back to Ken- 
tucky, and in [843 was there married 
Miss Matilda Porter, who was bqrn in Cas 
county, Kentucky. She was a daughter of 
Isaac and Margaret (Grammer) Porter, 
both of whom were native- of Virginia, and 
who were married in their native state and 
moved to Kentucky, \yhere they lived and. 
died,. Mr. Porter was a well-to-do fanner, 
and he and his wife were the parent- of nine 
children, namely: Isaac; Samuel, deceased; 
John, deceased; Mrs. Porter; Jeffere 
who died in infancy: Abigail, who resides 
in Casey county, Kentucky: Lucinda, who 
married James Mitchell and they reside in 
Washington county, Illinois; James; and 
Delia, deceased. 

After marriage our subject remained in 
Kentucky f< rs, then returned 

to Sangamon county. Illinois, where he 
mained until he removed to DeWitl county 
just a few day- prior to the assassination 
of President Lino 'In. Mr. Moore settled 
upon eighty acre- of land which was partly 
improved in Wilson township, and there he 
-pent the remainder of his life. lli- days 
were peacefully spent in farming and he 
brought his land into a fine state of cultiva- 
tion. The buildings upon the place he ei 
ed, and he took great pride in keeping the 
entire ''arm in excellent condition. lite 

fence- were all kept in g 1 order; the 

hedges neatly trimmed, while hi- ham and 
building never allowed to get out ol 

repair. Not far from the house he planted 



a line orchard, a- well a- some shadi 

and his widow, who resides upon this model 

farm, can -ee the result of his careful man- 

nent "ii ever) side. Later Mr. Mot 
added forty acre- to hi- eighty acre- and the 
farm now consists of one hundred and 
twent) acre-. In addition he also owned 
sixty-five acre- of timber land in Wapello 
township, which he partly cleared. From 
this tine strip of timber land Mr. Ma 
hauled the last load of wood the President 
ever used and he wa- an intimate friend 
Mr. Lincoln and never tired of relating en- 
tertaining incident- of the great man's 
kindly life. No man wa- to,, humble for 
his notice, and in his -ad death Mr. Mi 
always claimed the country received a blow 
from which it could never recover. 

A brother of Mr. Moore married a Miss 
Sarah Foster, who wa- a daughter of Aimer 
and Ellender (Moore) Foster, both of whom 
were native- of Virginia. Mr. ami M 
Foster were married in Kentucky and lived 
there a few years, then removed to K.n 
in the early fifties and there they died, he 
in 1887 at the age of sixty-five, and -he in 

07 at the age of seventy-thre< 
the brother of our subject and his wife \ 
horn the following family. Elvira n 
ried Thomas Highfield and the; 
in Kansas. Ellen married Henry Hick- 
man, and they have two children: R 
Nellie, who married L. II. Longbrake, and 
they have one child. George Wilbur; and 
Katie. Mr. Longbrake rents the farm 
Mr-. Moore, and they make their home 
her. Mary i". resides in Kansas. M 

|ohn and Miner an 
lia married William Goff, who 
in Kai samuel and I. 
side in Kansas. One child wa- l>orn 
to Mr. and Mr-. Moore, John Hamilton, 
hut he died in childhood. Mr. M e v\ 



208 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



Republican in politics, but would never ac- 
cept public office, believing thai he could 
serve his township better as a private citi- 
zen and also being absorbed in his duties 
pertaining to his farming life. Both he and 

his excellent wife early joined tile Methodist 
church and he always took an active part in 
its work. 'I'lie example of a good life well 
spent is great and no better heritage can he 
left than an untarnished name. Mr. Mo 
was a man whose whole life was without 
blemish. Hard-working and frugal he labor- 
ed earnestlj to provide for hi-- beloved wife 
and leave her in comfortable circumstances. 
To his neighbors he was always a kind 
friend, and no "lie in need ever appealed t" 
him in vain. His life was above reproach 
and he died as he had lived, a truly Christ 
man. In the township, among the church 
members, and more illy at his own 

fireside, is this good man missed, and his 
can never he tilled. 



VIES I. M< >RR< IVV. 

James 1 .. Morrow is one • arly 

and highly respected citi He- 

Witt county, residing on a fruit farm of 
forty acres on section [3, in Texas town- 
ship. He w; m the village of LeRoy 
Mel. can county. Illinois, on January ~. 
1840, and remained there until he was about 
twelve year .. when he moved with 
iarents t> 1 Bli ©mington, Illin 

The parents of James 1,. Morrow were 

■iard P. and Sarah I-".. 1 Williams 1 Mor- 
row, the former of whom was a native of 
the state of Ohio, and came to Illinois about 

50, locating in McLean county. By 
trade he was a saddler, and he followed that 



occupation for many years j n LeRoy, ami 
later in Bloomington, where he also en- 
gaged in the manufacture of brick. Upon 
coming to DeWitt counl\'. with Thomas 
Snell he engaged in the manufacture of 
brick, and one year later engaged in the 
business alone, following this interest in 
Texas township until about the time of his 
death, also doing some farming, llis 

;h occurred when he was aboul sixty- 
live years of age. Although a stanch Dem- 
ocrat, he had never accepted party publicity, 
although he was always interested in public 
affairs and ready to use his influence in the 
direction of improvements, llis burial was 
in Rose 'cemetery, t 'reek township, his 
widow survived him some nine years and 
died at the home of our subject, at the age 
of seventy-two years. For aboul nine 
le had been a helpless hut patient in- 
valid, and was the mother of nine children, 
live of the i .111 nix still surviving. 

James 1.. Morrow, of this sketch, ob- 
tained his education in the district scho 
of Texas township, and .is-isu-d his father 
both in his farming and in his brick-making 
erations until his death, and then took 
care of his loved mother, filling this filial 
duty with care and affection until her de- 
He took charge of the home place 
and farmed it. and still resides there. 

Mr. Morrow has planted his whole forty 
acres in fruit, and. nearly all of his trees are 
in bearing condition and are yielding great 
returns. Like his father, he i inch 

Democrat, hut has never sought office, al- 
though he consented to serve through one 
term as road commissioner. During that 
time he proved his capacity and inaugurated 
many needed reforms. 

The marriage of Mr. Morrow was in 
1 Si.i. in Clinton, Illinois, to Miss Amanda 



11 



IRAPHICAL RECi >RD. 






Miii. 'wen, who was a dau 

Mi ■ ttler of i 

Wit t county. Mr. Mc< 

isted foi in 

tin- ■ ling lieuten. 

pan wentieth Illin. -i^ Volunt< 

duty until tl 

urred at his 
home at Princeton, Bureau county, wh< 
number 
dren have been born to Mr. and Mrs. 
rrow, \ i. ■ : Le< ward, who in 

-ts his father in the 
fruit bu and who married Alii 

1 they have il : and 

n, who did not live be- 
infancy. 

marriage of Mr. 

lock, wb 'i"n 

in De\\ ity, and win 

nd Margaret ( Mam 
f( irmer ■ I >e\Vitt 

in tarn vn- 

leath occurred more than a 
p, at the fty- 

children have been born 
Morrow, viz : I. 
m April 4. the 

kvnship, and he has 
• h.-me all his life, obtaining hi- edu- 
n the tlistr :■ mi- 

ii, Frank, died at 
■ ■ 
Mr. Morrow has a vivid re n of 

unty when it was all prairie and 
timl>er land. There were but few build- 
very few school-hou 
which hurches. The men 

wh«> have changed all these conditions v 
tillers of the soil. DeWitt county i> a t< 

nial to the energy, the tireless industry 
ami the pn such men a- our 



subject and his honored fail they 

m all tl 
permanent bet the men who 

truly represent this county. 



JOHN HART. 

This well-known and honored resident 
a native of Ireland, 
and v ibout nini 

when he crossed the bi with his 

make their home in 
lie ■ itember 1 2, 

in I.. 

of Jai itherine i.\l 1 [art 

1" |"hn and Mai 
•. whi 1 were born in Dublin county, 
farmer in his 

land l' 

1 ears 

nam< father: John 

iter and came to the I 
hut later returned fo Ireland, where he died: 

ind William were both | 
the Roma lie church; 1 mar- 

ried M. McLoughlin; 1'.: e the 

1 in this 
county : Ann mar: . who 

hut .she is still livii 
Clinton; Catherine, now I, became 

the wife of I. Maehan. <>i tin The 

father lived t. » reach tin 
years and the mother about nim 

In Hart, our subj< 

ther. came to Wapella, DeWitt county, 
where he lived fur one year, lie tin 
tied in Clintonia township, where he |iur- 
1 a farm, and for thirty y< 
agricultural pursuits with m; 

At the time of his death, which 



210 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



occurred July 10, 1898, he was in his sev- 
enty-fifth year. His wife, who still resides 
on the old homestead, has reached the good 
'.M age of eighty. To this estimable 
couple wore bom nine children, as follows: 
John, the subject of this review; Bridget, 
now deceased; Mathew, of Springfield; 
Mrs. Maria Barry, of Springfield; Thorn- 
deceased; William. \\\\<> is now a road 
commissioner of Clintonia township; Peter, 
a fanner in the county; Michael, deceased; 
Patrick, a farmer in this county; and 
James, deceased. 

When John llart first came with his 
parents t" YVapella he worked in the rail- 
road shop as a fireman and helper for about 
ten years, lie then eatne to Clinton and 
accepted a position as engineer of 
Clinton Electric Light & Heat Company, 
which place he acceptably tilled for five 
years. At the end of this time he entered 
the Illinois Central Railroad shops, where 
he remained until .May 1. 1899, when he 
was appointed engineer of the Clinton 
water works, which was established in [887, 
and which in 1898 was remodeled and ■ 
larged, until to-day it is one of the fin< 
equipped water supplying establishments in 
the country. 

On August 1. 1877, a ceremony was 
performed which united Mr. llart in mar- 
riage with Miss Marj A. l'.urk. win. was 
born in Ohio August 12, 1857, and is 
daughter of Edward l'.urk. <.t" Wapella, Illi- 
nois. To them were horn six children, 
namely: William and Edward, machinists; 
Emmett, Paul and Leo. student-: and Jo- 
seph, an infant. 

< >ur subject has built a very pleasant 
home at the corner of South George and 
[efferson streets, and is a member of the 
DeWitt County Building Association, 
which he is a director. He lias always 



taken an active part in the progress of his 
adopted city, and has never withheld his 
support from any object which he believed 
would prove '•i public benefit, lli- hie has 
been an upright, honorable and useful one 
and he is held in high regard b) all who 
know him. 

— ■> » » - 

Jt MIX WIGHTWK K 

For almost fort) years John Wightwick 

was a rc>idei;t of Clinton and was one of 
us most highly respected citizens, lie \ 
a native of England, horn in Tenderten, 
Count) Knit. January 6, [827, and w.i 
son of John and eth Wightwick. The 

mother dying when our subject was very 
young, the father married again, his second 
union being with Miss Harriet Sidders. In 
1850 they came to America and settled in 
Joliet, Illinois, where lit- engaged in the 
lumber business until his death, which oc- 
curred in 1853. His wife died in Clinton 
in 1876, at the age of eighty-one years, and 
her remains were interred in Woodlawn 
cemetery. The children of the family were: 
John, our subject; Humphrey, a minister 
the established Church of England, who 
died in London; James. w ho came to 
America with his father and was associ- 
ated with him in business at Joliet. Illinois; 
and Elizabeth, deceased, wife of R. R. 
Crang. 

John Wightwick was educated in the 
common scln e o untrv. and 

m early age was apprenticed to a dry 

is merchant in Tunbridge, Wales, serv- 
ing seven years. On the expiration of that 
time he engaged in clerking for the same 
firm for eleven years. In September, 1853, 

r the death of his father, he came to the 
United States and first located in Chicago. 




JOHN WIGHTWICK. 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 






While there he was married in a parsonage 
on Clark street. May _• i . [854, to Miss 
rah Ann Appleton, to whom he was engaged 
before leaving England, and who came to 
this country t<> meet her husband. She was 

1 in England, July 31, [821, a daughter 
of John and Sarah Appleton. Her father 
was a merchant in Hampton street. Lou- 
don, dealing in only the very finest of g 
ceries. I le died r 2, 1852, at 
of fifty-six years, and was buried in the 
Islington churchyard, London. His wife 
had died eight years prior to this at the age 
of forty-five, and her remains were interred 
in the Henrietta street chapel vaults of the 
same city. Their children were: John, who 
died in infancy: Sarah Ann. now Mrs. 
Wightwick; John William, a resident of 
London; Ellen Elizabeth, wife of Thomas 
J. Addinsell, of Dubuque, Iowa; Thomas. 
; resident of llanley. Staffordshire, Eng- 
land; Maria, deceased, wife ■•!' Gale Smith: 
Emily Jane. Robert and Henry, all de- 
ceased. 

For three years Mr. Wightwick made 
his home in Chicago, where he held the 
sition of bookkeeper in a large wholes 
house, and then went to Aurora. Illinois. 
where lie took the business of his brother, 
Tames, who died a short time prior, and con- 
tinued in the dry goods business. Selling 
out in l86l, he then came to Clinton, where 
lie clerked for R. R. Crang for nine years, 
and then retired from business, having re- 
ceived a larg< from England. 

The children horn to Mr. and Mi's. 
Wightwick were as follows: I 1 1 Anna 
Maria died in [877. 1 _• 1 Elizabeth is liv- 
ing with her mother in Clinton, i.^i R 
Nellie is the wife of John < i. M. Appleton, 
who L engaged in the real estate business in 
Chicago, ami they have two children. Lou- 
ise and Lillian. 1 4 1 Emily Jane is the wife 
10 



Kcil, of Buffalo, New York, 
who is in the employ of the New York < Cen- 
tral Railroad Company, and they have four 
children: Herbert Wightwick, Ethel, Em- 
ily and I lelen. 

At the eventeen Mr. Wightwick 

became converted and joined the Methodist 
Episcopal church, and throughout life was 
an earnest and consistent Christian. He ma- 
terially assisted in building the Methodist 
church at Clinton and held the offices 
steward and trustee in the same. In politics 
he was an ardent Republican, hut could 
never he prevailed upon to accept official 
honors. He died November 29, [899, and 
was laid t" rest in the Woodlawn cemetery 
I !linton. His life was exemplary in many 

iects,and he gave an earnest support to 
those interests which were calculated to up- 
lift and benefit humanity, while his owtl 
moral worth was deserving of the high 
commendation. His wife still survives him 
at the age of eighty years, and at her beauti- 
ful home on East Main street. Clinton, is 
surrounded by many warm friends who 

J her in highest regard. 



MRS. C \K< (LINE TRENKLE. 

Mi's. Caroline Trenkle, of Farmer City., 
i-. a lady not less well known for her splen- 
did business and executive ability than for 
her social qualities which render her plei 

home a favorite resort among the best 
people of the city and locality in which 
resides. She is the widow of the late An- 
ton Trenkle, who was horn in Baden, < ier- 
many. a son of John and Catherine 1 Hen) 
Trenkle. who were also natives of the same 
country. The father died in earl) man- 

1 1 hut the mother attained to a ripe old 

age. 



214 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



In the country of his nativity Anton 
Trenkle followed farming until [853, when 
he came to the United States, believing that 
he would have better opportunities to secure 
;•. home of his own in this land than in the 
older countries of Europe, lie made his 
way in Menard county, Illinois, where he 
worked for ["homas Kincaid as a farm 
hand for eleven years at two hundred dol- 
lars a year, lie was thus employed until, 
as a result of his industry and economy, he 
had accumulated three thousand dollars. 
Then, in connection with his brother Jo- 
seph, he purchased a farm of two hundred 
and fourteen acres east of Petersburg, Illi- 
nois, for forty-five dollars per acre, and 
with characteristic energj began its devel- 
opment and further improvement. Later 
lie sold it fur sixtj five dollars per acre, 
thus realizing a handsome profit on his in- 
vestment. In [872 he came to DeWitt 
county. Illinois, and purchased the Ken- 
nan farm of two hundred acres in Santa 
Anna township. This is still in possession 
of his widow. In [860 Mr. Trenkle went 
to California, where he engaged in farming 
for two years, hut. preferring the broad 
prairies of Illinois as a more desirable pi 
to carry on agricultural pursuits, he re- 
turned to tins state and here engaged in 
the tilling ^i the s,,il until his life's labors 
were ended in death. 

In [868 Mr. Trenkle returned to Ger- 
many to visit his people and tell them of 
the possibilities which America offered to 
people of determination and enterprise. 
While there he formed the acquaintance of 
Miss Caroline Yeagle, who was horn in 
Baden in 1840. Desiring to come to 
America and thus improve her opportuni- 
ties, she came with Mr. Trenkle on his re- 
turn. The acquaintance thus formed 
ripened into love, and they were married 



in Springfield, Illinois, on the Kith of Oc- 
tober, [868. The lady is a daughter of 
Nicholas and Anna (Donner) Yeagle. Her 
parents are both now deceased, her father 
having passed awaj at the age of seventy- 
one, while her mother's death occurred 
when she was eighty six years of age. The 
marriage of Mr. and Mrs. Trenkle was 
blessed with nine children, who are a credit 
to the name. Anna M., the eldest, is the 
wife of Alfred Ploussara, a farmer of Rut- 
ledge township, by whom she has Eour chil- 
dren. Mane, Edwin, Charles and Louise; 
Minnie resides with her mother in Farmer 
City; Catherine was successfully engaged 
in teaching school for eight years and then 
married John J. Clifford, an engineer on 
the Illinois Central railroad, by whom she 
has two children, John and Margaret; An- 
thony, an agriculturist of McLean county, 
married Mary Howard and has two chil- 
dren, William and Raymond; Charles L. 
als. 1 carries on agricultural pursuits; John 
V is a stenographer in Chicago; Fred W. 
follows stenography in Bloomington, Illi- 
nois; Caroline J. is with her mother; and 
Martin A. is a resident farmer of DeWitt 

county. 

Mr. Trenkle provided a very comfort- 
able home for his family, lie made many 
improvements upon his farm, including the 
erection of a new residence and other build- 
ings, and at his death he left to his family 
one of the finest farms in the county, he- 
sides other property. He was a self-made 
man. resolute and energetic, and his care- 
fully directed labors brought to him grati- 
fying and well-deserved prosperity. He 
held membership in the Catholic church and 
was esteemed by all who knew him lor his 
many admirable traits of character. 

After the death of her husband, realiz- 
ing that the care of the family devolved 



THE r.IOCKAPHRWL RECORD. 



-'5 



upon her. Mrs. Trenkle began to plan w; 
whereby she might aid her children 

rt ill life. She 1» mght 
hundred and twenty acre- of land in Rut- 
ledge township, known as the Ha/el farm, 
built a new barn there, and now her 
daughter and her husband, Mr. ami Mr-. 
• :a. are li that place and have 

made it a highly cultivated tract of land. 
Next Mrs. Trenkle pur. ne hundred 

ami sixty acres in West township, McLean 
:iy. erected a new residence, and An- 
thony resides there. By another purcha 
made in December, i<mx>. Mrs. Trenkle be- 
came the owner of what was known as the 
ible property in Farmer City, and on that 
land she erected a very pleasing and at- 
tractive modern residence, in which she i- 
living with her two daughters. Here 
has a tine residence, surrounded by well- 
kept grounds, and the home is the center 
a cultured society circle. Mrs. Trenkle 
cceptional business ability. She 
y has the power to plan, but is de- 
termined in executing her plans, and 
throughout the community she is respected 

her capable management and keen 
crimination in business affairs. She has 
made many friends in DeWitt county, and 
and her family enjoy the warm regard 
ill who know them. 



MARIS WALDEN. 



Among the soldier-citizens of Wi! 
township. DeWitt county. Illinois, one of 
the most prominent is Maris Walden, who 
section 27 and was l>orn at Ran- 
dolph <ir. ■'. e. McLean county. Illinois, De- 
cember 24. 1S40. He is a son of William 
and Jane ( Starr ) Walden. 



William Walden was a native of Ken- 
tucky and the mother was a native of North 

•lina. ami they were married in Indiana. 
In 1830 the parents removed to McL< 
county, Illinois, ami in [842 they located in 
Wilson township, DeWitt county, and here 
the father worked by the day for thirteen 
years, at the end of which time he ha 

fkient money to purchase some timber 
land and a few acres of wild prairie land. 
At the time of his death he was the j. 

f four hundred and fifty .< 
well-cultivated farm land ami had 
helped his tcquire tine farms. Al- 

though they began their married life as poor 
people, they accumulated considerable of 
this world's goods. The father died in 
sixty-six, and his widow sur- 
vived him until [889, when ■. died, 

1 eighty-four, and both are interred 
their old homestead. In pities the father 
was a Democrat until 1856, then became 1 
Republican, ami held the office of school 
director until a few years prior to his death. 
He was also township clerk for several 
years. He and hi- estimable wife were 
both Methodists, and he often rilled vacant 
pulpits. For a long time services would be 
held in his barn and house, as there was 
n«. other place of worship in the neighb 
hood. The unfortunate always found a 
friend in these two good people, and Mr<. 
Walden was never too tired or busy to pre- 
pare a meal to anyone who came to her 

r hungry. Their names will l>e long re- 
membered by many a person whose suffer- 
ing was relieved by the gentle charity that 
never sought to lie known of men. 

To William Walden and wife were I m ■ni 
thirteen children, of whom seven grew to 
maturity, namely: James. d; Fli- 

jah. who lives in Wilson township; Isaac, 

eased; Thomas, who resides in Wil 



2l6 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



township; Maris, our subject; William P., 
who lives in Wilson township; Jessie, who 
resides in Arkansas. 

Maris Walden was seven years "1,1 when 
he began his education, and he attended the 
firsl school built in the township At this 
time there were only fourteen voters in the 
township and money for the erection of the 
school was raised b) subscription as well 
and timber. The structure was 
the frame building of the time, with slab 
benches, and the onl) hook aside from the 
"speller" our subject possessed was ;1 
end reader. lie had to walk a mile to 
school ami never was able to attend except 
when there was ii" work upon the farm that 
required his attention. 

When but twenty-two years of age he 
enlisted, on Augusl <>. [862, ton, llli- 

5, in Company 1'.. One 1 lunched and Sex • 
enth 111' ilunteer Infantry, under Cap- 

tain Turner, ami the regiment did guard 
duty until June. [863, on the Louisvill 
[Nashville Railroad. After this the) I 
lowed Ah rgan 1 Kentucky and In- 

diana and into Wot Virginia] They then 
went hack to Lexington, Kentucky, the; 
east Tennessee, where our subject was 
placed in the Pi orps. which had to 

open roads and rebuild hi 1 This he 

did until the Knoxville siege, and that win- 
ter he marched up and down east Tennessee 
with scarcely enough to eat. the ran 
being reduced to an ear of corn a day. lie 
was with Sherman until the battle in which 
McPherson was killed, and his regiment 
went hack to Tennessee, where they fought 
against General Johnson, and there thej 
main- of their officers. After this they 
went hack t.. Nashville and Franklin and 
participated in the second day's engage 
ment on December 15 and id under Gen- 
eral Thomas. They then went up the Ohio 



river and on to Washington. The next 
move was into North Carolina, and the 
regiment witnessed in the surrender of 
General Johnston to General Sherman. Mr. 
Walden was honorably discharged at Salis- 
htin . \< irth Carolina, after a li >ng and faith- 
ful service, and mustered oul at Camp But- 
ler, Springfield, Illinois, July to, [865. 

After his war experience our subject re- 
turned home and went to work upon the 
farm, and upon November 8, [866, was 
married to l.avina J. Belt, and she bore him 
three children, namely: Charles 11.. who 
resides in St. Louis, .Missouri; Albert, who 
tesides with his father: Lafayette B., who 
resides in Barnett township and is a farmer. 
Mr. Walden married for a second time Mrs. 
Marj ( I ,aj ton. 

The farm upon which Mr. Walden 
sides is a well-improved piece of property, 
and it is well kept up in ever) respect. In 
he is a Republican, and. although 
he does not seek public preferment, he is 
a man of public spirit and one who occu- 
pies a prominent place in the township in 
which he has made his home for s, 1 many 

years. 

■> « » 

WILLIAM o. ROGERS. 

'The subject of this sketch, who is now 
i in the abstract business, has ], 
a resident of DeWitt county for more than 
forty years, and is numbered among its 
highl) esteemed citizens, lie was born in 
1 11 lisle. Nicholas county, Kentucky. Scp- 
tember <>. 1836, and is a son of John and 
Elenore (Heldreth) Rogers and a grand- 
son of Ezekiel, who was of Irish ancestry. 
John Rogers was a native of Virginia, and 
when a young man took up the study of the 
Bible and became a minister of the Chris- 




JOHN Q. WHITEHEAD. 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



217 



tian church, which calling lie followed until 
his death, which occurred when he w;h 
sixty-seven years of age. His wife, who 
was also a native of that state, died in [838. 
They wore the parents of seven children, as 
follows: Eliza; Jane; David; Ann; John: 
5 rah; and William. During his ministry 
lie answered calls to preach in Illinois, In- 
diana and Virginia, besides those of his na- 
tive state. 

When but a child our subject was ap- 
prenticed to a saddler, which occupation he 
followed for five years, lie then took up 
clerking, but in 1856 came to Clinton, Illi- 
nois, where he stayed but a short time. 

ng later to Logan county, where he tilled 
the -oil for a livelihood. In [858 he re- 
turned to Clinton and acted a- salesman in 
the dard & Hildreth, which 

jition he held for about two years. In 
> he visited his native state, hut a- the 
war was about to break out he returned to 
the north in 1861, and in September of the 
same year enlisted in Company L, Fourth 
Regiment, Illinois Cavalry, under Col. F. 
Lisle Dickey, as a private, hut was soon 
promoted to first sergeant, lie served in 
this capacity for three years and two 
months. Although he was in several heavy 
battles, he was never seriously injured. At 
the E his war career he returned to 

Clinton. Illinois, and a little later engaged 
in farming in Harnett township for one 
year, when he was married and removed to 
Tazewell county, where he carried ..11 farm- 
ing for three years. At the end of that 
time he returned to I'.arnett township and 
opened a general store at Eiallsville, which 
he very successfully carried "ii for sixteen 
years, and for three years under the firm 
of Humphrey & Rogers. For the same 
length of time he .acted as postmaster, being 
the first man appointed to that office in the 



place. At the death of Spuiie Fossett, jus- 
tice of the peace. Mr. Rogers was elected 
to fill the unexpired term. For a number 

.ears he served as school and township 
treasurer, and in 1888 was nominated by 
the Republican party for clerk of the cir- 
cuit court and was elected and re-elected, 
holding the office for twelve consecutive 
lie also engaged in the abstract 
business, which he now carries on, and has 
a full and complete set of abstract I ks. 

Mr. Rogers married Miss Mary A., 
daughter of John Barclay, ^i DeWitt coun- 
ty. This union resulted in the birth of 
three children: Minnie is the wife of \\\ 
A. Prim, of St. Joseph, Missouri; they h 

child. I-' John is following agri- 

cultural pursuits in this county: Maud mar- 
ried C. F. Crum, who is a leading 
of Clinton; they have three children, Lovell, 
1 lelen and Rachel. 

tally Mr. Rogers is a member of the 
A. F. & \. M., chapter, council and com- 
mandery; is member of the Frank 

Lowrey Post, No. 157. < '•. A. R., ••] Clin- 
ton, lie is the owner of a tine property 
in Clinton, and is a pleasant, genial gentle- 
man, who makes many friends, and his life 
l.as ever been such as to win him the con- 
fidence and respect of all with whom he has 
come in contact either in business or social 
life. 



|< )H\ Q. WHITEHEAD. 

John Q. Whitehead is a native of But- 
ler county. Ohio, and was born on June 17. 
1824. He lived at his place of birth until 
he was twenty-live years of age. Mi- early 
education was obtained in the common 
Schools and he assisted his father upon the 
farm. I le wa of I )aniel and Ann 



218 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



(Whitehead) Whitehead, both of whom 
were natives of England. Daniel was a 
shoemaker by trade, and when he settled 
in Ohio, about [820, he located in Butler 
county and engaged in the practice of his 
calling. The father also purchased a farm 

and was \cr\ successful. lie died upon the 
farm, but his wife died in Rush county, In- 
diana, and both died at an advanced age. 
Our subject was one of six children, onl) 
two of whom are now living, and our sub- 
ject was the youngest in the family. 

Aftjer leaving his childhood borne i'.i 
1859, Mr. Whitehead located in Shelby 
county, Indiana, and embarked in the sta- 
tionery business, and continued in same for 
.seme year-.. At the rail of duty. 1 >n Feb 

ruary 9, 1863, he enlisted in Company I. 
One Hundred and Twenty-third Indiana 
Volunteer Infantry, which was assigned i" 
Hoover's division, lie was through the 
Atlanta campaign, then participated in the 
Franklin fight, and his was the first regi- 
ment tn enter Fort Anderson at the sur- 
render. Me was mustered out at Lexit 
ton, North Carolina, and was discharged <>n 
August 23, 1865, having been a brave and 
faithful soldier. 

\fter his war experience he came to Illi- 
ii. 'is and located in Woodford county, near 
Washburn, where he remained three ye 
and then came to DeWitt county and set 
tied in Texas township and rented land and 
engaged in farming and stock-raising for 
smne years. During this time Mr. White- 
head farmed to senile extent in partnership 

with his sun James. About eighteen years 
■■■ he purchased his present farm and has 
resided here ever since, on section [3, Tun- 
bridge township, and is engaged in fruit 

farming. 

Mr. Whitehead married, in Indiana. 
Miss Leath Lightner, and she was a native 



of Pennsylvania, having been horn near 
Harrisburg. She died in Shelby county, 

Indiana, and had home her husband a fam- 
ily of four children, two hoys and two girls, 
three of whom are still surviving, namely: 
Anna Eliza, who married Monroe Young, 
of Rush county, Indiana; James II.; |ohn, 
who died at the age of fort\ six wars and 
left a wife and one child; Emma, who is the 
wife of Franklin Scott, of Bloomington, 
Illinois, and they have four children, viz: 
Muneld, Manic. John and Marie. 

Mr. Whitehead was married a second 
time, and his choice was Marilda Phillips, 
a native ol Indiana. This marriage oc- 
curred on April 1 1. [868, and she was a 
daughter of Isaac and Mary (Wickens) 
Phillips. Both Mr. and Mrs. Phillips wi 
natives of Pennsylvania and came to Indi- 
at a very early day and died in that 
state when both were over eighty years of 
age, after over sixty years of happy mar- 
ried life. These two good people had a 
family of twelve children, seven of whom 

now living. All of the life of Mr. Phil- 
lips was spent in farming, and he was very 
successful, leaving behind him not only a 

g 1 name hut also a comfortable compe- 
tence fi 'i' his family. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Whitehead were horn 
eight children, six of whom are now living, 
namely; Mary, who is the wife of Jacob 
Thompson, a farmer of Tunbridge town- 
ship, and they have one child. Ross; Ella, 
who is the wife of Harry Marshall, of De- 
catur, and they have seven children; George, 
who is in Texas township, a farmer, and 
he married Laura Coppenbarger and they 
have three children. Nettie, Rosy and Edna; 
< >inie. who resides in Rush county, Indi- 
ana: Ralph, who resides in Decatur and 
runs a transfer business, married Ollie 
Thurhcr, a daughter of Isaac Thurber. of 



I HL I'.H H'.RAPHIC \I- RECORD. 



219 



wnship, and Ralph and his wife 
have three children, Gladys, Robert and 
Malvina; Chalmer, who is at home; Nettie 
and Elizabeth died in infant 

Mr. Whitehead is an active member of 
Grand Army of the Republic and has 
been connected with the lodge of ' 
l<.w- for a number of years. He and his 
wife arc members "i" the Baptist church and 
are of the old hard-shelled school. 

When our subject first came to DeWitt 
county the entire locality was wild prairie 
land, upon which the native trees reared 
their rustling heads. No plow had dis- 
turbed the virgin soil and wild game roamed 
unharmed over the rolling prairie-. Up 
and down the streams Indians paddled their 
rude crafts and the clatter of machinery < «r 
the roar of the engine had not been heard 
in the land. Now, through the wonderful 
activity and foresight of its pioneers, De 
Witt county takes front rank among the 
counties of Illinois not only as a fine agri- 
cultural district but also as a commercial 
center, and it has a large population of in- 
telligent, patriotic, thinking men and wo- 
men. many of whom are prominently known 
mnection with the state's best thought 

and action. 

» ■ » 

ALVIS H. LANE, 

Prominent among the wealthy farmers 
and influential citizens of Waynesville town- 
ship is numbered the subject "i' this sketch. 
whose home is on section 25. He was i>. ,rn 
• •n the jd of February, 1840, on the old 
homestead on the same section, and belongs 
very <>ld and highly respected family 
of this county, who took an important part 
in its early development and upbuilding. 
His father, Jesse II Lane, was lx,m in 



Bourbon county, Kentucky, in 181 1, and 
was a son "l Tilmon Lane, who removed 
with his family to DeWitt county, Illini 
in [83O, and entered land on section 25, 
Waynesville township, where he improved 

•.rni. hut was not long permitted to eu- 

his new home, as he died about [833. 

Jesse 11. Lane, our subject's father, 
came with the family to this county and 

-ted his father in opening up the farm 
On the hitter's death he succeeded to thci 
place, and throughout life ulh en- 

ged m agricultural pursuits, becoming 
• lie of the substantial farmers of the coun- 
ty. In early life he married Miss Jane 
Hayes, who came here when a young lady 
and died in i860. His death occurred in 
[877, and both were laid to rest in Rock 
Creek cemetery, where a suitable monu- 
ment has been erected to their memory. 
They were prominent members of the Rock 
t reek Christian church, which Mr. Lane 
assisted in organizing, and of which he was 
;, deacon for many years. He was a s,,ldier 
of -the Black Hawk war and served as road 
commissioner in his township for a time. 

Our subject is the second in order of 
birth in a family of five children, the others 
being: Sarah Ann. wife of Ami . of 

Logan county. Illinois; Margaret J., wife 
of Jacob Coppenberger, of Waynesville, 
DeWitt county; and Lineliiie and James 1 
both deceased. 

Mr. Lane, of this review, grew to man- 
hood upon the home farm, assisting his fa- 
ther in the arduous task of transforming 
the wild land into well-cultivated fields. 
Many a day has he devoted to breaking 
prairie with three yoke of oxen. His edu- 
cation was acquired in the district schools 
:<.iu\ the Clinton high school, \fter reach- 
ing man's estate he was married in this 

county, September 2, i860, to Miss Sarah 



220 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



Jane Bayless, who was horn in Indiana but 
was reared in DeWitt county, [llinois, 
where she died in 1874, leaving two chil- 
dren who are Still living, namely: Malimla, 
now the wife of John Jeffrey, who is living 
in southwestern Missouri; and Jesse II.. 
who is married and resides in Waynesville 
township, this county. On the 6th of I 1 
ruary, 1876, Mr. Lane was again married. 
his second union being with Miss Nancy 
Vinson, a daughter of \. J. Vinson, of 
Clinton, whose sketch appears on another 
page of this volume. She was born, reared 
and educated in this county. There is one 
son by the second marriage, Charles II.. 
win. is ii,.w operating a part of his father's 
farm. lie is married and lias one son 
] low aid. 

After his iirsi marriage Mr. Lane lo- 
cated 'ill the farm where he n<<\\ resides. 
commencing with one hundred acres of 
land, to which he has added from timi 
time until he now owils five hundred and 
fort} acres in one body. This is well tiled 
and fenced and is supplied with all tl 
veniences and ries found upon a 

model farm of the present day. The build- 
ings are in first class condition, and every- 
thing about the place betokens a thrifty 
and painstaking owner who thoroughly •w- 
derstands the vocation he has chosen ; 
life work, lie raises a good grade of stock 
and is accounted one of the most skillful 
farmers of his community. 

.Mr. Lane's first presidential vote was 
cast for General George IV McClellan, and 
he has always been a stanch supporter of 
the Democratic party and its principles, hut 
has never cared for office, lie served, how- 
ever, as road commissioner three years, as 
a member of the school hoard a tew years, 
and as clerk ami president of the district, 
having always taken an active interest in 



educational affairs. He and his family at- 
tend the Christian church, having 'been 
reared in that faith, and he is one of the 
most highly respected and esteemed citi- 
ens of Waynesville township. 



PI I Kk \\ [LSON. 



Peter Wilson, a highly respected citizen 
of section three, Harp township, was born 
( >ci oher 15. 1834, in Perry county, Ohio, and 

son of Thomas and Charlotte (Deffen- 
baugh) Wilson. He is of Scotch Irish de- 
scent on his father's side and German on his 
mother's side. I lis parents were both horn 
in .Maryland, hut were married in Perry 
county, Ohio, at the ages of nineteen and 
is. They lived in ( )hio till 1835 
when, with their children and accompanied 
by his brothers, Edwin and Isaiah Wilson, 
they came by wagons to begin life anew on 
the uncultivated prairies of Illinois, locating 
in what was then Macon county, DeV 
comity not having been formed at that time. 
Here Peter Wilson attended with his broth- 

and sisters the log school house. Sitting 
on its rude wooden benches he learned his 
alphabet and how to join the letters into 
words and then to read sentences by putting 
the words together in the g 1 if slow old- 
fashioned way. ( )n eld winter mornings 
he warmed his numbed fingers by the crack- 
ling log lire in the greal open fireplace, then 
did his '"sums" in arithmetic and learned to 
print and write lie helped his fa- 
ther to cultivate his land, to herd his 
cattle, to cut wood for their lire, to hunt the 
wolves that killed their (locks, to saw lumber 
in his saw mill, to grind the grain their neigh 
bors brought many miles 1. . Thomas Wilsi m's 
grist mill. And while he helped he learned 




PETER WILSON. 




MRS PETER WILSON. 



hi; raphical reo >rd. 






from his father lessons in industry and hon- 
esty and foresight and pereseverance. After 
his father's death he u«<k his share of the 
land, one hundred and thirty acres, and 
moved upon it. He improved it. built a fine 
house ;m«l has lived there ever since, He 
was united in marriage May 21, [868, to 
Miss Frances Holdy Smaller, a daughter of 
John A. and Julia 1 Reckner) Smaller. Mr. 
Smalley was a native of Pennsylvania, and 
Mrs. Smallej of Maryland. They cami 
Harp township in 1862. Here Mr. Smalley 
died in [895 at the ag ■ :ars. 

Mrs. Smalley now lives in Wilson township. 
Mrs. Peter Wilson i- one of eight children 
born t" Mr. and Mrs. Smalley. The otb 
are: John married Ida Nixon and now 
lives in McLean county, Illinois; James D., 
and his wife. Rosa Parker, live in Wilson 
township ; Edmond F. married Lula Higgins 
now reside in Harp township; Emma, who 
i- now the wife of William Bell, lives in 
Wilson township; Isabel married J. A. 
Curl, and their home is in Clinton; Sarah., 
now the wife of William ( >rr. lives in Harp 
township; Effie, who married, William I.its- 
enb - dead. 

Mr. and Mrs. Peter Wilson are the par- 
ents of live children. Their oldest daughter, 
Ida. married William Reiley and lives in 
Harp township. They have two children. 
Helen and Fern. Edmond and hi- wife. 
Laura Povens, and their daughter, Pe; 
live in DeWitt comity. Illinois. Albert J. 
and William Harley are at home with their 
parents. Ollie Emmett died when four years 
1 'f ag 

Mr. Wilson i- a supporter of the Repub- 
lican party but does not seek the honors 
office, lie ha- led a quiet home life and tells 
with satisfaction that he was never drawn 
on a jury. No higher tribute can he paid to 
hi- just and peaceful character than 



that he has never been sited in hi- life. He 
1- a faithful Presbyterian and his wife i- a 
devoted member of the Methodist Episi 

church. He 1- a l; I citi/en. an upright 

man. honored b) all who have the good for- 
tune to know him. 



JERSEY l>. LA TEER. 

Jersej D. La leer is the junior member 
of the firm of Crosby & I. a 'leer, who are 
now successfully engaged in the rea 
loan and lire insurance business in Farmer 
lie i- lint a recent a< 

iv of progressive business men 
in that thriving town, but his ability, enter- 
prise and upright methods have already 
tablished for him an enviable reputation. 
Although he i- >till a young man com- 
paratively his popularity i- established on 
a linn that of his own well-tested 

merit. 

Mr. La leer v\a- horn near Bellflower, 
McLean county. Illinois, Inly [6, [867, and 
i- a -. >n of David A. I.i Teer, now a resident 
of Ford cunty. tin- state. Our subject 
acquire I In- early education in the disl 

hi- boyll 1 home, and later 

ended the Gibson high school. In i> 
he entered the printing office of the Gibson 
City l.nteipri-e. and in less tha 1 thrte years 
worked his way upward to foreman. < hi the 

1 of August, [887, he became connected 
with the Illinois Central Railroad as sta- 
ll. .11 agent at Kumler, Illinois; later he 
wa- clerk in the freight office at Springfield, 
ami subsequent!) wa- station agent 
Chestnut, New Holland, Roberts and 
Farmer Citj S< ering his connection with 
the company, he formed a partner-hip with 
E. L. Crosby, Jul) _•.}. [900, and the) have 



226 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



since engaged in their present business. So 
successful have they been that they are 
now at the head of a large and profitable 
business, which is constantly increasing, 
and now extends n"t only throughout De- 
Witt and adjoining counties, hut in other 
states as well. 

Mr. l.a Teer was married in iSSS to 
Miss Alice Anelia Heller, a daughter of 
Daniel II. Heller, of Piatt county, and to 
them were born two children: a son who 
died in infancy; and II. Lynne. They have 
a nice home, which is centrally located on 
Plum street, and which was purchased of 
.Mi. B. I-'. Garver. 

In politics Mr. l.a leer is a mp >ng Re- 
publican, has served as alderman of the 
city, and is now a member "i the improve- 
ment board. Fraternally he is a member of 
the Knights of Pythias, the Independent 
< irder I I >M Fellows, the blue lodge, No. 
710, F. X A. M.; the Chapter, R. A. M.; 
and the Eastern Star, to which his wife also 
belongs, lie 1- one of the energetic, pro- 
gressive and reliable business men ol 
Farmer 1. ity and is very popular among his 
fellow citizen^. 



WILLIAM C. McMURRY. 

. One of the esteemed residents ,,1" Farmer 
City is William C. McMurry, ex-sheriff of 
DeWitt county and in former years a lead- 
in- and enterprising business man. lie is 
now living a retired life for his faithful -exe- 
cution of his business interests in former 
years brought to him a comfortable com- 
petence, and now he is enjoying a well- 
merited rest. He was horn in Sangamon 
county, nine miles west of Springfield, Illi- 
October _•, [826, a son of William and 



Elizabeth (Clampit) McMurry. The fa- 
ther was horn in Botetourt county. Vir- 
ginia, and at an early day removed to Ken- 
tucks, thence to Sangamon county. Illinois, 
whence he went to Clinton in [849, settling 
on what is now known as the Lewis (amp- 
hell farm, where he successfully followed 
farming, lie was born in 170,:; ami passed 
away in 1875, while his wife, who was born 
in Kentucky, in [801, died in [850. Their 
children wen-: James Logan: Elizabeth: 
Nancy; William C. ; Lewis R., who died in 
[850; Moses ('., who served in the Civil 
war; Samuel I'... who died in the army while 
protecting the Union; Joseph D., of Baxter 
Spring, Kansas; Ann Jane, of Baxter 
Spring, Kansas; Peter A., who was also 
one of the boys in blue during the war of the 
Rebellion; anil five who died in infancy. 
The members of the family now living are 
William ('.. Moses *'., Joseph 1).. Ann J. 
and Peter A. After the death of his first 
wife the father married Mrs. Agnes Bry- 
ant, hut they had no children. In politics 
lie was fust a Whig and later became a 
stanch Republican. Of the Methodist 
Episcopal church he was an earnest and con- 
sistent member, living an exemplary Chris- 
tian life. 

Mr. McMurry. of this review, spent his 
childhood in Sangamon county, and in 1S47 
took up his abode in Clinton, where, in con- 
nection witli Joel Hall and T. S. Smith, he 
built a mill, operating the first circular saw- 
mill in the county. A year later this was 
removed to I'.arnelt township, where they 

engaged in tin- manufacture of lumber. 
Subsequently Mr. McMurry returned to 
Clinton and erected a mill near the site of 
the present flouring mills. This was con- 
ducted for s, ,me years hy McMurry and 
Daniel Newcomb. Afterward Mr. Mc- 
Murry turned his attention to blacksmith- 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 






ing. learning the trade under the direction 
of Mr. Maxon. Subsequently he carried on 
that business alone. In 1851 he rem. 

the town of DeWitt, where he condui 
smithy until the fall oi hen he - 

after which he operated the Mori 
- : creek mill. In 1856 he settled in Mt. 
-ant. now Farmer City. 

the 4th of September, I Mr. 
McMurry mam ilty to his 

country by enlisting as a memb m- 

pany 1. Thirty-ninth Illinois Infantry, with 
which he served for three nd five 

nths. He was captured at Drur 
Bluff, Virginia, and was incarcerated at 
Libby Prison. Andersonville and Florence, 
being one of the few who survived long im- 
prisonment in those loathsome places, where 

ry hard-hip was endured. He v. 
thin when at last r^ ind hail a rack- 

cough, so that his friends feared for his 
life, hut to-day appears to be a splend'd 
specimen of physical manhood and in ap- 
pearance resembles a man of not more than 
sixty-rive ye 

As soon as his health permitted Mr. Mc- 
Murry resumed work at his trade, and was 
thus employed when, in 1866, he 
elected 'on the Republican ticket to the office 

-heriff of DeWitt county. On his re- 
tirement from the county office he 
in Parmer City, and was there made city 
marshal. In 1S77 he was appointed post- 
master, and served until one year after the 
incoming of the Cleveland, administration. 
He ha- a!-. Keen notary public and justice 
• f the peace, hut he ha- retired from office 

be entered i' — with the confidence and 
1 will of the public He i- now enjoy- 
ing a well-earned rest, ami is a man of up- 
right character, who. in the evening of life. 
1- held in the highe-t resect by reason of 
terling character. 



Mr. McMurry has been twice mat 
in ie wedded Jane Cumm g 

fjhtei I the Re\ . P; the 

»1 regular minister in \ n- 

ship, and who had strong influence in the 

moral development of the community at an 

early day. Mrs. McMurry died in 1 

hildren were: Will- 
iam, who died in inl dwin, d< 
Ann Eliza, the widow of I. P. Jackson, by 
whom she had two children, Eugene C. and 
I. lame.-; Ida Gertrude, who mar; 
Tlioma- Cheney and I n children. 
William. Edwin. Ida Gertrude, Edna, Lew- 

Vlartha and Thomas; Martha Ague-, the 
widow of Prank Gay, by whom -he had one 
child. Murry P.: and James M.. who mar- 
ried Fannie McCart and ha- five children, 
Julia. Richard, J. Willi-. Francis and Harry 
Pee. For his second wife Mr. McMurry 
chose Mrs. Lucinda E. dimming, the 
widow of lame- dimming and a daugh- 
ter of Jame- Washington McCord. The 
children of the second marriage are I. 
Eliah and Ruth, hut the latter is now de- 
The former married Edwin Coll- 
ver and has three children. William P.. 1 >• -r- 
othy and Murry < i. 

Through long year- Mr. McMurry has 
been a representative member of the Ma- 
sonic fraternity. He belonged to the old 
lodge. No. 224, of Parmer City, and served 
ft r four term- a- it- master. When the 
r.ew lodge was instituted, in 1857, he he- 
came one of it- charter members ami its 
first master, and in that capacity he 
for -everal term-, lie was 
tnrer of the district, and ha- been n 
earnest and active in promoting the cause 
Masonry. He also belongs to the chapter. 
He likewise holds membership with the 

nd Army of the Republic, and beloi 
to the Methodist Episcopal church, in which 



228 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



he has served as steward and class leader 
several times. He has ever been faithful to 
the trusts reposed in him, loyal to his duties 
of citizenship and true to his responsibili- 
ties m every relation of life, arid his ex- 
ample is well worthy of emulation. 



NEWTON BRITTIN. 

Among the representative men of V 
township, PeW'itt county, Illinois, is 
Newton Brittin, on - - was 

born, reared and has always lived in this 
locality. He is a son of Henry and Almira 
(Crippin ) Brittin, and Henry Brittin is a 
native of McLean county, Illinois, to which 
count v his father came in the year of the 
big snow. Henry Brittin now resides in 
LeRoy to which localit) he removed aboul 
nine years ago and now lives retired from 
e business. 

Newton Brittin has spent hi- life upon 
the farm, receiving a good education in the 
the township during the winter 
months, and working upon the farm in the 
summer. When lie became twenty-one he 
began to work for himself and now owns 
and operates a tine farm of one hundred 
and sixty acres, lie carrying on general 
farming and stock-raising. His buildings 
.ire in excellent condition and his house is 
verj comfortable, while he never neglects 
any part '<i his land, keeping it all in 

d shape. 

In [893 .Mr. Brittin was married 
Mis. Belle Silvy, a native of this Mate, and 
to them have been horn the following chil- 
dren: Jennie Irene: Henry; l.etta and 
Lyle. 

Mr. Brittin is a Democrat in politics 
and the first office he held was that of asses- 



sor, which he retained for one year. Tn 
1900 he ran for supervisor of Wilson town- 
ship on the People's ticket, and it was a 
very close election, he being defeated by a 
majorit) of one vote. At the follow ins; elec- 
tion lie was elected by the same majority 
and still holds his position upon the board. 

alizing that he understands the state of 
the roads and bridges in his and surround- 
ing townships, the other members o| the 
hoard placed him upon the committee on 
roads and bridges and also on the one on 
printing and stationery, which he -nil re- 
tains. Mr. Brittin is a man of solid -.'oil 
sense and is well qualified to repr ;en1 the 
interests of his township for he is a man ol 

rling honesty and uprightness of purpose 
and by his many excellent qualities has 
made mam warm friends. 



ALBERT (i. WILLI WIS. 

Among the men who have taken an act- 
ive part in the development of the state 
Illinois, one of the oldest in DeWitt county 
is the venerable and highly honored Albert 

< 1. Williams, who was ninety years of age 
upon his last birthday and is still hale and 
well, showing forth in his life the result of 
upright living and honest dealings. He now 
resides in Clinton, DeWitt county. Illinois, 
hut was horn in Fairfax county. Virginia, 

i Washington, March 24, 1S11. 

His father was James Williams, and he 
as well a- the ancestors of the Williams 
family as far hack as any trace of them can 
he found, was a native of Virginia. In this 
good old state he married Nancy \dams. 
also horn in Virginia, hut later the parents 
removed to Kentucky and the father died 
in Shelby county, that state, when about 



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THE I'.H (GRAPHICAL RECORD. 






rid was buried tl his 

wife, but >he lived t. ■ be seventy six y< 

The father was 
in the war of 1812 but 9 
means and exerted his infiu the ut- 

most to advance the g 1 cause. 1: 

••.inch Democrat. < >f the - 

children born to these g 1 • 

are now living - i farm- 

er of Bowling Green, Kentucky, who 

: Anna, the widow 
I [enry Storts, now i in Clint 

Mir is ged ninety-three years, who lias 
f her faculties in a remarkable 
Allien i 
Albert G. Williams received his educa- 
tion in a subscripts - •! in his native 
state, and tells entertaining of the 

litt'< g s - slab bene 

and crude appliances, in which however the 
pupils were well grounded in the princi] 

learning. At an early ag itered a 

wholesale ^r. eery h< >use at Alexandria. Vir- 
- - it as lie had earned 
sufficient money he again atter. 
and when twenty or twenty-one tar. 
This line he continued for ei 

teaching in varii rict 

the winter montl 
About 1832 he married Mi-s Anna Mur- 
phy at Bowling Green, Kentucky, and 
this uni 1 three children : Anna. 

married Willis Reed and resides in Kans 
She is the mother of nine children, viz.: 
Charles, who married and lives in McLean 
inty, Illinois, and has three children: 
Lula. who married Ruel Dennan and they 
live in Oklahoma and have "lie child: Jar 
who married and lives in I VAVitt county, 
Illinois, and has two children: Frank, who 
lives in Harp township: Harry. I 
Robert, Florence and Hazel, all of whom live 
in Kansas with their mother. Nancy, tl 



child of "iir subject, married Elijah 
ind thej have two childrei 

ip and 
children, Nancy and Clareno 
k; Albert, who married and li 

I has t\\" children, 
Kuth and Balman. the third child 

iur subj< 

nil. 
Mr. Williai married for the 

Sarah B< 
and to this union was born one child, vi 
ih. who died and is buried at Wei. Ion, 
Mr>. Williams died and is bur;. 
in the old cemetery at Clinton, Illinois 
Februar $83, Mr. Williams married 

Mrs. PI r, a native of Ne 

k. who came to Illinois in [857. No 
children have been born to this ui 

After ' »e Mr. Willi 

imenced farming in Illinois near 
bun;, and after eight or nine year- he re- 
moved to Creek township, DeWitt county. 

• 5 5 purchas hundro 

of wild land. From time to time 

this imnien- rv- 

iiis own use one tion in s< 

. twenty-four. This land has all been 
put into a tine - cultivation and the 

comfortable hous lands up irm 

erected by him. Part of the property 
is now farmed by 1 ind the 

remainder is rent. Mr. Willi.- 

retired from active life in [883 and r< 
to the . linton. Here he and his 

timable wife reside in a house which • 

:ed by her ami it has t> tly im- 

proved and enlarged until it is one of the 
most homelike houses in Clinton, and i- 
ed upon South Jackson avenue, corner 
Adam- 
Mr. Williams is a strong Democrat and 
r Andrew Jackson, ami 



232 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



Erom that time till the present he lias never 
missed voting for the Democratic candidate _, 
for president. For a number of years he 
served his party and fellow townsmen upon 
the school board and has always taken a 
deep and active interest in township affairs, 
and although he has attained to the unusual 
age of four score years and ten, he is -till 
an important factor in political matters. 
Both he and Mrs. Williams are consistent 
members of the Presbyterian church, to 
which they are liberal supporters. Through- 
out the entire community Mr. Williams is 
universally respected and beloved Eor his 
public spirit and his high moral character, 
while the people of Clinton are proud oi 
his energj and the fact that he is in posses 
n of his faculties, and is able to read 
without glasses at so advanced an age. 



J. GUERNSEY POR1 ER, M. D. 

This prominent and successful physi- 
cian and surgeon of Clinton was born iu 

iton, July i-'. [868, and is descended 
from an old substantial family, who have 
In .rue an important part in the history of 
this country. His grandfather, George 
Porter, was born in Pennsylvania, but when 
a child was taken to Ohio, where he grew 
to manhood and followed the pursuits ol 
a farmer. He there married Miss Kliza 
Lee Lowe, daughter of John W. Lowe and 
a second cousin to Robert L. Lee. They 
reared a family of three children. as follows: 
Edward, our subject's father; John \\\. of 
Clinton; and L. Josephine, who married 
Isaac X. Tully, a physician of Red (loud, 
Nebraska. In [852, George Porter came 
with his sons to DeWitt county, Illinois, 



where he purchased a farm in Harnett 
township, where he spent his remaining 
days, dying in [859 at the age of fifty-six 
_\ ears. ] li-, wife attained the age 1 if se\ enty. 
Ills son |bhn, who is now retired in Clin- 
ton, served from t86i to [865 in Company 
E, Twentieth Illinois Volunteer Infantry, 
and was promoted to second lieutenant. 

Edward Porter was born in Sinking 
Springs, Highland county. Ohio, on Feb- 
ruary i<. 1833, where he spent his boyhood 
days and attended the common schools, and, 
as before stated, in [852 came with his 
parents to DeWitt county. He was an in- 
dustrious lad and eager to obtain a good 

education, and aside front his regular 

scl ling he sought the knowledge of 

authors, spending all his leisure time in 
reading the best literature, which was bene- 
ficial to him in his future profession. At 
seventeen years of age he began teaching, 
often having pupils older than himself. In 
[85] he began the stud) of medicine, which 
he kept up for several years, devoting what 
time he could spare to it. In [862 he 
proved his patriotism h\ enlisting in the 
One Hundred and Seventh Regiment, 
Illinois Volunteer Infantry. in which 
he faithfully served for two years 
and was then discharged for physi- 
cal disability. In [864 he was nomi- 
nated by the Republican party for county 
treasurer and was elected by a large ma- 
jority, which office he filled with so much 
credit to himself that he was re-elected in 
1 St .(.. The next two years were spent on 
the farm, after which he attended a course 
of medical lectures in Philadelphia, Penn- 
sylvania, in the Homeopathic College, from 
which he graduated with honors. He 
then returned to Clinton and bought Dr. 
Mitchell's practice, but this was not neces- 
sary, for almost immediately his skill was 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 






rec s and he \\:l> acknowledg 

one of the leading physicians of the county. 
He was a great reader, spendii . arc 

moments in the study of able writ 
scientious practitioner, a noted writer and 
an eloquent speaker, believing firmly in the 
teachings of Swedenl June 

1856, he was united in marriage with Lucy 
E. Mills, whose father was one of the early 

ers of DeVVitt county. Their children 
were Chancey II.. of Lincoln, Mini 
George !'•.. of South Dakota; Mr- - 
H. Wilson, county superintendent of 
schools el" Clinton. Illinois; Mrs. Lucy E. 
Turner, of Lincoln. Illinois; J. Guerns 
our subject; <iile> G., a physician of War- 
ren. Arkansas; Mr-. Lliza J. Gatchell, 
Mrs. Nellie E. Owen: and Freddie A., a 
teacher of Gin ton. The father <>i this fam- 
ily died March 1. 1879. He was a member 
the A. F. & A. M. Lodge. His widow, 
who survives, has a beautiful brick resi- 
dence, where our subject also make- his 
home. 

In the spring of 1888 J. Guernsey Por- 
ter graduatet 1 from the Clinton high school 
and was then associated with the American 
Ex] impany, of Springfield, Illinois, 

but was later promoted to messenger and 
served in that capacity until 1895. Having 
devoted a good deal of time to the study 
of medicine, he entered the Chicago Homeo- 
pathic Medical College and graduated in 
nee came to Clinton, where 
he ha- already built up a lucrative practice 
ami i- l'a-t reaching the degree his father 
held in the science of medicine. He 
member of DeWitl V F. & A. M.. 

dkrake Chapter and Clinton Council, 
all of Clinton. He is als,, a member and 
examining physician of the Modern Wood- 
men. Foresters, Court of Honor, A. t >. C. 
W.. and Loyal Sons of America. 



ANDREW J WkSi ».\ DAVIS. 

And rev 

• lent of - was born m 

Madison county. September 8, 1851, and is 

of \\ illiara and Ruth 
\ is. lx .th of whom are now <1< 
father was a native of Tennessee and the 
mother of the Blue I this 

worthy couple were born nine children, our 
subje the fourth in birth. The other 

six living an 1". J. D 

William Harrison Davis, John W< 
Amanda Ann. Louis Richard, and Thomas 
Washington. 

Andrew Davis received his education 
from the schools in Hmingham coUnty and 
remained upon the home farm until he was 
nineteen year ge, at which time lie 

rented a tract of land and started 01 

journey for him- I In August 11, 

he was united in marriage with Miss 
Sarah Ann Wilson, daughter of Philip 
Margaret Wilson, both of whom hav( 
partetl this life. Mr. Wilson was a native 
of Pennsylvania and Mrs. Wilson of Ohio, 
in which state Miss Sarah was Inirn. 

Mr. and Mrs. Davis became the parents 
of rive children, as follows: Emma R 
who became the wife of Ezra Westlake, 
now resides m Logan count v. Their chil- 
dren are Irvin. Ruth ami Ruby, twins; and 
Pearl. Amy Estella married George Young, 
and r< 1 the home township. 

iiildren. I Ralph ami 

Earl. Cora is the wife of James Reed, and 
they are the parents .if two daughters, Ha- 
zel and Pansy. Pearl and Bessie, the young- 
est children, are at home with their parents. 

In [888 Mr. Davis moved t" DeWitl 
county ami continued in the agricultural 
pursuits until iS<)4. when he open 
era! store at Birkbeck, his being the only 



!34 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



store in that place for about five years. In 
[896 our subject was appointed postmaster 
of Birkbeck, under President Cleveland, 
and although a stanch Democrat he has 
given such satisfaction that he has held the 
office through the Republican administra 
tion to the present tunc. For two terms he 
was township clerk and has also served as 
tool director. Religiously, Mr. Davis is 
a member of the Christian church of Char- 
ter I lak. 



EZEKI1 1 G. F. II PRISON. 

After years of active labor, devoted 
principally to farming and stock-rais- 
ing, llr. Harrison is now living a 
retired life in Clinton, having a nice 
home at No. 719 North (.'enter street. 
A native ol Illinois, he was born in Sanga- 
mon county, "ii the 1 ith of November, 1828. 
His father. Ezekiel I'.. Harrison, was born 
in Rockingham county, Virginia, and traced 
his ancestr) hack to Benjamin Harris, .11. 
the father of William 11. Harrison, ex-pi 
ident of the United States. When a boy 
the father of our Subject went to Kentucky. 

where he grew to inanh 1 and was united 

in marriage with Miss Anna James Bell, 
who was also a native of the 1 >Id Dominion. 
About [822 he came to Illinois and settled 
in Sangamon county, where he bought and 
improved a farm, making his home then 
until [848, when he removed to Petersburg, 
Illinois. There he died at the age of sixty- 
seven, llis wife, who passed away some 
years previous, was about fifty years of age 
at the time of her death. Both were active 
and faithful members of the Methodist 
Episcopal church, with which he united at 
the age of twelve years, afterward becom- 
ing a local preacher of that denomination. 



In politics he was a Whig, lie had eleven 
children, of win 'in two died in infancy, but 
only three are now living, namely: Milton 
I'... a resident of Petersburg, Menard coun- 
ty, Illinois; Lucinda Priscilla, wife of Enoch 
McGrady, of Belleville, Republic county, 
Kansas; and Ezekiel, our subject. 

\h. I [arrison, of this review, was reared 
and educated in Menard county, attending 
first the subscription schools and later the 
district schools, lie was graduated at the 
Petersburg high school, and then commenced 
teaching in the district schools, following 
that pursuit, together with clerking, for 

•it ten years. For a time he carried on a 
general store of his own at Petersburg. In 
1861 he came to DeWitt county and pur- 
chased eighty acres of partially improved 
land in Barnett township, and 011 selli 
that propert) bought a trad of one hundred 
and twentj acres in the same township. 
Subsequent!) he disposed of that property 
and removed to Wilson township, where he 
bought one hundred and sixt) acres of land. 
To this he later added another tract of one 

hundred ami sixty acres, making a g 1 

farm of three hundred and twenty acres of 
well-developed land. Mr. Harrison n 
many improvements upon this place and suc- 
cessfully engaged in its cultivation, ami also 
made a specialt) of the raisii te stock 

until [891, when he rented the farm ami re- 
moved to Clinton, where he owns an impos- 
ing home. I [ere, surrounded by all the com- 
forts of life, he i> U"\\ living retired, enjoy - 

a well-earned rest. 

In 1857 Mr. Harrison married Miss Em- 
ily Jane Carman, a native of this state, and 
a daughter of Charles L. and Arenia (Per- 
kins) Carman. Her father was born in 
New York state. Our subject and his wife 
are the parents of ten children, namely: ( 1) 
William died in infancy; (2) Charles, 




E. G. F. HARRISON 



THI IRAPHICAL RECORD. 



wh in llit- furniture - m 

Clinton as a member of the firm of Lemon 

. married Laura Barnett, and 

e child, Edith Kohim ink 

1 5 ind 

is • in importing hou 

Edwin !.. a resident 
Illinois, married Sarah B d they 1 

had four children, two of whom died in in- 
fancy, the others are Wilbur and Heli 
All>ert. died in infancy: :. a 

Xorm 
Burwell and 
tor Marie. Ven Elbert Iredell, and 

an infant : (7) Lilly May is the v - ler- 

nian Grant Hul' linton, they 

have one child. Cecile; (Si Minnie 1 
in infancy; (9) Ruby Tune is the wife 

\V. Edward nton, who is in 

the em; the Illinois Central Railr 

mpany; irence Lucile 1- at home 

with her pari 

Mr. H career has ' up- 

and he has I 
•ice and ill who know him. 

His wif membership in the M 

al church, and the family receive 
and merit the hnj 1 of the entire com- 

munity. 



WILLIAM METZGER. 

Williaiti M 1 retired citizen of 

Clinton, Ulini itive of Pennsyl- 

vania, born in Bedford county. February 

ind Mary 
Ann 1 Wort/ 1 Metzger. The father of our 
suliji man that was actively iden- 

tified with the county in which he 
and . t the time of 

death, which occurred when he was 
alx>ut thirty The mother 

11 



ir chil- 
Audrew J.; 
-i.ih. and William. 

William Mi un- 

til he 

ermined to mak in the 

rid. 1 le li- 

ft time. 
In 1846 he re 1 >e- 

Witt county, and tl lent 

tnd harness-ma- 
ker. 1 1 by Mr I. Jack- 
W. P. Hunt, and in lE 

In dr. Mel 

of the f the ti 

was ,1c me on h 

in demand, -• unknown 

and lid ride in any direction. Il ( 

mmon tl i if 

nick trip made tl 

other way but I 

ry different from what 
they are at the present time. 
were short with small I at the 

end. to lengthen or shorten >uld 

require. 

Machim ere unki 

that everything must be made by hand, 

■in the ■ 
ti\e cattle. ned at the near l>v vil- 

lle continued there until 1865, whi 
he - le to Clinton, where he 

continued in the same bl • :r- 

chased the inter. I le c 

ried on a ver\ successful business until 

hen he -old out. At the end 
this time, at the request of his many friend-. 

the I >e\\ nty 

National Bank, which position he tilled for 
<• time with credit to himself ami 



238 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



the entire satisfaction of the patrons of the 
institution. From the time of the organ- 
ization of the bank he lias been a director 
and in \X')4 he was made vice-president. 
which position he still holds. 

By marriage Mr. Metzger was united 
with Miss Rachel, daughter of William 
Cantrall, who came to DeWitt county in 
the fall of 1835 and took Up a tract of land 
and made farming his life occupation, al- 
though he was engaged in stock-raising 
and dairying to a large extent. He died 
on the home farm at the age of seventy-six 
years, and his wife at the age of sixty-four. 
She ua> a Miss Mary McClure and a native 
of Virginia. This couple became the par 
ents of the following named children: 
Henry: Rachel; Margaret; and William 
II.. who resides on the old homestead in 
tin- county. 1" our subject and his wile 
have been born the following named chil- 
dren: Minnie, who died at the age of eight 
years, ami Henry M.. who i> largely intet 
ested in the cold storage business at Grand 
Rapids, Michigan, lie married Mi-- Kattie 
Beaumont. 

In [865, when Mr. Metzger located in 
Clinton, the town was in it- infancy and 
contained but a few hundred souls. Willi 
the thought that it was sure to become a 
thriving little city. Mr. Mel get purchased 
five acre- of land northwest of the public 
square, which he divided off into town lot-. 
Since then he ha- disposed of most of it and 
i,. daj it i- "ne of the best resident portions 
of Clinton. His own commodious residence 
stand- on a portion of the original purchase. 

Socially Mr. Metzger i- a charter mem- 
ber of the Knights of Pythias, and since 
the first meeting has always been present 
unless he was obliged to remain at home 
on account of illness. Since the organiza- 
tion of the Republican party he ha- been a 



stanch supporter of its principles and in 
former years took an active interest in polit- 
ical affairs. From the very first he has 
taken an active interest in the welfare and 
prosperity of his adopted city and has at 
all tunc- been found ready and willing to 
do all in his power to further its interests, 
and now that he has reached old age he 
can look back and see that his effort- were 
ni >t in vain. Such live- arc worthv of emu- 
latii mi. 



ALLEN A. TURNER. 

Allen A. Turner, one of tin- leading ag- 
riculturists and prominent citizens of Rut- 
ledge township, was born March .18, 1853, 

on the farm in that town-hip where his 
father, lienui- Turner, >till lives. A sketch 
of the latter will be found on another page 
of tin- volume. Our subject grew to man- 
h 1 upon the home farm and gave his fa- 
ther the benefit of hi- labor-, until twenty- 
two years of age, when he boughl the John 
Andrew farm of one hundred and forty 
acre- in Rutledge town-hip. The place was 
under cultivation, but there were no build- 
ings thereon, lie set out shade and fruit 
tree-, erected a nice residence and two large 
barn-. In connection with the cultivation 
of hi- land he is quite extensivelj engaged 
in the raising of stock, making a specialty 
of cattle and sheep, of which he has a flock 
of two hundred, lli- farm i- made to yield 
a golden tribute to the care and labor be- 
stowed upon it. and he has raised a- high 
as seventy bushels of corn per acre and 
sixty bushels of oat-. 

On the 22d of February, 1876, Mr. 
Turner was united in marriage with Miss 
Rebecca J. Lappin, who was also born in 
Rutledge township, June uj, 1854, a daugh- 



Till". l;i()C,k.\rHK"AL RECORD. 



239 



ter of William and Catherine (Johnson) 
Lappin. Her grandfather, James Lappin, 
who was a native of ' )hio, came to DeWitt 
county late in life and died here when 
seventy years of age, his remains being in- 
terred in the LeRoy cemetery. Ili> children 
were William. Samuel. Rebecca, Sally, 
Isaac, John and James. William Lappin, 
Mr-. Turner's father, was horn in Mad is 
county. Ohio, and on coming to De- 
W'itt county. Illinois, purchased the Van 
Deventer farm in Rutledge township, and 
carried it on until his death, which occurred 
March 26, [880, when he was fifty-eight 
yea- ge. His wife long survived him. 

dying July 8, 1901. at the age of seventy- 
two. In their family were nine children, 
namely: Louisa, wife of J. W. Walte 
Phebe, wife of E. Gilmore; Samuel: Re- 
becca J., wife of our subject; Sarah, de- 
ceased; Mary, wife of J. Lash: l.ydia. wife 
I . Vndrews; Laura: and Olive, wife of 
A. L. Fuller. Unto Mr. ami Mrs. Turner 
were l*>rn seven children, as follows: Min- 
nie, who married F. 1'.. Stiver-, of Web- 
City, Iowa, and has one child. Arlie: 
Nellie R.; Estella M.: Mary Elsie; Charles 
W\. who died in infancy: Freddie H.; and 
n. who died in infancy. 
By his ballot Mr. Turner supports the 
men and measures of the Democratic party, 
and his fellow citizens have called upon 
him to serve a- highway commissioner 
twelve consecutive year-, and school tr< 
urer twenty-two years, and he -till hold- 'he 
latter office. He takes quite an active in- 
terest in civic societies, and i- a prominent 
member of a number of orders, including 
the Masonic fraternity, the Knight- of 
Pythias, the Modern Woodmen of America, 
and the Loyal Son- of America. He joined 
Anion Lodge, No. 261, A. 1-'. & A. M.. of 
DeWitt. January 26, [883. He 1- lilK-ral 



in his religious views, while his wife 1- a 
member of the Methodist Episcopal church. 
He i> a man of recognized ability and sterl- 
ing worth, and the success he ha- achieved 
is justly merited. 



-IJ'H R. GRADY. 

- distinct a pioneer of Illinois i- Mr. 
Grady that he vividly recalls when Macon 
and DeWitt counties were wild and uncul- 
tivated, and when but lew had emigrated 
here and availed themselves of the latent 
fertility. During the long year- of his 
wisely directed life he has played an im- 
portant part in developing the locality of 
which he is now a resident, though at pres- 
ent retired from the active work of tilling 
and gathering harvests. A native of 
Pennsylvania, he was born near Hunting- 
don. Huntingdon county. March _\ iSjj, 
and lived at the place of his birth and in 
the western part of the state until 1856. 
Hi- parents. Hiram and Elizabeth t Work) 
Grady, were horn in Pennsylvania, the lat- 
ter, in Lancaster county, where he eng 
in fanning for many year-, later remov- 
ing to Huntingdon county, where his 
death occurred at the age of seventy- 
two years, his wife having pre-deceased 
him in 1866. Into the family were horn 
nine children, three of whom are living, 
and of these Joseph i- oldest. 

In the early subscription and later pub- 
lic schools Mr. Grady received hi- educa- 
tion, and until twenty-four year- of age 
lived at home and assisted hi- father with 
the farm work. In the western part of the 
State he rented a farm which he managed 
successfully for several years, ami after- 
wards worked at day laln.r for some time. 



240 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



Upon coming to Illinois he located first 
near Clinton, in Texas township, DeWitt 
county, but after a short time removed to 
Logan county and later to Warren county, 
where he remained for a year, but eventu- 
ally returned to DeWitt county. lie then 
purchased eighty acres of land in Texas 
township from the Illinois Central Kail- 
road Company, which he cleared up 
and upon which he erected a small hoi 
and prepared to cultivate In- land. Here 
lie lived for about forty years, and is still 
the owner of the property, which is now- 
fanned by his youngest son. This la 
was added 1' 1 fp 'in time to lime until il 
sumed the large proportions oi four hun- 
dred acres, all of which is now divided 
among his children. While occupying his 
farm he engaged in general farming and 
stock-raising, and was successful beyond 
his expectations, ["hough a 

I )un> icr.it 111 polil ics and a worker fi >r 1 
nicipal puritj . he n< 1 ed for political 

office, though he held the office of ward 
commissioner for two terms and school 
director for several terms. Fraternally In 
an Odd Fellow, having joined that organ- 
ization thirty years ago, ami 1- now a mem- 
ber 1 if Mar. >a 1 .odge, N T o. ,^14. 

In Huntingdon county, Pennsylvania, 
Mr. Gi irried, February 24, [857, 

with Isabella Jane McCartney, a native of 
Huntington county, Pennsylvania, and 
daughter of John and Isabella McCartney, 
a farmer in the state of William l'enn. 
To Mr. and Mrs. Grady have been horn 
seven children, four of whom are living. 
Tryphena Grady was horn on the home 
place in Texas township, became the wife 
of George I . Farran, a farmer of Friend's 
Creek, Macon county, and died, leaving 
seven children, seven years ago. The chil- 
dren are:. Allie. Ida. Joseph. Jennie. 



Vfaude, Grace, and Viola. Hiram Grady 
is one oi the substantial fanners of Texas 
township, and has a comfortable home on 
his farm of two hundred and seventy- 
nine acres on sections 26 and 36. lie 
is prominent in the affairs of the coun-s 
tv. and is ;it present serving as a member 
of tin' school hoard. Mrs. Hiram Grady 
was formerly Agnes Mayall. and she is the 
mother of four children. Hubert, Pearl, 
Hazel, and Mary. Samuel Gradj died at 
about the age of nine years; he was born in 
the home place in Texas township, [da M., 
1- the wile of Robert M. Mayall, who lias a 
farm of eighty acres on section 26, d'exas 
township, comprising a portion oi the 
Gradj property. In the family there are 
four children, Mabel, Homer. .Leo and 
Mane. Geneva is the wife of \. |. Shoe 
maker, who works a farm .'I one hundred 
and twenty acres in (feck township, forty 
acres of which he owns, and the balance 
beli »ng • ti 1 his father in law. The} hi 
two children, John and Emma. Emma 
dy died at the In ime place al the age i >i 
seven years. Lewis lives on eight} ai 

of the home place, married l.ydia Bennett, 

daughter of Henrj Bennett, a prominent 
and wealthy farmer of Creek township, 
and ur children, Francis, Opal, Her- 

s.all. and Lucy. All of the children were 
horn on the home place, and were educated 
in the public S< hi k lis 



Jl IHN W. IK HJGHAM. 

John W. Hougham, a well known agri- 
culturist residing on section 36, Waynes- 
ville township, is a native of DeWitt coun- 
ty, his birth having occurred in W'apclla 
township, on the 15th of November, [855. 



Till iRAPHICAL RECORD. 



M' 



His parent- were John and Sainain 

kins. 11 i 1 [ougham, this 

inty, where tlieir marri § 
brated. The father died b :rth 

• air subject. The mother resides in \\ 
tvnship. She was a nati *hio 

John Atkinson, one 
the pioneers of this county. 

The subject of t': w remained 

with his mother until about grown, and 
was educated in the commoi De- 

Witt count) . ! 

irm by the month, and then wenl 
ifornia, carrying "ii a ranch in S 
mento county f 

lie returned to Illim t a farm in 

Wapella township, which he operal 
-. but in 1894 he - 'Id th; 
purchased his present tan ghty 

acres . >, Waynesville township, 

lie further improvement ami cultivation 
which he has since devoted his i 
with ii tifying results. He has re- 

modeled the residence, erect* 

il fruit, and made many 

other useful and valuable improvements. 

After he had been in' California three 

irs Mr. : . i returned to hi- n.v 

inty, where he was married on the 25th 

April. 1878, t< > Mi— Mary Jane Scott* 

who rn in Knox county, Missouri, in 

Her father. W. I.. Scott, a native 
To lHiii"is when a -:i 

. ami hi t" manhood and mar- 

Drusilla Cox, a native of Mis- 
ri. He subsequentlj removed to Knox 
• itej hut i- now living in 
Adair county, Missouri. 

In political sentiment Mr. Hougham is 
a Republican, and on national issues ah 
supports that party, hut at local 1 he 

tes for the men whom he believes 



qualified t>> till \'. 

■ 
high* 1 has been a member of the 

.md a d iunty 

: hi- part) . hi- trus- 

'ii \\ aynes\ ille town- 
ship. R< a member of the 
•nan church, cially 
1- a member 

Waynesville, with which he united in 
rably known tin. 
out the county where almost his entire life 
and he -tand- high in the 
m of hi- fellow 



I' >H.\ 



PHARES. 



er half a century th 
h has 1 < f ] >e\Vitt 

county, ami for many y< lively 

identified w ith the 

ton, but i- now practically living an 
life. He n of the late Satin 

I'hares. a nati incinnati, ml a 

sou of Robert and Amy (Clevii 
I'hares. who removed from Virginia to 
Ohio. In [847 the father of ou 
came to DeW'itt county. Illinois, and. 
spendi n a rented farm 

Waynesville, he located in Clinton, where 
, • <1 in the butcher business, his; 
-hop being on the present site of 
Harris' -tore, on the southwest con;. 
He carried on that bus 
For about five years. Having in earl) life 
studied and practiced veterinary surgery, he 
then turned his attention to that pi 
and in its practice he here met with excel- 
lent success, his ding 
throughout this and adjoining 



242 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



During the Civil war lie served in the Sixty- 
eighth Illinois Volunteer Infantry, and af- 
terward drew a pension. He died in 1900. 
at the advanced age of ninety-three years. 
His wife, who bore the maiden name of 
Sarah Marshall, passed away in 1 S 7 7 . 
They were the parents of thirteen children. 
namely: William and Robertj twins; Eliza- 
beth; John A.: Henry C. : Francis M.: 
Elizabeth; Malissa J.: Julia and Marjorie, 
twins: Mary I-"..; and Samuel. AH are liv- 
ing with the exception of Robert and Ma- 
liss.i J. 

h>hn A. 1 'hares was born in Xenia. 
Greene county, < >hio, June 2, [832, and was 
fifteen years of age when he came with his 
parents to this county, lie spent his early 
life upon a farm, and in [850 came to Clin- 
ton to learn the carpenter's trade, hut. find- 
ing that employment uncongenial, he began 
operating the McPherson farm of one hun- 
dred acres, which at that time was owned 
by his wife. lie made many improve- 
ments and still owns the place. Rent- 
ing his farm in [876, he returned to Qin- 
ton and opened pool and billiard parlors. 
which he successfull) conducted until 1890 
and has since lived retired. lie purchased 
the Jesse Stout propertj on hast Main 
street and huilt a tine two-story building 
for hotel purposes, known as the Phares 
Hotel, and on the south end of the same lot 
erected a tenement cottage. He has dealt 
in real estate to some extent and has met 
with fair success in all his undertakings. 

In [855 Mr. Phares married Miss Mar- 
garet J. Met haw. a daughter of John J. Mc- 
Graw. She was horn in [839 and died in 
[876. By this union were horn the follow- 
ing named children : Charles l.eander. who 
married Kate Offenhaugh and follows farm- 
ing three miles south of Maroa; Sarah, wife 
of T. C. Cackley. of Clinton: Mary Eliza- 



hetli. wife of William Stagg. of Spring- 
field. Illinois: Effie, wife of Loran Hil- 
dreth, of Texas township: Francis M.. who 
married Effie Holloway and follows fann- 
ing in DeWitt county: John Allen, an elec- 
trician, who married Myrtle Ball and re- 
sides in Clinton; and Ella, wife of Charles 
Richie, of Chicago. 

Socially Mr. Phares is a Royal Arch 
Mason, a member of the blue lodge, chap- 
ter, council and commandery. all of Clinton. 
While living in the country he served as 
school director for the long period of twen- 
ty-one years, representing the Republican 
party; was township treasurer two years; 
and superintendent of the DeWitl County 
Agricultural Association thirteen years, and 
president of the same two years. lie be- 
1. ngs to an old and highly esteemed family 
of this county, of rare constitutions, and ail 
take great pleasure and pride in their fam- 
ily reunions, which they hold annually. 



HENRY *.. BEATTY. 

One of the leading business men and 
most highly respected citizens of Clinton 
is Henry G. I '.catty, a well-known wholesale 
and retail dealer in harness, buggies, etc.. 
having one of the largest and oldest estab- 
lishments of the kind in DeWitt county. 
1 lis hand-made harness and saddlery, especi- 
ally, has won for him an excellent reputa- 
tion in business circles. 

Mr. Beatty was horn in Hancock coun- 
ty. Ohio. April 14. 1845. a son of Isaac 
B. and Eliza (Crowl) Beatty. The father 
was horn in Findlay, Ohio, and was also 
engaged in the harness and saddlery busi- 
ness. In 1848 he came to Clinton, ami was 
one of the first to engage in that enterprise 



the p,ror.R.\rincAL RECORD. 






in this city. Here he carried <>n business 
until 1875, when Ik- sold out i<> Daniel 
Hampshire and removed to Normal, Illi- 
nois, in order to give his children better 
educational advantages. After spending 

two >>r three years at that place he returned 
t<> Clinton and entered into business with 
his sen. Thomas 0., hut two years later he 

I his interest to our subject and retired. 
His first wife, who was the mother of <>ur 
subject, died about 1850, at the age "f forty 
years. By that union he had six children: 
William and Charles, both deceased; Henry 
i. and James C, twins, the latter now a 
resident of Decatur, Illinois; Isaac B., de- 
ceased; anil Julia, wife of 11. C. Adams, of 

'd<m. Illinois. For his second wife 
Isaac B. Beatty married Mrs. Phoebe L. 
( Hill) Mahan, by whom he had three chil- 
dren: Mr-. Mary Coults; George II.. a 
resident of Stonington, Illinois: and Thomas 
0., of Clinton. The family residence was 
at No. Si South ('enter street. The father 
was an active member and officer in the 
Methodist Episcopal church and a mem- 
ber of the Independent Order of Odd Fel- 
lows. He died ill 1887, at the age of sixty- 
seven years. 

Coming to Clinton in [853, Henrj G. 

tty commenced working at the harness 
maker's trade, and has since devoted his 
time and energies to that business. His 
labors were interrupted, however, by his 

ues in the Civil war. enlisting in [863 
in Company F. Second Light Artillery, in 
which he served until hostilities ceased. 
He then returned home ami became as 
ciated with his father in business until 1873, 
when he removed to Kenney, Illinois, where 
he engaged in the same business quite suc- 
- fully, and there built a business block, 
but in March. iSX<>. his property was de- 
stroyed by tire when the whole business 



center of the place was burned. Mr. 
Beatty's loss was thirty-three hundred dol- 
lars, which was all that he had. it repre- 
senting his entire accumulations. He was 
one of the enterprising business men of the 
village who at once set on foot a movement 
to rebuild the business portion in brick, but 
not meeting with sufficient support, he re- 
turned to Clinton, and purchased the stock 
of William Metzger. Renting a building 
in the Union block, he once more embarked 
111 the harness and saddlery business at this 
place and soon built up a good trade, lb- 
has since purchased the building known as 
the I >. C. Jones store, where he carried 011 
his business until 1901, when he moved out 
and into the building where he learned his 
trade, and to-day carries a large and well- 
selected stock of light and heavy harness, 
whips, robes, etc.. and a tine line of car- 
riages and traps — the best which the town 
affords. He employs four -killed harness 
makers and trimmers, and manufactures 
some of the best harness found anywhere on 
the market. He is now rebuilding a hand- 
some brick block, twenty-two by one hun- 
dred and twenty-four feet in dimensions 
and two stories in height, which will be 
ready for occupancy November 1. He has 
also purchased the Barker property on 
West Main street, where he has a tine 
home. 

In [867 Mr. Beatty married Miss Car- 
oline S. Stocking, a daughter of John T. 
Stocking. She was a native of Trempealeau. 
Wisconsin, and died November 3. 1899, at 
the age of fifty-one years. By this union 
were born live children: Nellie F.. who 
married C. B. Armstrong, of Decatur. Illi- 
nois, and has one child. Sylvia: Ernest, who 
wedded Mary T. Stewart and is a<s, ci- 
ated in business with hi- father: William, 
who married C>ra Arnold and i- a hart:' 



244 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



maker of Clinton; James R., a laundryman, 
who is now sojourning in Colorado; and 
] [obert, also a harness maker. 

Mr. Beatt) is an active and prominent 
member of the Methodist Episcopal church 
of Clinton, in which he has served as trus- 
tee, class leader and superintendent of the 
Sabbath-school. Fraternally lie is a mem- 
ber of the Independent Order of < ^\<\ Fel- 
lows, the Rebekahs and the (.rand Arm) 
the Republic; and is past commander of 
his post. I le has always made the m 
of his opportunities, and his life illustrates 
what can be accomplished through industry. 
perseve - ood management and a de- 

termination to succeed. While a residenl of 
Kenney atn! took quite an active and prom- 
inent part in public affairs, and served as 
president of the town and also filled the 

e of alderman. 



VNDREW WILSON 

Andrew Wilson i- a fine representative 
of the native horn eiti i >wn- 

ship. Within the hound- of the farm in 
ion two. which i-> now his home, he was 
horn Vpril j. [843, to Thomas and Charlotte 
(Deffenbaugh) Wilson. Ilis mother was 
horn in Maryland, July 13, 1800. Hi- 
ther. Thomas Wilson, born November 22, 
1799, was also a native of Maryland. Thorn- 
Wilson moved when a hoy to Perry coun- 
ty, < >hio. during the early day- of the settle- 
ment of that state. There he was married 
to hi- wife. Charlotte, and made that his 
home for many years. Not satisfied to help 
settle 01 in 1835, with his family, he 

took the long and tiresome journey in <wa- 
gons through the pathless wilderness and 
came to Macon county, now DeWitt coun- 
ty, and into liar]) township. Here he pur- 



chased a claim of forty acre- and also en- 
tered land from the government. There 
wa- a -mall log cabin on the claim, hut he 
soon built a house which still stands on the 
farm owned by Andrew. Deer were nu- 
merous and \\ol\e- gave the few settlers 
at that time much trouble. 

Mr. Wilson was a man of unusual en- 
ergy, enterprise and industry. Me put his 
land rapidly under cultivation. Seeing there 
\\a- great need of a grist-mill and a 
sawmill, he erected a mill on the North 
Fork of Salt (reek in section two. Harp 
township. In [840 he added a mill sti 
which wa- a boulder such a- arc common 
on the prairies of this county. 'Then for 
man) year- people came from mile- around 
to have their corn ground. 

Mr. Wilson was a large cattle dealer 

■ho. i- earh days and drove his herd- to 
Chicago, where also he hauled his grain. 
When Thomas Wilson located in this county 
he had only hi- horses and wagon and from 
that beginning by hard work and close ap- 
plication to hi- business lie worked his way 
up the ladder of wealth till he was the owner 
of fourteen hundred acres of land, lie was 
an old line Whig in politics and one of the 
most active for the welfare of the township. 
Ilis memon i- -till cherished as one who 
bravely bore the hardships of pioneer days 
and helped to make the paths smooth for 
those who came after, lie died November 
10. [863, at the age of sixty-four year-. 

Mr-. Wilson wa- a woman of unusual 
capability and force of character. When a 
girl she rode from Maryland to Ohio m\ 
horseback and later made a trip in the same 
manner to visit her old home in Maryland. 
She was a devoted member of the Baptist 
church till the time of her death in 1X74. 
Mr. and Mrs. "Thomas Wilson had twelve 
children. -i\ hoys and six girls, all of whom 




ANDREW WILSON. 




MRS. ANDREW WILSON. 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 






lived till they reached manhood and woman- 
hood. Their children were: John, horn 
February -'-'. 1821, died April 23, 1864: 
Joseph, born February 16, 1822, died July 
8, [855; Alley, who was born September 8, 
]S_'4. married Absalom Stubblefield, and 
died April 18, [867; Aaron was born ( >< I 
her 3, [826, and died March i_\ 1881 : 
Mary, horn September 18, 1828, died Aug- 

31, 1854; Sarah, born October 26, i> 
became the wife of W. II. Anderson and 
died November 30, 1872; Asa, who was 
honi October 27, 1832, lives at DeWitt. 
Peter, who now lives in Harp township, was 
er 15, iS.%4- Rachel was 1 
>, and died April i<). 18 
Harriet. Lorn July 27, 1838. died February 
24. 1 S 5 7 ; Caroline was horn March [3, 
1841, and died April 19, 1859. 

Andrew, the subject of this sketch, and 
youi ' the twelve children, grew to 

manh 1 in Harp township and here . 

was educated. When a hoy he attended a 

school-house which was furnished with 
slab benches, heated by a large open tire- 
place and had a puncheon floor. It- win- 
dows were low and narrow* and a hoard put 
under them served as a writing desk. 

At an early age Andrew Wilson b< 
to till tl n his father's farm. At the. 

of twenty he took up his life work. 
After his father's death he managed the 
home farm for his mother. Later he pur- 
chased of her two hundred and sixty-nine 
acres of improved land. 'I this he has added 
more till he now owns over live hundred 
acres of well cultivated land. A part of this 
which is in Wilson township he rent-. His 
farms are well fenced and have fine build- 
ings. Liking to see things looking their 
he keeps his property in excellent order 
He takes just pride in his herds of registered 
Short Horn cattle. 



Mr. Wilson was married Februar 
1870, to Miss Mary M. Field, who was horn 
in Ohio. October 8, 1S4.). She was the 
daughter of Jonathan and Mary Field. 

Mr. and Mrs. Wilson became the parents 
of three children, two of whom. Thomas 
and Jesse, are now living, and both are at 
home. Charlotte died February 14. 1901. 
Mrs. Wilson died Februar) ;. She 

was a member of the United Brethren church 
and a woman whose life was so helpful and 
cheerful that she won the respect and I 
of all who knew her. 

March 22, [892, Mr. Wilson married 
Miss Clarinda Smith, who was born in De- 
Witt county. Illinois. She is a daughter of 
John A. and Hannah (Rosencrans) Smith. 
Her father. Mr. Smith, born on the river 
Rhine, in France, in 1827, is at present a 
resident of Wapella township. Her mother 
was born in Butler county. Ohio. April 15, 
iSjS. She died April 11. 1892, and is 
buried in Crum cemetery, near Wapella. 

Andrew Wilson is a man of excellent 
business qualification-. He i- a strong sup- 
porter of the principles of the Republican 
party. For a number of years he has held 
the office of road supervisor ami school di- 
rector. As a citizen he ranks as one of the 
most prominent and- influential of his town- 
ship, a worthy son of his efficient pioneer 
father. 



GEORGF W. GRINER. 

Among the highly respected and hon- 
ored citizens of Barnett township is num- 
bered George W. Griner, who dates his 
residence in DeWitt county from October, 
185,}. and whose home is now on section 
31, Barnett town-hip. He was horn in 
Xew Jersey, on the 22d of June. 1835, a 



•5o 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



son of William and a Miss (Brooks) 
Griner, also natives of that stale. His pa- 
ternal grandfather. James Griner. was born 
in Germany, and on coming to the new- 
world in colonial days, settled in New Jer- 
sey. He served with distinction as a cap- 
tain in the Continental army during the 
Revolutionary war. His last years were 
spent in Indiana, where lie died at the ex- 
treme "Id age of one hundred and ten years. 
About [838 the father of our subject, ao 
companied by his family, removed to Mar- 
ion county. Indiana, where his death oc- 
curred in 1850. The mother had died in 
her native state, and the father subsequently 
married again. 

George VV. Griner had hut a meager 
chance to gain an education, as he was only 
able to attend school for a few weeks .lur- 
ing the winter, and from an early age he 
was dependent upon his own resources for 
a livelihood. For five years he and his 
brother engaged in farming together upon 
rented land. In [853 he came to DeWitt 
county, Illinois, where he worked as a farm 
hand by the month for two years. 

In Tunbridge township, this county. Mr. 
Griner was married. November _'.;. 1855, 
'o Miss Mary Copenberger, who was horn 
here. Here father. George Copenhagen, 
was born in Tennessee, and about 1825, 
when a young man. he came to Illinois ami 
served in one of the early Indian wars ol 
this section. He married Miss Nancy 
Henderson, a native of Kentucky ami a 
daughter of John Henderson, who was one 
of the first settlers of DeWitt county. Illi- 
nois, hut afterward returned to Kentucky. 
Mr. and Mrs. Copenberger were married 
in this county, and made their home in Tun- 
bridge township, where he followed farm- 
ing f( ir many years. 

For a vear after his marriage Mr. Griner 



engaged in fanning on rented land, and 
then removed to a tract of forty acres in 
Barnett township owned by his wife, it 
being a part of their present farm. To it he 
has since added eighty acres, and has made 
many useful and valuable improvements 
thereon until it is now one of the most de- 
sirable farms id' its size in the locality. Mr. 
Griner has always given considerable at- 
tention to stock-raising, and now makes a 
Specialty of a high grade of Hereford cat- 
tle, which he keeps for dairy purposes, and 
he is accounted one of the best butter mak- 
ers in his part of the county. 

Mr. and Mrs. Griner are the parents ol 
the following named children: 1 1 1 Jane 
is tin- wife of Alfred Trowbridge, of Mid- 
land City, and they have four children: 
Aila. who is the wife of George Phelps and 
has one son. Fillmore; Ura, wife of David 
McClimans; Charles; and Homer. ( _> ) 
Nancy married < i. E. Kimble, of Missouri, 
where she died in February, i<)oi, leaving 
four children, Elsie, George William. Ethel 
and Oldman. (3) George lb aids his fa- 
ther in carrying on tin home farm. 14 I 
( >llie May. who is the wife of J. II. Decker, 

it for the Illinois Central Railroad at 
Midland City, and they have two children, 
Nellie and Delia. (5) Mary is the wife -1 
Robert Jenkins, a farmer of this county, 
and they have three children. Dudley. Pearl, 
Ara l.ucile. MO Ida M. is the wife of 
William Britton, of Clintonia township, 
this count v. and they have one child, Mary. 

Since attaining his majority Mr. Griner 
has always affiliated with the Democratic 
party, and has supported every presidential 
candidate of that party since casting his fust 
vote for James Buchanan. He served two 
terms as school director, but has never cared 
for official honors. His wife is a member 
of the Cumberland Presbvterian church. 



Till", r.hxik U'lln \1. RECORD. 



-5< 



and both arc held in high regard by all who 

know them on account of their sterling 

worth. 

■» • » 

WILLIAM LONG. 

This well-known and highly-respected 
citizen ni (.'reek township, residing on sec 
tion 17. is a native of Carroll county, Ohio, 
horn October 17. 1838, and is a son of 
Young Benjamin and Catherine (Weaver) 
Long, natives of Ohio and Maryland, re 
Spectively. The parents were married in 
the Buckeye state, where they continued to 
live for some years, and about [850 re- 
moved to Bartholomew county. Indiana. 
where the father purchased a farm and en- 
gaged in its operation until called to hi-- 
final rest in [852, at the age of fifty years. 
His wife survived him many year-, passing 
away in 1893, at the age >'i seventy-nine. 
They had ten children, of whom -even are 
now living, namely: William, our subject; 
John, a resident of Indiana: Betsy, wife of 
Thomas Miller, of that state; Ellen, wife 
of Hiram Royse, of-Piatt county. Illinois: 
Mary, wife of Peter Stilabower, of Indiana: 
Hannah, wife of John Walter, of the same 
state: and Isaac, also a resident of the 
Hoosier state; Philip was killed at Gun- 
town, Mississippi, during the war of the 
Rebellion. 

William Long began his education in 
the public school- of Ohio and finished it 
in Indiana after the removal of the family 
to that state. < hi leaving the parental roof, 
at the age of twenty-two year-, he worked 

I farm hand for a few year-. In [868 
he went to Kansas, hut remained there only 
a few days, and on hi- return -topped in 
Macon county. Illinois, where he -pent two 
years in farming upon rented land. At the 



end of that time he purchased an unim- 
proved farm of eight) acre- on section -~, 
Creek township, DeVVitt county, which, 
through hi- perseverance ami painstaking 
efforts, he ha- placed under a high State of 
cultivation, and to which he ha- added from 
time to time until he now has a well-im- 
proved ami valuable farm of two hundred 
and forty acre-. Besides hi- nice home. 
• lie of the most notable feature- of the place 
i- a never-failing well of pure water. 

On the 30th of November, 1860, Mr. 
I ong wa- united in marriage with Mi- 
Marietta Royse, who was horn in Indiana. 
I Kr parents, Aaron I'.. and Elizabeth (Mc- 
Guire) Royse, were both native- of the 
.-.line state, and were of W cl-h and Scotch 
de-cent. Her mother resides in Indiana, 
at the age of eighty-one year-, while her 
father died in that -tate. < >f the thirteen 
children horn to them, -even are -till liv- 
ing, namely: Henry, a resident of Monti- 
celln, Illinois; George, a resident of Piatt 
county, this -tale: John. Louis and Alice, 
all of Indiana: and Marietta, wife of our 
subject. Mr-. Long i> the third in order 
of birth in this family, and is the mother 
of nine children, a- follow-: < 1 1 Martha 
Alice i- the wife of Michael Taylor, of Ma- 
con county. Illinois, and they have three 
children. William Cleveland, Cynthia Etta 
and [da May. (2) John Henry, a resident 
of Creek township, DeWitt county, mar- 
ried • '•'.'la Threasher and has four chil- 
dren. Maude. Josie, Clarence H. ami Flor- 
ence. (3) Arie, also of Creek township, 

married Minnie Bennett and ha- three chil- 
dren, John Henry, George Leslie and Ruby 
May. i^) Charles, of Creek township, 

married Laura Farran and ha- three chil- 

1. Jay Bennett, Zella lav and Raymond. 

151 Daniel is at home. (6) Delia married 

David Gano, of Creek town-hip. ami did. 



•52 



Tin-: mock \pinr.\L record. 



leaving one child, May Marie. Three ether 

children are also deceased. The parents 

are both active and consistent members ol 

the United Brethren church, and are most 

estimable people. In polities Mr. Long is 

Democrat, and has filled some minor 

offices. 

■+-++ 

ISAAC X. B \ll.< IR. 

Among the leading business men of 
Clinton non< are more deserving of m 
lion in this volume than Isaac X. Bailor, 
the senior member of the firm of Bailor & 
Bryant, dealers in all kinds of hardware. 
ricultural implements, wagons, buggies, 
etc. They carrj a large stock, utilizing 
three floors, and have a tin shop and plumb- 
ing establishment in connection with their 
re. 

Mr. Bailor was born near I ancaster, 
Ohio, nil the 26th of \pril. 1850, and is a 
son of Lew is R. and t lharlotte 1 Martin ) 
Bailor, who were also natives of that state 
and were farming people. The father died 
in his forty seventh year, the mother in her 
fifty-sixth year, as she passed away in [877. 
They were the parents of eiglil children, 
namely: Catherine, wife of S. J. Thomas; 
Rebecca, deceased wife of Reuben Bannett; 

lisa, wife of William Moore; Isaac X.. 
cur subject; Ellen, wife of J. Lysinger; 
Annie, wife of \. Vbbott; Jennie, win 
W. Pierce; and John M., deceased. 

Our subject remained upon the home 
farm, giving his father the benefit of his 
labors until twenty-live years of age, and 
then engaged in the grocery business in 
Shelhvville. Illinois, for one year. In 1876 
he came to DeWitt county. Illinois, and 
rented a farm in DeWitt township, which 
he operated quite successfully, at the same 



time giving considerable attention to the 
raising of horses, hogs and short horn cat- 
tle. In [883 he removed to Clinton and 
purchased an interest in his present busi- 
ness, which was established by Philip Wolf 
in [872. Later the linn became Wolf & 
McHenry, and when Mr. Bailor purchased 
Mr. Wolf's interest the name was changed 
to McHenry & Bailor. In [89] Mr. New 
man succeeded Mr. McHenry, and lie, in 
turn, was succeeded 1>\ John h'.. Bryant in 
September, [900, since winch time business 
has been carried ( >n under the firm name of 
Bailor X Bryant. Upright and reliable 
business men. thev command a liberal share 
of the public patronage, ami to-day enjoy an 
I ade which is constantly increas- 
ing. Besides his business property Mr. 
Bailor owns a fine residence at No 513 
North tenter street, which was erected by 
linn. 

Mr. Bailor married Mis- Orilla Lemon. 

I ler father. ( '< ill irge B. I .euion. was 

born in Clark county, Ohio, October 1, 
[809, and was a son of John R. and Re- 
11. John R. I : 'in mi vva - a farm- 
er bv occupation ami served as judge of the 
county court for several veal's. Colonel 
Lemon first married Miss Charily Swisher, 
also a native of (lark o unty. Ohio, and 
by that union he had six children, live of 
whom reached man and womanhood. The 
wife and mother died in 1X4,}. and the fol- 
lowing year the Colonel wedded Mary J. 
Woods, and of this union there were six 
children, all living. lie came to DeWitt 
county, Illinois, just before the deep snow 
in [83I, and in [837 was chosen colonel 
of the state militia, which position he held 
until [848, taking an active part in raising 
troops for the Mexican war. with the ex- 
ception of about one year, during which 
time he conducted a driig store in Clinton. 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 






He was a stanch Republican cm<l a local 
preacher of the Methodist Episcopal 
church. He died in January. 1886. His 
wife passed away August 3, i<»oo. 

Mr. and .Mrs. Bailor have one child. 
Lena E., at home. The parents are both 
active members of the Methodist Episcopal 
church, and Mr. Bailoi a member 

of the Knights of Pythias fraternity and 
filled all the offices in his As a pub- 

lic-spirited and sive citizen, i 1 

his support to all enterprises calculated to 
advance the moral, social and material 
welfare "f his city and county, and hi 
hekl in high regard by all with whom he 
comes in contact, either in business "i 
cial lite. 



CHARLES M - 1\ 

Charles M. Scott, a resident of Harp 
township and one of the pr young 

fanner- of tin- locality, was horn in He- 
Witt county, Texas township, Illinois, on 
March 28, 1876, and lie i- a son of Martin 
P. and Hattie L. (Baker) Sett. Martin 
P. So •!! was born in Tunbi ivnship, 

DeWitt county, and his wife was born in 
Mew York -tate. hut came to Illinois 
ciily live ye a These parents now 

live in Texas township upon a line farm. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Martin 1'. Scott were 
born eight children, as follows: Aha. who 
married Charles Kirkpatrick and re-ides at 
Kenney; Charles, our subject; Eddie, who 
lives with his parent-: Ida L., who married 
Fred Henderson.and they reside at Kenne) : 
Effie, Blanche, I'ra and Ina, all of whom 
reside with their parents. 

Charles M. Scott attended the district 
schools in Texas township and also in Tun- 



bridge township, after which he took a 
teacher'- course at Valparaiso College, In- 
diana, from which he was graduated on 
Januaiy 17. 1895. He then taught school 
for about four years in the district 
in this county, anil on January 4. iN<><>. ''^ 
- married to Mis-, (.race Stubblefield. 
She was horn in Harp township and is the 
daughter of M. 11. and Mary 1 Foley) Stub- 
blefield. M. H. Stubblefield was horn in 
McLean county on April 12, 1S41. and he 
i- the son of Absalom and Eliza (Pi 
Stubblefield. Th< ndparents were 

from Ohio hut moved to Indiana and then 
to McLean county, Illinois, in 1827, and 
there the grandfather died in iN<)4. a. 
eighty years, but his wife died when s 
wa- only twenty-seven years of age. M. 
II. Stubblefield, father of Mr-. Scott. 

Idier in Company A. < >ne Hundred and 
.■•nth Illinois Volunteer Infantry, 
and he was with Grant at Vicksburg, Smith 
at \\v<\ River and Sherman in his fan* 
march througl sjia. In [866 Mr. 

Stubblefield in Harp town-hip, 

where he now resides with his son-in-law, 
Ernest Lit Hi- wife died on' 

May 26, 1900, and -he is buried in \V 1- 

burn cemetery at Clinton. To Mr. and 
Mrs. Stubblefield were horn four children, 

viz: Lafayette, who did in childh I: 

Edna, who married Ernest Litsinberger, 
and they live in Harp township and h; 
two children. Lucile and Lela : Grace, who 
married Mr. Scott: and Waller, who 
with hi- father. 

After his marriage Mr. Sett farmed 
a year on rented land in 1 wn-hip 

and then rented hi- father-in-law's farm 
two hundred and eighty acre- in Harp 
township, which he now live- upon and 
where he carries on general farming ami 

k-raising. He own- one of the tx 



254 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



bred " Aberdeen Angus" bulls in the county. 
The remainder of bis cattle are high-grade 
Aberdeen AngUS. 

One child has been burn to Mr. and 
Mrs. Scott, namely: Ralph E., a bright 
little fellow. Mr. Scott is a Republican in 
politics. Mrs. Scott is an earnest member 
of the Methodist church. They are both 
enterprising young people, whose future is 
very bright, and they are destined to be- 
come wealthy and influential representa- 
tives '>\ the agricultural interests of De 
Witt county. 



\\ 11.1.1AM 11. R.WD \l.l. 

N'ot only is Mr. Randall one of the 
prominent farmers of DeWitt county but 
be i-~ also a business man of ability, and 
closely identified with all thai promotes en- 
terprise and enlarges the commercial and 
oilier welfare of his township and stale. 
A native of Ohio, he was born in Preble 
county. September l6, 1S51, and is a s, ,n of 
Andrew C. and Ursula (Cox) Randall, na- 
tives, respectively, <>i Treble and Butler 
counties. Ohio, and the former one of the 
lust known of the pioneers who came to 
DeWitt county in the latter fifties. Will- 
iam II. received his education in the public 
schools of DeWitl county, and lived on the 
home farm until twenty-one years <'i age. 
llis natural ambition and independence then 
asserted itself, and he started out to face the 
problem of an individual livelihood. .\s a 
preliminary, he rented land on section 31, 
Texas township, for eight years, and 
eventually purchased one hundred and sis 
acres on section 30. in the same township. 
From time to time other lands have come 
into his possession, and he now also owns a 



quarter section on section 25, Tunbridge 
township, llis land is well tilled, and yields 
satisfactory harvests in response to his in- 
cessant industry and excellent management. 
\ large and substantial dwelling has been 
erected, convenient barns and outhouses, 
and it is needless to say that all modern 
implements which tend to scientific and up- 
to-date farming have been added, regard- 
less of cost. Eight years ago Mr. Randall 
purchased an interest in tin- Row ell Eleva- 
tor Company, of which he is manager, the 
elevator having a capacity of twenty thou- 
sand bushels. In politics he is a Republican, 
and has held the office of collector and school 
trustee, although he makes 110 effort to se- 
cure official recognition. Fraternally he is 
associated with the Kyle Lodge, No. 282, 
Knights of Pythias, of Kenney, Illinois. 

On December 3, 1873, Mr. Randall mar- 
ried Alice Putnam, a native of Scott coun- 
ty, Illinois, and a daughter of Jason and 
Eliza (Drummond) Putnam, the former a 
native of New Jerse) and a farmer during 
the years of his activity. Mr. Putnam re- 
moved to DeWitt county manj years ago, 
and during the latter part of his life lived 
in Texas township, but later moved to Mis- 
souri. Barton county, where his death oc- 
curred in 1881, at the age of fifty-seven 
years. He was well-to-do ami a reliable and 
upright man. and v\ . emed by all who 

knew him. llis wife died before he re- 
moved to Texas township. 'To Mr. and 
Mrs. Randall have been born the following 
children: Frank, who is attending the col- 
lege at Valparaiso, Indiana, is twenty-seven 
years of age, and has for some time taught 
school in 'Texas township; l.uella. who is 
the wife of Fred Owens, has one child, 
Hubert, and lives on a farm of one hundred 
and fifty-six acres on section 19, Texas 
township: Fred, who is assisting with the 



Tin-: biographical record. 



255 



care ami management of the home farm: 
Harry; Mabel; and Rolla. The children 
were all born in Texas township, all were 
educated in the public schools, and the last 
three named, are living at home. 

Andrew C. Randall, the father of Will- 
iam 11.. 1- one of the strong and reliable 
pioneers in whose keeping has rested the 
accepted responsibility of bringing aboul 
the splendid agricultural prosperity of De 
Witt county. From lands wild and timber 
covered he has participated in the general 
development, watched with the eye of the 
enthusiast the clearing of the trees, the erec 
tit >n of comfortable homes and the incre 
ing fertility and yield of the well-tilled 
acres. A man <<i force and determination, 

d judgment and kindly heart, he has 

essarih impressed In- worth upon the 
community, and i- appreciated in propor- 
tion as his services have been fundamental 
in building up the township. A native of 
Preble county, Ohio, he was born January 
[8, [823, and i- a son of Jehu and Eliza- 
beth (Conrow) Randall, natives, respect- 
ively, of South Carolina and Ohio. The 
father removed to Ohio with his parents 
When a young man. and in the timber him- 

■ and wife Started life together, and eon- 
tinned to farm until his death, at tin- age of 

ty-five year-. his wife surviving him un- 
til ninety-three year- of age. They were 
the parents of nine children, four of whom 
are living, Andrew C, being second in oiiler 
of birth. 

During such time a- he could he spared 
from hi- duties on hi- father'- farm Mr. 
Randall attended the early subscription 
schools. < hi departing from the homestead 
to seek his own living, he came to Illinois 
in [857 and purchased the farm upon which 
he now lives, and which consists of eighty 
acre- of rich land on section 34, Texas 



township, lie ha- here engaged in general 
farming and the ordinary amount of -t<»ck- 
raising, his farm being mosl complete as 
far a- improvements ami buildings are con- 
cerned. .Mr. Randall i- a Republican in 
politics, and i- identified with the Inde- 
pendent Order of Odd Fellows since Oi 

tolicr. 185 1. 

The marriage of Mr. Randall and Ur- 
sula Cox occurred in [846, Mr-. Randall 
being a native of Butler county. Ohio, and 
a daughter of Gilbert and Anna (Cra 

Cox, the former a farmer and mechanic by 
trade. Mrs. Randall wa- a helpmate, in- 
deed, to her husband, a woman of sterling 
characteristics, in whom wa- combined no- 
bility and gentleriess and ideal motherly 
trait-, and whose death, in 1888, at the 
of sixty-five years, left a void in the hearts 
of all who knew her. The children horn to 
.Mr. and Mrs. Randall are a- follow-: Ann 
Eliza, who is the wife of Isaac Smith, of 
Peoria, Illinois, and who. by a former mar- 
riage with Sylvanus Cooper, had five chil- 
dren. William. Cora, Ada. Sadie and Eva; 
Gilbert C. who is a liveryman at Mitchell, 
South Dakota; William II.; Lydia Ellen, 
who is the widow of Jacob Cree, ha- one 
child. Elmer, and lives in Clinton; Mary A., 
who i> the wife of Alfred Geiling, of Ed- 
gar county. Illinois, and ha- the following 
named children: Pearl, (ail. Frank, Eva, 
Homer and Raj ; John, who married Mag- 
gie Revis, ha- .me child, Alva, and lives on 
a farm in Piatt county; l.ettie. who is the 
wife of Corwin Smallwood, has two chil- 
dren. Clarence and [na, and live- on the 
home place with her father and husband; 
Cornelius, wh" i-, a farmer in I'iatt county; 
and James, who i- farming in I'iatt county 
with his brother Cornelius, has two chil- 
dren. Freda ami I. eta. By a former mar- 
riage with a Mi-- Cochran, who died -even 



! 5 6 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



years ago, James Randall had one child. 
Adelpha. 

Of the ancestry of the Randall family, 
the paternal grandfather of Andrew Ran- 
dall was of English descent, was born in 
South Carolina and moved to Ohio many 
years ago with his father and five brothers 
and tw> sisters, and here the grandparents 
lived and died. < >n the maternal side the 

idfather was John Conrow, a native of 
New Jersey, and of English- Welsh 
scent, ami who removed t>> Ohio, where he 
eventually died at an advanced age. 



CHARLES WALKER ATCHISON. 

Anient;- the prosperous and substantial 
fanner- of Waync-villc township there is 
probabh none more energetic or thorouj 
going than the gentleman whose name in- 
troduces tin- sketch. Walker Atchison, as 
he i- familiarly called, now own- and opi 
ate- a large and valuable farm on section 
thirty-one, including the old homestead 
where he was hern on the 17th of April, 
1842. Hi- ancestors on the paternal side 
were of English and Scotch extraction and 
were early settler- of Virginia. Hi- lather. 
[sham Atchison, was hern in that state, in 
1X04. and wa- a son of George Atchison, 
al-< 1 a native of the Old Dominion. At an 
early day the family removed t" Kentucky. 
where they were numbered among the pio- 
neers, and where Isham Atchison grew to 
manhood and wedded Miss Mary Crawford, 
a native of that state. They -continued 
make their In .me there until after the birth 
..I' three of their children, ami then came to 
Illinois in 1833, locating in DeWitt county, 
where the father entered -nine land and 
bought mure, it being now the property 



our subject. The first home of the family 
11: this county was a rude cabin, which was 
later replaced by a more substantial struc- 
ture of hewed logs. A number 01 war- later 
the present residence was built and many 
other useful and valuable improvements 
have been made as time ha- passed until 
it i- now a most attractive and desirable 
farm. In earl) life the father of our sub 
ject learned the blacksmith's trade, and 
r coming to this county did hi- own 
\ oik in that line. He died here in [880 
honoied and respected b) all who knew 
him. The mother departed tin- life in [866 
leaving five children, namely: George, now 
deceased: John l\. who is living with his 
brother on the old home farm: Charles 
Walker, of thi- review ; David, a residenl of 
Waynes\ ille : and Mrs. Elizabeth Eskew, of 
Peoria, Illinois. 

Walker Atchison never left the parental 
roof, and at an earl- ok charge of the 

farm ami business for his father, who wa- 
in- well along in years Later he boughl 
the interests of some of the heir- ami - 
ceiled to the farm, and has since added to 
hi- landed possessions until he now has four 
hundred ami thirt) five acre- of ven valu- 
able land. Tin- hi >use w here 1 >ur m >w 
lives and which is now one of the large and 
substantial country houses of the county. 
was 1 mill 111 [840, and in it our subject was 
Imtii. and while many improvements have 
keen made, it is yet practically the same as 
the year it wa- built. 

( >n the i-t of September, 1864, in Logan 
county, Mr. Atchison was united in mar- 
riage with Mi-- Maria Hull, who died July 
11, [865, leaving one -on. Isham Johnson, 
who was reared mi the home farm and edu- 
cated in the schools of Waynesville. He 
married Mi— Vina Gambrel, a daughter of 
William < iamhrel. one of the prominent men 







ISHAM ATCHISON. 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL kl < I 






ut Barnett township, this county, and they 
on- child, Ethel. For his second wife 
our subject married Miss Fanny Gordon, of 
• a county, who died January 29, 1871, 
and the <'ii!y child born of thai union, Ber 
1.. died at the age of tw.. years, ["he 
last wife of Mr. Atchison was Mrs. Sarah 
A. ' ivho died Augusi 23, 1892. 

Mr. Atchison and his brothers arc all 
stanch supporters of the men and measures 
of the Republican party, and both John and 
Walker cast their first presidential ballots 
Abraham Lincoln, the former in [860, 
and the latter in 1864. They are active 
members of the Methodist Episcopal church 
of Waynesville, of which our subject has 
been a trustee for some years, and they are 
among the most highly respected and hon- 
ored citizens of the community in which they 

made their home and at 
widely known. 



WALTER M. TAYL< >R. 

This well-known business man of Clin- 
ton was born in the city where he still re- 
September 27. 1865, and is a son of 
William H. and Lucy (Merrill) Ta 
and a grandson of Henry and Mary (Mil- 
; raylor. The grandfather was born 
in Delaware in 1816, and in early life re- 
tinville, Ohio, where he made 
his home until coming to Clinton, Illinois, 
-3. Here he embarked in merchan- 
g as a member of the firm of Taylor & 
Bell. They purchased the corner now oc- 
cupied by the Magill House and erected 
a three-story frame building, stocking the 
same with a large line of dry goods, boots 
and shoes. Misfortune them 

about 1859, when their store was destroyed 
by fire and they lost almost everything. 
12 



Durmg the latter part of the Civil war 
Henry Taylor opened another stoic where 
Mr. Katz is now engag eneral mer- 

chandising, and there carried on busini 
under the firm name 1 if I .. 

> v Company until 1872, when he commenced 

dealing in lime, wood, a OUT 

subject is now located, in a small one-story 
building formerly known as the 

iperty. At his death he was eded 

by his son Fletcher C, who had become 

ciated with him in business in i>S8o, 
and in 1894 our subject and his father 
bought the interest of Fletchei and 

Walter M. became a member of the firm. 
The grandfather died in 1891, alter an hi 
1 rable and useful Hi /enty-fivi 

Mis wife passe. 1 away at the ity- 

two. They had ' children, some 

whom died young, the othei 

William II., Homer 11., Fletcher 
Frank ]'... Mrs. Nellie A. Blackford and 
Annie I I. 

William II. Taylor, the father of our 
rn in < >hio, June 1 . (836, 
and followed fanning until he joined the 
I "nil in army in [861, enlistii 
in Company F, Forty-first Illinois Volun- 
teer Infantry. His sketch ap] 
where in this work. 

Walter M. Taylor, of this review 
his boyhood and youth in his native city, 
and at the hig ' in the 

He then spent threi 
in southwestern Mexico, where he was in- 
terested in mining, and on his rein;:, home 

lined a position as fireman on the Illi- 
ntral Railroad, remaining in the em- 
ploy of' that company until injured in a 
wreck. His spine was injured, and from 
the effects of the same he has never fully re- 
as he v. en- 

e in active business he 1" m- 



26o 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



nected w ith the business established by his 
grandfather, and was in partnership with 
his father, William H. Taylor, from 1894 
until June. 1899, when he became sole pro- 
prietor. He has purchased more Land, 
built coal sheds and warehouses, and has 
remodeled and enlarged the other buildings, 
and under his able management the busi- 
ness has increased from a small business 
thirty thousand dollars per year. He deals 
in coal, wood, cement, paints, glass, etc., 
ami has built up a fine trade. He is a wide- 
awake, energetic business man. who by un- 
tiring industry and sound judgment has 
won a merited success, and is to-day con- 
sidered one of the leading business men 
the city. Socially he is a member of the 
blue lodge, chapter and Eastern Star chap 
ter of the Masonic order, and is quite popu- 
lar in both business and social circle-, He 
married Mi-- Cora Robinson, a daughter 
of R. \Y. Robinson, of Clinton, and they 
have one child. Lucy A. 



JOHN" P. BAYLESS. 

The subject of this personal narrative is 
one of the most enterprising and progn 

ive farmers and stock-raisers within the 
borders of Waynesville township, his home 
being on the north line of the county, on 
section 18. He has made his special held 
of industry an eminent success, and now 
owns and operates a well improved and val- 
uable farm of two hundred and forty acres. 
Mr. Bayless was born in Rush county, 
Indiana. September [3, (835. His father, 
Daniel Bayless, was a native of Ohio, 
born in 1 S 1 _• . and was a son of Daniel 
Bayless, Sr., who took his family to 
Rush county. Indiana, in 1820, becoming 
one of the pioneers of that region. There 



our subject's father grew to manhood and 
married Miss Malinda Jones, a sister of 
Colonel Jones, of DeWitt county, Illinois. 
Mr. Bayless opened up a farm in Rush 
county, Indiana, and continued its opera- 
tion until 1856, when he removed to De- 
Witt count}, Illinois, and settled in what is 
now Waynesville township. 

John P. Bayless was reared and edu- 
cated in the county of his nativity, but as 
his school privileges were meager, he is al- 
most wholly a self-educated man. lie ac- 
npanied the family on their removal to 
this county, and remained under the par- 
ental roof until twent) six years of age. 
Here he taught school through the winter 
months for about eight years. 

Mr. Bayless was twice married, and to 
these unions were burn eight children. 

Politically Mr. Bayless is a Republican, 
and cast his first presidential vote for John 
( . Fremont in 1850, though at local elec- 
tions he votes independent of party lines. 
He made the first assessment in Waynes- 
ville town-hip. but has never cared for 
office, preferring to give his entire time and 
attention to his farm and business inter- 
ests. He was made a Mason in [86l, and 
is now probably the oldest living member 
of Waynesville Lodge. 



ISAAC BAKER. 



Isaac Baker, a practical and enterprising 
agriculturist of Waynesville township, owns 
and operates a well-improved and highly- 
cultivated farm of one hundred and twenty 
acres on section 23. His possessions have 
been acquired through his own efforts, and 
as the result of his consecutive endeavor he 
has become quite well-to-do. 

Mr. Baker was born on the 19th of Feb- 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



261 



ruary, 1847, m Morgan county, Ohio, 
which was also the birthplace of hi> par- 
ents, Isaac and .Mary (Nulse) Baker. I lis 
paternal grandfather, Samuel Baker, was 
one of the first settlers of that state, and at 
a very early day came to Illinois, locating 
in McLean county. The father of our sub- 
ject was horn in 1813, and in early lite fol- 
lowed the cooper's trade. In the fall of 
1859 he and his family came to Waynes- 
ville, Illinois, hut the following year re- 
moved to McLean county, where he re- 
1 ~ome years. Later he returned to De- 
Witt county to make his home with a 
daughter, where lie died in 1885. His wife 
survived him about three years, dying in 
[888. They were the parents of thirteen 
children, eleven of whom reached mature 
years, ami three sons and two daughters 
are still living. 

the home farm in McLean county 
Mr. Baker, of this review, grew to man- 
hood, receiving his education in the district 
schools of the neighborhood and in the vil- 
lage >cho,.ls of Waynesville. He early be- 
came familiar with every department of 
farm work, and after leaving the parental 
1 in farming on rented land un- 
til 1887. when he purchased eighty acres of 
bis present farm, which was then but 
ijhtly improved. Later be added to it a 
tract of tdrty acres, making a good farm of 
one hundred and twenty acres on sections 
14 and 23. He has built a good residence, 
a large barn and other outbuildings, has set 
out fruit and shade trees and made many 
other improvements generally found upon 
a model farm of the present day. Resides 
his own farm, he operates two hundred and 
seven acres of land elsewhere, and is also 
successfully engaged in stock-raising. 

On the 6th of March, 1872. in McLean 
county. Mr. Baker was united in marriage 



with Miss Luanda Johnson, a native of that 
county, and a daughter of Jesse Johnson, 
who came to this state from Indiana at an 
early day. She died March 4. [890, leav- 
ing five children, namely: Frances Ellen, 
wife of Charles Cunningham, of McLean 
county; Olive L.. at home: Jacob 1'.. who 
is married and engaged in farming in 
Waynesville township: Arthur L. and Sid- 
ney L.. who assist their father in the opera- 
tion of the farm. Mr. Baker was again 
married in DeWitt county. October 21, 
[891, his second union being with Mrs. 
Laura Y. Buck, who was born in Logan 
county. Illinois, and is a daughter of Will- 
iam Russun, who came to this state from 
Ohio. By this marriage Mr. Baker has 
two children. Isaac and Emeline. 

In his political affiliations he is a - 
wart Democrat, and cast his first presiden- 
tial vote in [868, but at local elections he 
supports the men whom he believes hest 
qualified for office, regardless of party lines. 
His life has been one of industry and use- 
fulness and due success has not been denied 
him. 



CYRUS J0N1 3 

Cyrus Jones, who is now serving as 
a >unty a ironer 1 if DeWitt ci lunty, and one of 
the highly-esteemed citizens of Clinton, was 
horn in Madison county. Ohio, on the 5th 
of February, [836. His father. Allen Jones. 
was born in Culpeper county. Virginia, in 
[805, and was a son of William Jones, who 
was probably of Welsh descent. His an- 
cestors settled in Virginia prior to the Revo- 
lutionary war. and the records show that 
several of the family participated in that 
struggle. The grandfather of our subject 
followed farming throughout life and died 



262 



HI]-: BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



at an advanced age. His children were 
Mason. William. Allen, Charles, Mrs. Betsy 
Rosbery, .Mrs. Lydia Bates, Mrs. Sarah 
Jones, Mrs. South and Mrs. Nancy 
Dockum. 

In early life Allen Jones, the father of 
our subject, removed to Madison county, 
Ohio, where he followed the carpenter's and 
wagonmaker's trades until [855, and then 
came to Clinton, Illinois. Immediately after 
he went to Macon county, hut in the fall of 
1856 returned to Clinton, where he worked 
at his trade until his health compelled his 
retirement, lie bought a story-and-a-half 
building on the northeasl corner of the 
square, used as the first postoffice, and after 
moving it he remodeled the building, con- 
verting it into a good residence, it being now 
owned by Charles Hanger. He served eight 
years as justice of the peace and was a man 
highly respected and esteemed by all who 
knew him. When a hoy he was a noted 
flute player and won considerable praise for 
his playing, lie also played a life for soldiers 
of 181.', though quite small, a compan) 

Her- being camped near his fathi 
home. He wedded Miss Mary Dockum, 
who was horn in 1807 and died in [865. 
They were the parents of seventeen children, 
namel) ssa; Henry, deceased; Ma- 

tilda, wife of William Tonguet ; Thomas: 
Milton and 1 >a\id. both deceased : Cyrus, our 
subject; Amanda and Argus, both deceased; 
( 'harle- : Lemuel D. : Samuel ; Charlotte W. : 
Mrs. Lucretia Ludwick; Mrs. Maria An- 
derson; John (_). ; and Emma, deceased. 

rmg his boyhood and youth Cyrus 
engaged in agricultural pursuits. He 
accompanied his parents on their removal to 
this county, and when the Civil war broke 
out he enlisted in August, 1862, as a pri 
in Company B. One Hundred and Seventh 
Illinois Volunteer Infantry. He participat- 



ed in a number of engagements and re- 
mained in the service until the close of the 
war. being honorably discharged in July, 
(865. 1 li- first battle was the noted engage- 
ment at Huff's Ferry, during the siege of 
Knoxville, and he took part in all the en- 
gagements in which his company participat- 
ed, being in the campaign from Chattanoi 
Atlanta, Nashville and Franklin. ( In his 
Min to Clinton he resumed work at his 
trade and has built more fences in the coun- 
ty than any other man. his specialty being 
tine picket and fancy fences. lie bought 
the \\ eger property, which was his home 
some time, hut later traded it for the Lydia 
Taylor place, on East Washington street. 
which lie has remodeled and enlarged, mak- 
ing a very comfortable residence. 

Mr. Jones married Miss [sabel Bate-, a 
native of ( >hio and a daughter of \-,a Bate-, 
who on coming to this state settled in 
Springfield. By this union were horn seven 
children, as follows-. 1 1 1 Edward B. died 
when only a year old. (2) Herbert C, an 
engineer on the Illinois Central Railroad, re- 
siding in Centralia, married Allie Pulsifrr 
and they have three children, Goldie, Gale 
and Maud. (3) tail, junior member of the 
firm of Caldwell & Jones, who have on, 
the largest and most popular furniture sto 
of Clinton, married Susie Edward and they 
have one child. Doris. 14) Lottie and 
Xettie are engaged in dressmaking in Clin- 
ton. Mm Mabel, who is noted for her mu- 
ll talent, was graduated in music at the 
Wesleyan College in 1901, and is assist 
teacher in that institution. 17) Blanch B 
at home with her parents. 

In his religious views Mr. Jones B a 
Methodist, and in his social relations is a 
member of the Grand Army Post at Clin- 
ton, of which he was a trustee for several 
years. Politically he lias always been identi- 



IHE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



563 



tied with the Republican party, and on that 

ticket was elected coroner of. the county in 

2 and 1900, being the present 

incumbent He i> widely and favorably 

known, and is held in high regard by his 
many friends. 



h. c. SPAiximuk. 



H. C. Spainhour, who is now living a 
retired life "ii section 9, Creek township, was 
bom in Texas township, this county, Feb- 
ruary 26, [843, and is a son of Thomas 
- ainhour, whose birth occurred in Casey 
county, Kentucky, in August, 1819. His 
paternal grandparents. Warner and Polly 
(Davenport) Spainhour, were both natives 
of North Carolina, and after residing in 
Kentucky for several years came to Illinois 
in 1817, locating in Sangamon county when 
this section of the state was inhabited prin- 
cipally by the red men. Here the father 
our subject grew to manhood and for many 
years he was engaged in farming in DeWitt 
county, but is now living a retired life in 
Creek township. He tirst married Matilda 
Willis, also a native of Kentucky, and the 
mother of our subject. By that union six 
children were born, three sons and three 
daughters, of whom three sons are still liv- 
ing. Since the mother's death the father has 
been twice married, and by the last union 
also has six children. 

Our subject spent his boyhood and youth 
in Texas and Creek townships, and began 
his education in a primitive log school hi 
with its slab benches and puncheon floor. 
The writing desk was made by a plank laid 
upon pegs driven into the wall, and where 
a log was cut out greased paper was tacked 
over the opening to form a window. The 



school house was about a mile from the 
Spainhour homestead. Our subject was 
only able to attend school during the winter 
months, but he had some good teachers, in- 
cluding Logan McMurray, his first teacher. 
As there was no mill in this locality during 
his boyhood, his grandfather Willis made a 
o luple of burrs > lut 1 >f niggerhead rocks to 
grind meal, and continued to operate these 
cveral year-. 

During the Civil war Mr. Spainhour en- 
listed March 10. tSo_>. in Company < '. Forty- 
first Illinois Volunteer Infantry, under Col- 
onel I. C. Pugh. and tirst went t<> Pittsburg 
Landing. During the first day of the battle 
of Shiloh — April 6, 1862 — he was wounded 
in the left arm and was under the surgeon's 
care for ten days. On rejoining his com- 
mand he took part in the siege of Corinth 
anil then went to Grand Junction, Missis- 
sippi, and from there to Holly Springs, tak- 
ing part in the engagement at the latter 
place. Returning to Grand Junction his 
regiment went from there to Boliver, Ten- 
nessee, in the spring of [863. They were 
next ordered to the Tallahatchie river to in- 
tercept General Hardy and keep him from 
crossing that stream. From there they went 
t< > Memphis and with Grant's ex]>edition 
started for Yicksburg. but on reaching Cof- 
feyville they found that the rebels had de- 
stroyed their rations at Corinth and were 
compelled to fall back to Holly Springs, 
where they lived for a week on parched corn 
without salt until Sherman arrived with pro- 
vision.-. Returning to Memphis they took 
boats for the Yazoo river heights above 
Yicksburg. ami after capturing the fort and 

raying the magazine at that place they 
crossed the river ami were in cam]) opposite 
Vicksburg for a week. They were then as- 
signed to the extreme left of Grant's army, 
and were under tire in the siege of Yicks- 



264 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



burg for forty-nine days. From there they 
marched to Jackson. Mississippi, and in the 
hard-fought battle which occurred there July 
12, 1864. the regiment lost heavily, only six- 
teen out of the three hundred and fifty men 
who entered the light being able to stack 
arms around the colors after the engage- 
ment was over. The remnant of the regi- 
ment returned to Memphis, and in August, 
1864, the survivors were mustered out. Our 
subject remained in the service, however, 
and was with General Smith on the Red 
river expedition, and for a time was at 
Marietta, Georgia, and Kenesaw Mountain 
guarding railroads. His command was 
with Sherman in the Atlanta campaign and 
cn the march to the sea, and were then given 
charge of the prisoners captured on that 
march. By boat they proceeded to Fort 
Beaufort, South Carolina, and then marched 
with Sherman to Goldsboro, North Carolina, 
where Mr. Spainhour was mustered out 
March 29, [865. He returned home im- 
mediately, arriving here 'Hi the [3th of April. 
For two years after the war Mr. Spain- 
hour was engaged in farming on the shares 
for Asbury Smallwood. During that time 
he was married. January [8, 1866, to Miss 
Deborah Smallwood, a daughter of Asbury 
and Elizabeth Smallw 1. natives of Vir- 
ginia. Her father was one of the earliest 
settlers of Macon county. Illinois, having 
located there before the winter of the "deep 
snow." Unto our subject and his wife fif- 
teen children were horn, seven of whom died 
young, and David, the oldest, died May 20, 
1892, at the age of twenty-four years. Those 
living are Lura. who is now the wife of John 
L. Tackwell, of (reek township, and has one 
child. William Carl: Cory, who married 
Carrie Harrow and is operating a part of 
liis father's land; Virvin and Ellis, both at 



home ; and Xettie, Maude, Russell and Alma, 
all in school. 

After leaving his father-in-law's farm 
Mr. Spainhour operated a grist and sawmill 
on Salt creek, in Texas township, and then 
returned to the Smallwood farm. Later he 
erected a flouringmill on the Sangamon river 
in Macon county, but after running it six 
months he sold out and returned to Creek 
township. DeWitt county, where he rented 
the Peter Murphy farm one year. lie then 
returned to the old place and remained there 
until 1874, when he bought eight) acres of 
land in Nixon township. This he disposed 
of six months later, and then purchased one 
hundred and sixtv acres of his present farm 
in ("reek township, to which lie has added 
from time to time until he now has four 
hundred and twenty five acres of well im- 
proved and highly cultivated land on sections 
4, 5 and 9, and also has eight; acres on 
section 10. lie has given considerable at- 
tention to stock raising, hut in [901 laid 
aside all business cares and is now living a 
retired life. lie started on bis b sines- 
leer without a dollar, and the success that be 
lias achieved is due entirely to bis own in- 
dustry, good management and excellent busi- 
ness ability. During the war hi ded 
in saving thirteen hundred dollars. 

In politics Mr. Spainhour is a Democrat, 
and as one of the leading and prominent 
citizens of bis community be has been called 
upon to till official positions of honor and 
trust, lie served as collector several terms, 
and was county supervisor six consecutive 
terms, during which time he yas a member 
of all of the important committees, such as 
the finance and poor farm committees. He 
is a member of ( iilman Lodge, No. 455. K. 
1'.. and his wife is a member of the Chris- 
tian church. 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



265 



JOHN II. SAVELEY. 

John Henry Saveley, one of Clin 
wide-awake business men, whose success in 
painting, paper hanging and bill posting has 
brought him into prominence, was born in 
Urbana, Champaign county, Ohio, on the 
2ist of May, 1845. and is a s<.>n oi Henry 
and Ellen T. (Niles - eley. natives 
Virginia and New York, respectively. His 
paternal grandparents. Jacob and Elizabeth 
Saveley. were also natives of the Old 1 >o- 
minion. From that state they removed to 
Ohio and in 1S52 came to Illinois, living 
for a time in Clark, Schuyler and Shelby 
counties. The grandfather, who was a farm- 
er by 1 -ccupation, died at the age of seventy- 

His children who reached y< 
of maturity were John. Jacob, M. D., 
Ge 3 rah Ann. Laney. Polly and Hen- 

ry. The father of our subject also followed 
farming and died in Ohio, at the 

ty-four years, leaving two children: John 
II.. and Elizabeth, wife of Mat Crable. of 
Paris. Illinois. The mother subsequently be- 
came the wif : Sai el S rords, by whom 
she had two children. Lincoln and Emma. 
She died July 21, 1S7S. at the age of fifty- 
six year-. 

Being quite young when his father died 
John H. Saveley made his home with his pa- 
ternal grandfather until ten years of age, 
and then started out to make his own way 
in the world, first working as a farm hand. 
Later he learned the plasterer's trade. While 
living in Shelby county, in 1861, he enlisted 
as a private in Company F. Fifty-fourth Illi- 
nois Volunteer Infantry, and served nearly 
four years. He had previ' lusly had but little 
Opportunity to attend school, having pur- 
sued his studies only for a few months in a 
log school house, but while in the service he 
became interested in education, and while 



not on duty devoted his time to studying the 
books which he bought. After his return 
home he attended school for a time, and by 
reading and study has never ceased to im- 
prove his mind. 

On the 3d of November, 1865, ^' r - - v 
ley came to Clinton and opened an ovster sa- 
loon, to which he later added a stock of 
arrying on that business for a 
year and a half. He subsequently worked at 
the plasterer's trade, and on the 18th of July, 
[870, began painting and paper hanging, 
which business he has successfully followed 
ever since, employing many men during the 
bus !. He commenced bill posting 

in a small way in 1870. using old build 
on which to post his bills, his first place be- 
ing the old coal house on the court h< 

ire. covering its sides and roof. Later 
he had a bill board around the court h< 
square and has kept on increasing the space 
until he now has room f< >r fourteen hundred 
-beets. He is a charter member of the Illi- 
ii' >is Bill Posters' Association. In his paint- 
ing, papering and decorating he is unex- 
celled by any one in the county. He has 
been distributing agent for the Illinois Cen- 
tral Railroad in this city for the past five 
years, and i- recognized as one of the most 
energetic and enterprising business men of 
the place. He is now the oldest resident of 
Monn >e street, his home being at 515. where 
he first erected a two-room house, but has 
since enlarged and improved it. and now 
owns two residence- across the street. 

Mr. Saveley married Miss Ada Dalzell, 
who was l>orn in South Egremont, Mas 
chusetts, May 10. [849, and i- a .laughter 
of John and Eliza (Seeley) Dalzell. The 
father was born on the uth of July, t8l6, 
in County Down. Ireland, where hi- parents, 
Robert and Mary (Ballentine) Dalzell. 
-pent their entire lives. He and his brother 



266 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



David emigrated to America and located in' 
South Egremont, Massachusetts, where he 
served a seven-years' apprenticeship at car 
riage trimming. He subsequently went to 
Cleveland, < >hio, and still later to CJnionville, 
that state, and worked at his trade. While 
there he entered the Union army in 
1861. Firsl Ohio Regiment Artillery Volun- 
teers, Company C, serving until the close "i 
the war. In [ 872 he came to Clinton, Illinois, 
and trimmed the first phaeton made at this 
place. He was an expert at liis trade. From 
■choice he Spent hi-- lasl days at the Soldiers' 
Home in Dayton, < Ihio, where he died Sep- 
tember 13, 1890, and at his request was 
buried there. His wife, who was born Sep- 
tember 14, 1816, died in [860. Their chil- 
dren were George and Ann Eliza, both de 
ceased: \da. wife of our subject; Charles 
Henry, a residenl of Texas; and William, 
deceased. For twenty-six years Mrs. Save- 
ley carried on dressmaking in Clinton, era 
ploying from three to five girls and receiv- 
ing the patronage of the leading families of 
the city, 1>\ whom she is held in high esteem. 
She was very successful in business, and is 
very pi ipular and well liked. 

Mr. and Mrs. Savele) have four chil- 
dren, Charles Henn learned his trade with 
his father and worked with him until [899, 
when he went to Chicago, a id is now special 

police for the Chicago & Alton Railroad. 

He married Anna Cochran. Warren S.. a 
painter and paper hanger and hill poster of 
Clinton, married Dora Williams, and the) 
have one child. Edward. David L., who is 
in the employ of the telephone company at 
Clinton, married Mannae Bower and has one 
son, Henry. William !•'.. also a painter ol 
Clinton, married Cordelia Phillips, and their 
only son died in infancy. 

In politics Mr. Saveley is a stanch Re- 
publican and served as alderman from his 



ward two years. Socially he is a member 
of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, 
and religiously he and his wife are 1: e ibci - 
of the Methodist Episcopal church. 



JAMES 11. PRICE. 

Among the energetic and successful 
tanners of Wavnesv illc township, whose 
success is due entirely to their own unaided 
efforts, is numbered the subject of this bi- 
ography, who now owns and operates a line 
farm of one hundred and twenty acres on 
section 10, within a mile and a half of the 
\ illage 1 if Waynesville. I fe was born on the 
t2th of September, [839, in Page county, 
Virginia, of which state his ancestors were 
early settlers. I lis father, William Price, 
was also horn in that county, aboul [799, 
and on reaching manhood was united in 
marriage with Miss Mar) Decker, a native 
of the < >ld Dominion and of German de- 
scent. After farming for some years in 
his native county, William Price came to 
Illinois, in [850, and settled at Brooks 
Drove. Tazewell county, where he died in 
[852. I lis wife only survived him about 
two years. 

After the death of his parents James ||. 
Price was thrown upon his own resources, 
and his early life was fraught with many 
hardships and privations, For some time he 
worked as a farm hand. In [854 he came 
to DeWitt county and was in the eiTlploj of 
Samuel llainmitt for four or live years. 
Feeling that his country needed his services 
during the dark days of the Civil war, he 
enlisted in August, [862, in Company A, 
One Hundred and Seventh Illinois Volun- 
teer Infantry, which was assigned to the 
Army of the Tennessee. His first engage- 




JAMES H. PRICE. 




MRS. J. H. PRICE. 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 






ment was the battle of Krioxville, Tennes 
see, and was followed b) the Atlanta cam- 
paign. After the battle of Resaca Mr. Price 
was taken ill and sent to the hospital in 
Knoxville, where he remained three weeks. 
lie was then placed "ii detached duty in 
the quartermaster's department, where he 
served until the close «'t' the war. lie was 
mustered out at Knoxville and honorabl) 
discharged in time to reach home on the 4th 
day ot' July. 1865. For several year- there 
after he was engaged in farming "ii rented 
land. 

In September, [867, in this county, Mr. 
Price was united in marriage with Miss I'.ar- 
thena Williams, who was hum on the farm 
where Mr. Price now resides, and was a 
daughter of Moses and Catherine E. Will- 
iams, of whom extended mention is made 111 
the sketch of S. Dean Williams, mi another 
page of thi> volume. About 1871 he pur- 
chased his farm on section 19, Waynesville 
township, and to its further improvement 
and cultivation he has since devoted his at- 
tention with good results. The land is now 
well tiled ami fenced and under excellent cul- 
tivation, and a good set of .buildings adorn 
the place, making it a most desirable farm. 
In connection with general farming our suh- 
ject is also engaged in stock raising. 

Mr. Trice's first wife died in [879, and 
was laid to rest in Fremont cemetery. Mc- 
Lean county. She left three children, name- 
ly: 1 1 1 William M. is a well educated 
young man. having attended the Waynes- 
ville Academy, and also taking a commer- 
cial course at a business college in Lexing- 
ton. Kentucky. For eight or ten years he 
successfully engaged in teaching school, hut 
is now assisting his father in carrying on 

the home farm, lie possesses - 1 business 

ability and takes quite an active and promi- 
nent part in local politics, serving as a incin 



her of the count) hoard of supervisors three 

terms of two years each. While filling that 
office he was chairman of some important 

committees, and a member of a number of 

Others. lie has also served as township 
trustee three years, and has been a delegate 
to numerous comity and congressional con- 
ventions of the Democratic party, with 
which he always affiliates. (2) Mrs. Mvra 
Griffin is the next of the family. (3 1 Mar) 
Catherine is the wife of Matthew Connell, 
the present supervisor of Waynesville town- 
ship. Their only child. John S., died in in- 
fancy. In [88] Mr. Price married Mrs. 
Sarah Milhurn, who was horn in < Ihio, but 
was reared in Logan county, Illinois, where 
she was first married. By the second union 
there are two children, Leslie and Leo. 

The Democratic parly has always found 
in Mr. Price a stanch supporter of its prin- 
ciples, and he cast his first presidential vote 
For Stephen A. Douglos, "the Little Giant," 
in i860. He served six years as commis- 
sioner of highways, and was an efficient 
member of the school hoard ten or twelve 
years. He and his son William M. are both 
members of Waynesville Lodge, F. & A. M., 
and he als.. belongs to the Grand Army Post 
at that place, and his son to the < )dd Fellows 
lodge, in which he has filled all the chairs 
and is now past grand. For the success that 
he has achieved in life Mr. Price deserves 
great credit, ami he well merits the high re- 
gard in which he is held by his fellow citi- 
zens. 



HENRY J( ISEPH WAGNER. 

This well-known farmer, residing on sec- 
tion [5, Wilson township, is a man whose 
Successful Struggle with adverse circum- 

1 inces shows what can be accomplished by 



272 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



industry and economy, especially if a sensi- 
ble wife seconds his efforts to secure a home 
and competence. Coming to this country 
with no capital he was obliged to make his 
way in the world without the aids which are 
usually considered essential to success. 

Mr. Wagner was horn in Prussia, Ger- 
many, January _'_'. [836, and is a son of 
John Joseph and Anna Man 1 Kaus) Wag- 
ner, who spent their entire lives in that coun- 
try, the father being a well-to-do farmer. 
In the family were nine children, all oi 
whom are still living. Those who came 
to America are John, a gas litter of New 
York City; Charles, a blacksmith of the 
same place; Eliza, who is living in New 
York state; and llcnrv J., of this rex iew. 

As is customary in his native land our 
subject attended the public schools until 
fourteen years of age and dien learned a 
trade, working in a hatter's establishment 
for two years and a half. I 1c then returned 
home, where he spent aboul six months, and 
later was employed in a hotel for a time. 
Believing that the new world furnished bet- 
ter opportunities to ambitious young men. 
he came to America in [854 on the old sail- 
in- vessel. New York, which landed him 
safely in New York City after a pleasant 
voyage of thirty-two days, lie was accom- 
panied on this trip by his brother John. 

For about s, x months Mr. Wagner re- 
mained in New York, working at anything 
which he could find to do, and then went to 
Pennsylvania, where he worked as a farm 
hand at eight dollars per month for six 
months. In [855 he went to Lee county. 
Illinois, where he was employed in a hotel 
for two years and a half, and then secured 
work on a canal boat on the Michigan & 
Illinois canal, where he remained until [860. 
He then went down the Mississippi river to 
Vickshurg. where he worked as a mason's 



assistant until the fall of that year, when he 
went to Xew ( Irleans and was employed as a 
bus driver until the Civil war broke out. 

Returning to Illinois, Mr. Wagner en- 
gaged in chopping wood during the follow- 
ing summer, and then worked in the harvest 
fields of southern Illinois, and later around 
Bloomington, as the crops there were not 
readj tor harvesting quite as soon as those 
farther south. At the close of the harvest 
season he found employment in a brickyard 
at LeRoy, McLean county, where he re- 
mained two years and a half, and was next 
engaged in farming on rented land, in part- 
nership with another gentleman, for six 
years. On the expiration of that time he 
bought eighty acres of laud on section 15, 
Wilson township, DeWkt county, a part of 
which had been broken, with an old house 
standing thereon, hut there were no other im- 
provements. He planted hedges, set out 
fruit and shade trees, erected a good resi- 
dence and nice barn, and made many other 
improvements, so that he now has one of 
the best farms in the locality. He has also 
extended its boundaries from time to time 
until he now has two hundred and forty 
acres of rich and arable land under a high 
state 1 if cultivate m. 

On the 17th of December. [864, Mr. 
Wagner was united in marriage with Miss 
Caroline Bohn, also a native of Germany, 
who came to this country in [854 at the age 
of ten years, and to them were born nine 
children, as follows: 11) Charles, now a 
resident of Iowa, is married and lias three 
children. John. Sarah and Blanche. 12) 
Anna is the wife of William Jones, of 
Bloomington, Illinois, and has three chil- 
dren, Margaret. Frank and Anna. (3) Mar- 
garet is the wife of Peter Quailey. of Cali- 
fornia, and they have two children. 141 
Xancv is the wife of Daniel Sullivan, of 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



273 



Memphis. Tennessee, and they have two chil- 
dren, Albert and Frances. 1 5 1 John, a resi- 
dent of Wapella. married Minerva Green and 

they have one child. Laurence. ath- 

erine is a resident of Bloomington. 1 - 
Henry, (8) Frank and (9) lames are all 
at lv>me. The mother of these children died 
in 1884. 

Mr. Wagner was again married. October 
15, 1805. his second wife being Mrs. Berttie 
Kline, who was horn in Germany, and re- 
mained at home with her parents until 1872. 
her father being a wealthy farmer. She then 
took passage on a steamer at Hamburg, and 
after nine days spent upon the water landed 
in Xew York City. Three days later she 
started for Bloomington, where she worked 
out for a year, and in 1873 was united in 
marriage with James Johnson, an English- 
man, who died February 7. 1883, leaving 
two sons. Herman and Frank. She was 
without a dollar in the world, all that she 
had being her trunk and a few clothes, and 
at once sought employment that she 
might support herself and children. She 
worked as a housekeeper and at other occu- 
pations until July 12. 1884. when she wedded 
Joseph Kline, also a native of the father- 
land. They started in life with nothing, but 
by their combined effort- and untiring in- 
dustry they acquired five city lots in Normal, 
Illinois, which she still owns. Mr. Kline 

1 early in the year 1895. and in the fol- 
lowing October she became the wife of our 
subject, as previously stated. She had only 
-i-ter. who died in Bloomington about 

0. Mrs. Wagner i< a most estimable 
woman, who has proved to her husband a 
true helpmate, aiding him in every possible 
way. and to her he attribute- not a little of 
his success in life. He i- -till successfully 
in general farming and stork-rais- 
ing, and is now cue of the well-to-do citi- 



zen- of his community. He is a Democrat 
in politics and has served as school director. 
but has never card for p tlitical horn 
Both he and hi> wife are member- of St. Pat- 
rick'- church at Wapella, and are highly 
respected and esteemed by all who know 
them for their genuine worth and many ex- 
cellencies of character. 



AIAIX W. HUFFMAN. 

Alvin W. Huffman, of Farmer City, is 
the proprietor of one of the finest and larg- 
livery and boarding stables in DeWitt 
county, and is one of its most energetic and 
progressive business mert. He was born in 
this county on the 5th of July, i860, and is 
of German descent. His paternal great- 
grandfather, Christian Huffman, not only 
served four and a half years in the Revo- 
lutionary war. but was also in the war 
[812 for eighteen months. His earlv home 
was in Pennsylvania, but his last days were 
spent in the ( )ld Dominion, where he died at 
the age of eighty years. He had eight chil- 
dren, namely: Daniel, George. Laban, 
Christian, Jonas, Mr-. Elizabeth Helmick, 
Mrs. Arbogast ami Solomon. 

The last named. Solomon Huffman, was 
the grandfather of our subject. He was 
born in Greene count). Virginia, and was 
married in Randolph county, that state, to 
Elizabeth Westfall, who died young, leaving 
two children. Benjamin and Cornelius. For 
his second wife he married Hester Bonner, 
by whom he also had two children. Job and 
Sylvanus. Throughout life he followed 
farming and died in Pendleton county, Vir- 
ginia, in 1884, at the age of eight} years. 
He was a member of the Method i-t Epis- 
copal church and a man of many -terling 
qualities. , 



274 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



Cornelius Huffman, our subject"* father, 
was born in Pendleton county, Virginia, Au- 
gust 4. [833, and in early life traveled con- 
siderably. In 1854 he came to 1 )eWitt coun- 
ty. Illinois, and purchased a small tract of 
railroad land, which had been slightly im- 
proved by Henry Huffman. To its further 
development and cultivation he devoted his 
energies for some years, and as time passed 
added tn his original purchase until he is 
new a large land owner. Since [895 he has 
lived a retired life in Farmer City, where he 
owns a line home. 1 le is an earnest member 
of the United Brethren church and a Pro- 
hibitionist in iH.litics. lie married Mi-- 
Elizabeth Vance, a daughter of John and 
Elizabeth (Hensley) Vance, earl) settlers 
of thi-> cunty. She was lmrn in Athens 
county. Ohio, March 5. [838, and died Jan- 
uary 4. 1890. She was the mother of the 
following children : Alvin \V.. our subject; 
a son who died in infancy; Sophronia E., 
wife of S. F. Lewis; Sylvanus G., a resident 
of Clinton; Laura C, at home; George F., 
a resident of Weldon; and Nora B., wife 
S. E. I [1 'line-. 

Alvin W. Huffman grew to manhood 
upon hi- father's farm anil assisted in 
its labor. lie began life for himself 
upon a farm of eighty acres, which 
he subsequently sold, and then purchased one 
hundred and sixty acres of land in McLean 
county. ( >n disposing of that place be pur- 
chased a farm in Santa Anna township, De- 
Witt county. He now own? two hundred 
and forty acres of land in Sangamon town- 
ship, Piatt county, Illinois, where for some 
time be was successfully engaged in farming 
and stock-raising, making a specialty of fine 
horses. He has owned some valuable trot- 
ting stock, and for bis age is considered one 
of the best judges of horses and other stock- 
in this county. Besides his property in this 



state Mr. Huffman owns one hundred and 
sixty acres of land in Kansas. On the tst 
of November, 1900, he purchased of J. D. 
Ingles a good livery business in Farmer City, 
which was established in [889 by J. E. 
Foster. Renting his farm he has since given 
his attention to the livery business, and is 
meeting with excellent success. He has en- 
larged and remodeled his barn until it is 
now- one of the best in the county, and it is 
well equipped, as he keeps about thirty head 
1 >l' hi irses and twent) di >uble and single turn- 
outs, besides two 'buses and two cabs. He 
is always on hand to meet the sixteen trains 
which arrive daily in Farmer City, and in 
the conduct of his business employs six 
hands. 

.Mr. Huffman was first united in mar- 
riage with Mi-- Martha Rutledge, a 
daughter of John A. Rutledge. She died 
\la\ jo, [886, and in [889 Mr. Huffman 
married Miss Belle Mcrilield, a daughter 
of John ami Rebecca (Johnson) Mcrilield. 
Her maternal grandfather was John John- 
son, an earl\ settler of Wilson township, 
this county. ( In the paternal side her great- 
grandparents were James and Hannah Mcri- 
lield. natives of Virginia, who died near Le- 
l\oy, Illinois, the former at the age of 
eighty seven years, the latter at the age of 
sixty-five. Their children were Henry, John, 
Olive, Mary, Sarah, Nellie, Otha and Sam- 
uel. Henry Mcrilield, Mrs. Huffman's 
grandfather, was born in Greene county, 
Ohio, and died at the age of seventy-seven 
years. He made farming his life work, and 
efficiently served as sheriff of DeWitt coun- 
ty. 1 lis wife, who bore the maiden name of 
Catherine Conway, died when about seventy 
years of age. Unto them were born the fol- 
lowing children: John. Benjamin, Rachel, 
William, Aquilla, Newton, Providence, Mary, 
Hannah. Emilv, Harvev and lames. John 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 






Merifield, the father of Mr>. Huffman, 
born in McLean county Illinois, August i. 
•id in early life followed farming in 
Wilson township, DeWitt county, but in 

- Id his property there and bought 
a place near Farmer City, where he now re- 
he joined the boys in bhu 
mpany G, Ninety-Fourth Illinois Volun- 

Infantry. and served until the close of 
the war. He is now an honored member of 
the Grand Army of the Republic, and is 

nch Republican in politics. He has ten 
children, namely: James 11.. Charles E., 
n I\. Belle, Addie, Cera. Sherman, 
Jacob, Maud and Ilattie. 

Mr. and Mrs. Huffman are the parents 
three children: Ray. John and Dewey. 
Relig they are members of the United 

Brethren church, and politically he is identi- 
fied with the Democratic party. In business 
affairs he is prompt and notably reliable, and 
he commands the respect and confidence of 
all with whom he comes in contact. 



[ARLES R. GIDEON". 

One of the busi -t energetic and 

most enterprising men of Clinton is Charles 
R. Gideon, who deals in alT kinds of paper 
and paints and carries on a large bush 
painting, papering and decorating. He was 
born on the 3d of July, 1850, on East Main 
street, Clinton, in a house that occupied the 
site where Mrs. Holderman nsw reside- 
is a son of George William Gideon, wh 
for many years an honored citizen of this 
place. The founder of the family in Amer- 
ica was Peter Gideon. Sr.. a native of Hol- 
land, who, in company with his wife and son, 
Peter, Jr., started for the new world prior 
to the Revolutionary war. but the wife died 



en voyage. Peter, Jr., located in Maryland, 
Inn afterward remo .oudoun county, 

\ irginia, where he followed fanning until 
his death. Both he ami his father. Peter, S 
fought for the independence of the colonies 
in the Revolutionary war. The former died 
at the advanced age of ninety-six year-. He 
had three son-. ' William and Henry. 

Of this famil) Gideon was the 

nd father of our subject. He was born in 
Maryland and about 1819 removed to Cham- 
paign county. Ohio, where he made his home 
until coming to Clinton, Illinois, in 1S47. 
Here he conducted a hotel, where the Ma- 

ic block i- now located, but the build- 
ing was afterward m the father 

ur subject, remodeled and converted into 
what is now known as the City Hotel. The 
grandfather laid out the Gideon additi 
to Clinton, it being now a residence portion 

'ie city, and his home was on East Main 
street, where Mr-. Holderman now li 
Socially he was a member of the Mas< >nic 
der. He died at the age of ninety-tw 
and his wife, who bore the maiden nann 
Elizabeth Miller, and v a native 

Virginia, died at the 

Their children were ' s Armstead; 
Peter; Wesley; Samuel: Jacob; Mr-. Sarah 
therine, who first married a Mr. 
Gerry and second a Mr. Campbell: ) 
Ann Parker: and Mrs. Elizabeth Mitchell. 

subject's father, 
was born in Loudoun county, Virginia, in 
1813, and accompanied his parents on their 
removal to Ohio, and later to Illinois. He 
purchased a farm of eighty acres adjoii 
Clinton, on which the Woodlawn cemet 
has since been laid out. and he tied 

what is now the Charles Kellogg plai 

in the _ 
business in Clinton, and later bought the 
old Campbell store, which was a twostory 



276 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



building. This he moved to the lot adjoin- 
ing the City Hotel, and up to the time that 
he was railed to his final rest he conducted 
a hotel in this building. lie attained the age 
of seventy-six years. As one of the leading 
and influential citizens he was several times 
elected to the town council, and also filled the 
office of justice of the peace for a time. 
Fraternalh he was a member of the Inde- 
pendent Order of Odd Fellows. In early 
life he married Miss Lydia Kidder, who was 
born near Hartford, Connecticut, in 1811, 
and died in 1868. She was a dan-liter of 
Nathaniel Kidder. 

In early life Charles R. Gideon, of this 
review, learned the art of house painting, 
papering and decorating, to which business 
he lias since devoted his energies, and is to- 
day one oi the leading business men in his 
line in the city, employing seven or more men 
during the busy season. Since reaching 
manhood his sons have been associated with 
him. 1 te has done the painting and decorat- 
ing on man\ of the principal buildings of 
the city, and his own handsome residence. 
erected in 1900, excells all others in decora- 
tions. He possesses mpch artistic talent and 
has a rare and choice collection of drawings 
and paintings which he executed himself. 
He is a member of the Knights of Pythias 
fraternity and the l'ni\ersalist church, to 
which his father also belonged, but his 
grandfather held membership in the Meth- 
odist Episcopal church. 

In [873 Mr. Gideon wedded Miss Mary 
C. Bell, a native of Ohio, and a daughter of 
George and Phcebe Bell, of this county. By 
this union were born five children: George 
Walter. Paul, Edwin, Flora Belle and Pheebe 
Ellen. The si ins are all associated with their 
father in business. George Walter married 
Mrs. May Stell. 



JOSEPH ROBB. 

Prominent among the citizens of DeWitt 
county, who have witnessed almost the en- 
tire development of this section t<\ the state, 
is Joseph Robb, a thrifty and successful 
farmer residing on section 34, Waynesville 
township. IK' was born on his present farm 
May 2, 1830, and is a worthy representative 
of an honored pioneer family of this county. 
He is a brother of Eli 11. Robb, of Clinton, 
whose sketch appears elsewhere in this \"l- 
ume. 

Amid pioneer scenes our subject passed 
his boyhood and youth on the old homestead, 
receiving but a limited education, his time 
being principally devoted t" assisting his fa- 
ther in the arduous task of transforming the 
wild land into well cultivated fields. He re- 
mained at home, caring for his parents in 
their declining years, and after the death of 
his father traded for and bought the inter- 
ests of the other heirs, and succeeded to the 
farm, which comprises one hundred and sev- 
enty acres. After his marriage he located 
upon a part of the place, but a few years later 
returned to the parental roof that he might 
better care for his parents. He has since 
built a good house and barn and made many 
■ ■tiler useful and valuable improvements. 

On the 4th of November, 1852, in De- 
Witt county, was celebrated the marriage of 
Mr. Robb and Miss Uhoda Ann Baker, a 
native of Ohio, and a daughter of Samuel C. 
I'.aker, who came to this county in 1836, and 
was numbered among its pioneers. For 
forty years she was an invalid, and her suf- 
ferings ended in death July II, 1897. She 
was a devoted member of the Presbyterian 
church for forty-five years and hers was an 
ideal Christian life. Mr. Robb has two 
daughters: Mary L., wife of Charles L. 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



177 



Morris, of Elm Grove, Barnett township, 
this county; and Anna K.. who is now the 
widow of Charles M. Finfrock, and resides 

with her father. The latter had seven chil- 
dren, namely: Eva, who met death in a 
railroad accident. July [6, io<«>. when si 
enteen years of aye: Harrv R.; Ada; Edna: 
Alva: Leslie and Wilbur. 

In politics Mr. Robb was originally an 
old-line Whig, hut he supported Ahraham 
Lincoln for the presidency in [860, and has 
since been a stanch Republican, hut he has 
never cared f< >r i iffice. 1 le is a faithful mem- 
ber of the Presbyterian church, of Waynes- 
ville, and is a man highly respected and es- 
teemed by all who know him. He can re- 
late many interesting incidents of pioneer 
days, when this locality was almost an un- 
broken wilderness, and in the wonderful 
transformation that has since taken place he 

'; a very active part in early days. In 
September, 1899, he and his daughter had 
a most enjoyable trip through the east, visit- 
ing .id Independence Hall and other points 
of interest in Philadelphia, and also the 
cities of New York. Washington and other 
places along the Atlantic coast. He went to 
the top of Washington monument, where 
he had an elegant view of the capital city 
and the Potomac as its threads its way 
through most beautiful scenery down to the 
sea, also visiting Arlington Heights. .Mount 
Vernon and the mountain- of Tennessee and 
Virginia, coming home through Kentucky 
and crossing the Ohio nver at Cincinnati. 



STILLMAN A. CHAPIN. 

Stillman A. Chapin, one of the oldest 
living ami most highly respected pioneers 

of DeWitt count\. who is now passing his 



last years in ease and quiet at his home in 
DeWitt, was born on August [3, [821, in 

Madison county. Illinois, and i- a son of 
Hiram and Martha 1 Day 1 Chapin. By oc- 
cupation the father of our subject was a 
farmer ami in [819 came to this State and 
tir-t settled in Madison county and later re- 
moved to Sangamon county, hut the place 
where he settled is now in Menard county. 
Here he resided until 1828. In that year 
he came to this county and took up his resi- 
dence near Waynesville. Here he remained 
for a number of years and successfully en- 

i-d in his chosen occupation. In 1835 he 
removed to DeWitt township where he lived 
until 1S54. He died in McLean county in 
1871, :., enty-four years. In life he 

was successful, and on locating in this coun- 
ty he entered a number of acres of land, 
which he placed under a high state of culti- 
vation. In politics he was a Democrat and 
was called upon to till most of the township 
offices. 

The maternal grandfather of our sull- 
ied. Edward Day. was a soldier in the Rev- 
olutionary war. and came to this county with 
Hiram Chapin. where he resided until he 
was called to his final rest at the aye of sev- 
enty-seven years. His remains are buried in 
the DeWitt cemetery. 

Stillman A. Chapin, like most of the boys 
in those early days, received nothing more 
than a common-school education, but along 
the lines of work his training was not 
limited, and he early acquired the art of 
farming. Up to the time of his marriage 
he remained at home and gave his father the 
benefit of his services. His union with Miss 
S -an Larterty t. >ok place in [843. She is 
a daughter of Samuel Lal'ferty. who was a 
native of Virginia. Later in years he he- 
came an early settler of Ohio and in 1869 
he came to this state, where he died in 1872. 



278 



THE P.IOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



As a resull of the marriage of our subject 
his wife bore him the following children: 

John, who died in infancy; i _• ) Hiram, 
a resident of McLean county, a graduate of 
Rush Medical College, Chicago, and now 
engaged in the practice of his profession; 
Samuel, also a resident of McLean 
county, a graduate of Jefferson Medical Col- 
lege, Philadelphi in the prac- 
tice of medicine; i 4 ) Mary, now the widow 
of Thomas Cottingham; William and Finis, 
both deceased . (5) < harles, who is 
uate of Rush Medical College, Chicago, a 
practicing physician in Blooinington. 

In 1N4S or [849 our subject entered one 
hundred and sixty acre- of unimproved land 
in DeWitt township. This he placed under 
cultivation and also erected a good set oi 
farm buildings, including a line residence. 
Here he resided until 1856, when he traded 
for other land in the immediate vic'imtj 
on this he made his home until [864. Hav- 
ing sold this he next bought land near the 
village of DeWitt. where he resided until 
1S70. when he moved into the village of De- 
Witt, and here he has since resided. In con- 
nection with farming he was als< d in 
the raising of horses, cattle and hogs for 
market, and at one time he was interested in 
the mercantile business of the villi 

has always been a linn believer in the 
Democratic party and by that party he was 
elected to till the office of justice of the 
peace, which position he continued to till for 
almost thirty years. His first presidential 
vote was cast for lame- K. Polk. Frater- 
nally he is a member of the Masonic order 
of DeWitt. belonging to lodge No. 261, and 
i- now sen ing as chaplain. Religiously both 
he and his wife are active members of the 
Cumberland Presbyterian church. 

Mr. and Mrs. Chapin have the distinc- 
tion of being the two oldest living settlers 



of DeWitt township and are one of the old- 
est married couples in the county, having 
been married Eor fifty-eight year-. They 
are people of the highest respectability and 
count their friends by the score. 



CHARLES D. D< (WNING. 

This enterprising and progressive citizen 
of VVapella, who is now engaged in the grain 
business, was born on the old homestead 
farm near that village, Ma\ 2, [863, and be- 
longs to an old Kentucky family, his pa- 
ternal grandfather, Reason Downing, being 
a pioneer of Mason county, that state. Tl 
the lather, lame- E. Downing, was born 
Ma\ 22, 1823, and on reaching manhood 
was married there to Mis- Susan Downing, 
who was also a native of Mason county. 
Her grandfather, Timoth) Downing, who 
was one of the first settlers of that locality, 
took part in some of the frontier wars 
became a noted Indian fighter. In 1852 
father of our subject came to Illinois, and 

er farming for about a year in McLean 

inty, purchased eighty acres of land in 
Wapella township, DeWitt county, which 
he broke and improved, opening up a good 
farm. His first home here was a log house. 
in which he lived for several years, and he 
later built a good large residence. He add- 
ed to his landed posessions from time to 
time and becami the substantia] farm- 

er- and stock 1 of the county. His 

31 wife died in [868, and on the 2ist of 
1 vtober, 1869, he was united in marriage 
with Miss Elizabeth Best, also a native of 
Ma-011 county. Kentucky. lie died Janu- 
ary 31. 1884. honored and respected by all 
who knew him. By his first marriage he 
had seven children, five of whom reached 




C. D. DOWNING. 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



28f 



years "t" maturity, namely: Eleanor; 
Reason; Joseph, James T. and Charles D. 
The children by the second union were 
Elizabeth R., wife of S. J. McNutt, whose 
sketch appears elsewhere in this work; Besl 
and an infant daughter, deceased. 

During his boyhood Charles 1 >. Down- 
ing attended the home -«.]i< >■ »1 . and remained 
with his father until the later' s death, after 
which he had charge of the old farm for a 
few year-. lie was married in this county. 
September 28, [892, to Miss Mary 11. Mc- 
Nutt, a sister of S. J. McNutt, previously 
mentioned. She was born and reared in 
Kentucky. 

After his marriage, Mr. Downing lo- 
cated on a farm in Wapella township, where 
he owned one hundred and sixty acres of 
land, and he made many improvements upon 
the place, transforming it into a line farm 
with good buildings, a nice orchard and well 
tilled fields. In connection with farming 
he also engaged in raising and feeding grade 
and pure blooded polled Angus cattle and 

1 horses, and was accounted one of the 
most thrifty and enterprising agriculturists 
of his community. Renting his farm he 
removed to Wapella in [90b, and now has 
charge of the grain and coal business of the 
Roger Bacon & Company of Chicago, hav- 
ing control of their elevator there since 
.897. 

Mr. Downing has always given his po- 
litical support to the men and measures of 
the Democratic party, as did his father be- 
fore him. and he cast his first presidential 
ballot for Grover Cleveland, lie has been 
a delegate to county, congressional and state 
conventions, and for a number of years has 
been a member of the county central com- 
mittee, with which he i- still connected. 

He exerts considerable influence in the 
councils of his party, and ha- taken a 

13 



very active and prominent part in public 
affairs, lie served two consecutive terms 
o< count) supervisor, and while a member 

of the hoard he served on the finance, road 
and bridges and poor farm committees, 
lie was also township collector one term 
and a member of the school board several 
years. Mr. Downing i-^ a member of the 
Modern Woodmen of America and Royal 
Neighbors, fraternal insurance societies, 
and 1- one of the most popular and highly 
respected citizens of Wapella. 



WILLIAM 11. McFARLAND. 

William II. Mcbarland is one of Clin- 
ton's most highl) respected citi/ens. whose 
useful and well-spent life has not only gained 
for him the confidence of his fellow men 
but has also secured for him a comfortable 
competence, which enables him to lay aside 
all business cares and spend his declining 
days in ease and retirement. 

Mr. McFarland was born in Fayette 
county, Ohio, February [9, [832, and during 

boyh 1 was taken by his parents, Jesse and 

Lavina McFarland, to Marshall count). Illi- 
nois, where he was reared upon a farm. In 
early life he became interested in the grocery 
business at Wenona, this state, lie came 
to Clinton in [863 and in partner-hip with 
I 'aniel Wright, under the firm name of Mc- 
Farland & Wright, opened a general Sfc 
on the present site of Katz' clothing store. 
Three years later our subject sold out and 
-pent eleven year- a- a commercial traveler, 
lie next conducted a drug -tore .'lie year, 
and at the cud of that time formed a part- 
nership with J. 1). Rogers, under the firm 
name of McFarland & Rogers, in the furni- 
ture business. Shortly afterward he pur- 



282 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



chased Mr. Rogers' interest, and after being 
alone for a time he admitted Mr. Mcintosh 
to a partnership in the business, their store 
being where the firm of Lemon & Harris is 
now located. On disposing of his interest 
in the furniture business Mr. McFarland 
practically lived retired for seven years, but 
being of an active temperament he tired of 
this and in [888 embarked in the same line 
of trade with M. R. Colwell and Carl Jones, 
under the firm name of McFarland, Colwell 
& [ones. They carried on business together 
until the isi of September, [900, when Mr. 
McFarland sold his interest and has since 
lived retired. During the seven years lie 
previously spent in retiremem from active 
labor, lie engaged in the lire and life insur- 
ance business 1,1 a limited extent, and still 
does a little in the way of life insurance. In 
connection with Daniel Wright he built the 
brick residence adjoining his present In .me, 
and subsequent!) purchased Mr. Wright's 
interest in the place, making it his home for 
thirty years. He still owns the house, but 
* ten years ago built the handsome residence 
which has smce been his home. lie also 
erected the adjoining house on the east seven 
years ago. He owns other real estate, in- 
cluding the block now occupied by l.al'terty 
& Bosserman as a shoe store, erected by him 
in 1876 on the site of the old Mahan grocery. 
In 1892 he erected the tWO-Story brick block 
now occupied by Colwell & Jones. 

In [851 Mr. McFarland was united in 
marriage with Miss Eliza, daughter of Ira 
Wright, of Marshall county. Illinois, ami to 
them were born six children, all of whom are 
now deceased, namely: Sarah, who died at 
the age of thirty-three years; Ira, at the age 
of seven years; Curtis, at the age of five 
and a half years; Benjamin A., at the age of 
nineteen months; Clara Belle, in infancy; 
and William, at the age of one year. Sarah 



married Augustus V. Lisenby, who was born 
in this county and served several years as 
deputy clerk under his father. James Lisen- 
by, and later was elected county clerk two 
consecutive terms. Subsequently he went to 
Fresno, California, and is now cashier in 
the Fresno Savings Hank. He built a tine 
house east of Mr. McFarland, which is now 
owned by our subject, In politics he is a 
Democrat. For his second wife he married 
a niece of our subject's wife. Emma Wright, 
daughter of Daniel Wright, and to them has 
been In n'u < me s, ,11, t arl. 

In his political affiliations Mr. McFar- 
land is a Prohibitionist, being an earnest 
advocate of temperance principles. He has 
served as alderman of the city, but has never 
taken an important part in public affairs. 
Religiousl) he is an active and faithful mem- 
ber of the Methodist Episcopal church, in 
which he has served as class leader and in 
other official capacities; and socially is a 
member of the Odd fellows Lodge, En- 
campment and Rebekah Lodge, being past 
grand of the subordinate branch. During 
the long years of his residence in Clinton he 
has championed every movement designed 
to promote the general welfare, has support- 
ed every enterprise for the public g 1. and 

has materially aided in advancing the social 
and moral interests of the city. After a use- 
ful and honorable career he can well afford 
to lav aside all business cares and live in ease 
and retirement. 



GEORGE W. HELMICK. 

( )ne of Santa Anna township's most suc- 
cessful farmers and stock raisers js ( ieorge 
W. Helmick, whose entire life has been 
passed in DeWitt county. He was born in 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



'S3 



Rntledge township, on the 27th of August, 
1859, and i- a son of Elihu Helmick, whose 
sketch appear.-- elsewhere in this work, He 
grew to manhood on the home farm, and 
received the best of training in agricultural 
pursuits under the able direction of his fa- 
ther. He assisted in the work of the home 
farm until twenty-five years of age and then 
took charge of the place, carrying it on for 

years. With all the views of an ambi- 
tious young man. full of energy and life, lie 
entered largely into the stock business, and 
has successfully engaged in that pursuit ever 
since. He bought the Mickens farm, now- 
owned by Mr. Haynes, but after operating it 
two years he -old out and removed to Farm- 
er City, where he was engaged in the ice 
business for some time, being the only dealer 
in that commodity in the city. While resid- 
ing on the farm he also engaged in threshing 
and corn shelling. 

Disposing of hi- business there in 1895, 
Mr. Helmick purchased one hundred and 
twenty-three acres known as the C. H. Hud- 
dleston farm, and also bought an adjoining 
forty-acre tract known as the Crum farm, 
both being located in Santa Anna township. 
He has since enlarged the barn, built corn 
cribs and made other improvements, and in 
the 1 >perati' in 1 >f his land shi >w s that he is one 
of the most systematic and successful agri- 
culturists of his locality. He has a tine herd 
of thoroughbred Shorthorn and polled Dur- 
ham cattle, and is also breeding thorough- 
bred Poland China hogs. He is fast coming 
to the front as one of the most successful 
Stock-feeders in the county, and in all his 
undertakings he has steadily prospered, be- 
ing a man of more than ordinary business 
ability and sound judgment. 

Mr. Helmick was married October 29, 
1885. to Miss 1.' mine Fuller, a daughter of 
Daniel Fuller, and they have one child. Min- 



nie May, who vvas born in Rutledge town- 
ship, September 2, [889. After attaining 
his majority Mr. Helmick voted the Demo- 
cratic ticket for some time, but is now a 
standi supporter of the Prohibition party, 
having always been a strong temperance 
man. In [899 he united with the Methodist 
Episcopal church, of which he is now an 
active member and steward of the same. 



FLOYD C. SHEPHERD. 

The family of which our subject. Floyd 
C. Shepherd, is a worthy descendant., orig- 
inated many generation- ago in Ireland, 
some members of it coming to America and 
locating in Kentucky about 1792. Grandfa- 
ther Louis Shepherd, a native of Kentucky, 
engaged in farming in that state, and 
became known as a successful stock-raiser. 
In 1829 he moved to Morgan county, Illi- 
nois, and was one of the pioneer settler-. 
There he died, leaving a family of six chil- 
dren, five boys and one girl. 

Francis Shepherd, who was a son of 
Louis and the father of our subject, was b >m 
in Morgan county. Illinois. February 
[833, and there grew to manhood on a farm 
and married Clementine Wilmore March S, 
[857. Her death occurred on the 1 2th day 
of December. [860. Floyd C. her only child, 
wa- born November 10. [860. Following 
this Mr. Shepherd enlisted August 15. 1862, 
Company F, < Ine Hundred and Twenty-sec- 
ond Infantry Volunteers of Illinois, for serv- 
ice in the Civil war. faithfully performing 
his duty until its close. He participated in 
the battle- of barker'- CrOss Roads. Ten- 
>see, December ,^. [862; Tupelo, Missis- 
sippi. July 14. [864; Nashville, Tennessee, 
December 15-10. 1864, and also siege of 



284 



Mil-: BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



Fort Blakeley and Mobile, Alabama. He 
was discharge at Mobile, Alabama, July 15. 
[865, and mustered out at Springfield, II 
line >is. '- ugust 4, [8l 15. 

After his return from the army Mr. 
Shepherd engaged in various lines, both in 
DeWitt and in Macoupin counties. Janu- 
ary 27, 1 Si .7, in the- latter county, he v 
married to Miss Kate 1. Cobb, of Lawrence 
burg, Kentucky. In [868 Mr. Shepherd 
moved to Franklin county, Kansas. There 
lie engaged in farming and stock raising un- 
til [895, when lie removed to Richmond, 
Kansas, where he and wife lived a retired 
life, no children having been born ol this 
marriage. 

Floyd C. Shepherd was horn in Harp 
township, DeWitt county, Illinois, and after 
(he untimely death of his young mother, he 
was taken to the home of his grandparents, 

James P. and Martha Wilmore. The) were 
natives of Virginia, but came to DeWitt 
county in [846, and settled in what is now 
known as Harp township, and here engaged 
for many years in farming, he dying in 
1S77. while his wife passed away in 1873. 
11. »yd Shepherd grew to manhood in DeWitt 
county, remaining their comfort and sup- 
port until their death, when he returned to 
his father in Kansas, and resided with him 
for one half years, at the expiration 

of that time returning to DeWitt county, 
where he received his schooling. 

Mr. Shepherd began t" depend entirely 
up' m his own resources at an early age. I le 
began t<> engage in farm work in the locality 
where he was well known, being emplo; 
first by J. M. Britton, and continued in this 
line until [882. However, during the win 
ters the work mi the farm is almost suspend- 
ed, and in 1879 Mr. Shepherd began to teach 
during this season, through ('reek and Mai"]) 



townships, and succeeded so well that he 
continued in this profession until [895. 

In 1883 he moved into Lane Creek town- 
ship ami for two years was engaged in the 
tile business with Lane & Thompson, and 
also engaged in [arming and stock raising 
in Harp township after his marriage, which 
took place the next year. In [895 he began 
buying grain, dealing fur himself, hut later 
he located in liirkhcck and entered into ne- 
gotiations which resulted in his being made 
rent in this line for the great linn of 
Rogers, Bacon Company, of Chicago. 

I he marriage of Mi-. Shepherd was on 
March [3, [884, t<> Miss \11na Ik Lane, 
who was horn in (reek township, and who 
was a daughter of Jeremiah and Mary Ann 
Lane. This family was one of the. old ones 
111 the county, and came from Tennessee. 
Mrs. Shepherd was one of eighl children 
horn to her parents, and was the sixth in or- 
der of birth, the survivors being: Cicero, 
who lives in Sullivan, Illinois: Sarah, the 
wife of Edward Danjson, lives in Lane: 
Margaret, the w ife of M . ( '. I )avenpi >rt, lives 
in (reek township; William lives in Lane. 
The children horn to Mr. and Mrs. Shep- 
herd are two bright, intelligent school boys, 
Wilson Epler, who was born on June ~j, 
[885, and Benjamin Otto, who was horn 
( (ctober 20, [886. 

In politics Mr. Shepherd is a Democrat 
and has served fout terms as supervisor and 
has keen a member of a number of important 
committees in the township, and has efficient- 
ly held every township office, except that of 
constable, lie is a frequent delegate to the 
various political conventions and has been an 
e member • if his party. 

Socially Mr. Shepherd is connected with 
the order M. W. A.. Clinton ( lamp, X". ,}"4- 
He is a leading member of the Christian. 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RED >KD. 






church of Clinton, in which he is a deacon 
ami a liberal supporter. Mr. Shepherd nuns 
one hundred and thirteen aero of land on 
and 29, and i- regarded as one 
of the substantial men of this locality. lli> 
siness brings him into association with 
many, and he is noted for his honesty in 

dealing, as well as his g 1 judgment in 

buyii g 



WILLIAM II. TAYLOR. 

William II. Taylor, who is one of Clin- 
ton's representative citizens and a popular 
traveling salesman, was horn on the 4th of 
June. 1836, in Muskingum county. Ohio, 
and is a son of Henry and Mary E. ( Miller 1 
Taylor. History records 'hat there were 
four brothers of the Taylor family who came 
to this country from Scotland, one locating 
in Pennsylvania, another in Delaware, and 
the third in Virginia, while the fourth, be- 
ing a sea captain, was lost at sea. Nathaniel 
Taylor, our subject's paternal grandfather, 
was a son of the one who settled in Dela- 
ware. He married arid throughout life fol- 
lowed farming. 

Henry Taylor, our subject's father, was 
horn in Delaware and in early life emigrated 
!•• ( >hio, where he wedded Miss Mary E. 
Miller, a native of Pennsylvania. In 1853 
they came to Clinton. Illinois, which was 
then a small town, and in company with 
Henry and I I Jell and Henry Lutzen- 

barger, Mr. Taylor purchased the vacant 
Corner where the Magill House now stands. 
and erected a large two-story frame build- 
ing, which they Stocked with general mer- 
chandise, being Successfully engaged in busi- 
ness there until 1857, when a tire destroyed 
their store and its contents. Later Mr. 
Taylor, in partnership with A. J. Blackford, 



rented a building and again embarked in 

merchandising, under the linn name of Tay- 
lor & Blackford, but dining the panic of 
[873 they failed ami he again lost every- 
thing. Nothing daunted, however, be opened 
a small coal office, where our subject's son, 
Walter, is now carrying on business, and his 
son, Fletcher, became associated with him in 
1880 and later succeeded to the business. 
He was a strong man. Imth physically and 
mentally, and although he twice met with 
misfortune in business he always gave lib- 
erally of his means to all enterprises tor the 
public good. His fellow citizens recogniz- 
ing his worth ami ability called upon him 
to till many official positions. Both he and 
his wife were active members of the Meth- 
odist Episcopal church, and were highly re- 
spected and esteemed by all who knew them. 
He died in 1891, at the age of seventy-seven 
years, and she departed this life in [898, 
when over eighty years of age. 'Their chil- 
dren were George; William IT: Samuel K.; 
Mary E. ; Homer 1!.; John T.. who died in 
infancy; Fletcher C. : a daughter who died 
in infancy: Frank X. : and Annie. 

William H. "Taylor, of this review, came 
to Clinton with his parents, and assisted his 
father in business until 1857, when he 
opened a shoe store in the rear of his father's 
place of business. After the fire which de- 

pyed their property, he formed a partner- 
ship with Mr. Toury, and carried on the 
same line of business until after the Civil 
war broke out. In [86i Mr. 'Taylor enlisted 
in Company F, Forty-first Illinois Volunteer 
Infantry, and was promoted to second lieu- 
tenant in March. [862, and to first lieutenant 
on the 1st of l Kt' 'her of the same year, after 
which he served as adjutant of the r< 
ment. He was in the service three years and 
one month. Being si\ feet in height, broad 
shouldered and of line physique, his was a 



286 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



ci immanding figure, and lie made a hand- 
some officer. Those who served under him 
still speak in glowing terms i if their first lieu- 
tenant. 

On his return from the war Mr. Taylor 
again engaged in the general store business 
until [872, when he went upon the road as 
a traveling salesman for the grocery house 
of Harmon, Merrian & Company of Chica- 
go, which since the death of Mr. Harmon 
lias become Merrian, Collins & Dexter. 
During the years thai have since passed Mr. 
Taylor has remained in their employ, hav- 
ing now been with them almost a quarter of 
a century. In [868 the Magill Brothers 
built what is known as the Magill House, 
which i^ a large three-Story brick structure 
on North (enter street, extending from the 
square to Washington street. This our sub- 
ject bought in [898, and has since remod- 
eled and enlarged it by building a thirty-two- 
Fool addition on the west. Ii is to-day a 

g 1 modern hotel— the best in the city. 

For his home he purchased the Coverdale 

propertj at [OO6 Easl .Main street, which is 
a beautiful place, the elegant residence being 
surrounded by wide lawns, shady dri . 
lovely trees and shrubs. His first home was 
on the corner of Washington and Jackson 

streets. 

Mr. Taylor has been twice married, his 
first wife being Lucy, daughter of James 
II. Merill, and to them were horn three 
children: Walter M.. whose sketch appears 
elsewhere in tins volume; Emma, whii died 
young: and Lula. who died in infancy. The 
wife and mother died in 1S73. at the age of 
thirty-four years. In 1875 Mr. Taylor mar- 
ried Miss Jennie Renick, by whom he also 
had three children: Xellie married Dr. 
Charles Bogardus, a prominent physician of 
Clinton, ami died in 1901, at the age of 
twenty-five years. She was one of the lead- 



ing young ladies of the city and very pop- 
ular. William H. enlisted in 1900 as a pri- 
vate in Company 1), Thirteenth United 
States Regiment, and is now serving at 
Dangupon, Philippines Islands. Edward 
M. was also in the service, enlisting at Den- 
ver, Colorado, in May, [898, in the First 
Colorado Infantry, at the first call for troops 
t.. In- sent to Manilla. With his regiment 
he started for San Francisco, May 17. and 
on the 14th of June, on the steamer China, 
for Honolulu. On the 4th t>f July they 
stopped at Wakes Island, where General 
Green ami Colonel Hill planted the United 
States flag, and fourteen days later 
landed at Camp Dewey, on the Island of 
Luzon, seven miles from the city of Manilla. 
There they began throwing up entrench- 
ments within one hundred and twenty-five 
yards of the enemy's lines. They took part 
in the famous battle of Manilla, and the bat- 
tles of Hesty, Manquena, Antapelo and I'ar- 
anaque, besides many skirmishes, being un- 
der fire iii' -1 ' if the time. < >n the 4th 1 if 
July, itjoo. they received orders at Manilla 
ii' embark for home, and arrived at San 
Francisco on the toth of August. Edward 
M. Taylor was mustered out on the 8th of 
the following September and returned home. 
In 1901 he opened a grocery store in Clin- 
ton, in connection with his brother Walter 
II.. and is now conducting 'he same. He 
can relate main thrilling experiences of his 
life in the Philippines, which if written 
would make a very fascinating book. 

Fraternally Mr. Taylor is a member of 
Lodge No. 84, F. & \. M., of which he was 
master three terms, and was a member and 
high priest of the Chapter. He is now serv- 
ing as trustee of the Methodist Episcopal 
church, with which the family have been 
connected for several generations, and have 
always been active church workers. Our 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 






subject lias never cared for office, but lias 
always taken a commendable interest in all 
enterprises calculated to advance the welfare 
of the city which has now been In* borne for 
almost fifty yeai 



JOHN VV. FOSTER. 

John W. Foster, who is now so suc- 
tlly conducting the county farm of De- 
Witt county, in Barnett township, was horn 
in Logan county, Illinois, on the 6th of 
March. 1 84' .. and i> a representative of one 
of the early families of New Jersey. There 
his paternal grandfather, William 1 
was born, reared and married, and later re- 
moved to Ohio, but he subsequently re- 
turned to his native state, where his death 
occurred. A. J. Foster, the father of our 
subject, was horn in Xew Jersey hut was 
1 in Ohio, and there married Mis< 
Eleanor Morgan, a native of that state. At 
an early day they removed to M 
county. Illinois, where they were numbered 
ami ing the pioneers, and fri 'in there went 
to Logan county, where the father, whi 
a miller by trade, owned and operated "i 
flouring mill six miles west of Atlanta. In 
he took up his residence in Wapella 
township. DeWitt county, and devoted his 
attentii >n t> > farming there and in Tun- 

1 2 t. iwnship throughout the remainder 
of his life. 

The subject of this review was prin- 
cipally reared in this county, and educate! 
in its common • - After reaching 

manhood he was in the employ of the lib- 
eral Railroad for two years, but 
with that exception his life has been mainly 
devoted to agricultural pursuits. Receiv- 
ing the appointment as superintendent of 



the county poor farm, he took charge of the 
place on the i-t of January. 1900, and has 
since given his entire time and attention to 
it* management with most gratifying re- 
sults. On two different occasions during 
his incumbency the honorable county board 
has made a thorough examination of the 
way affair* have been conducted upon the 
farm, and all have been greatly pleased with 
the present management, believing that they 
have found the right man for the rig 
place. 

On the 25th of November, [875, in this 
county. Mr. Foster was united in marriage 
with Miss Elva Metz, a native of Pike coun- 
ty. Illinois, and a daughter of J. 1',. Met/. 
who is now a resident of Wapella. She 
died in 1804. leaving two children: Ruth- 
erford, who subsequently died at the age of 
seventeen years: ami Ambrose, who assists 
his father in the management of the county 
farm. Mr. Foster was again married in 
Logan county, in 1S0O. his second union 
being with Mi^ Emma Wingate, who was 
born in that county. Her father was Dr. 
Wingate, who died in Kansas. The only 
child born <>f our subject's second man-. 
died in infancy. 

By his ballot Mr. Foster has always been 
stanch supporter of the men and m< 
ures of tlie Democracy. He was made an 
( )<h\ Fellow in Wapella Lodge, with which 
he still holds membership. His wife i- .1 
member of the Christian church, and both 
have the respect and esteem of all who know 
them. 



J. HENRY A. BLOME. 

This well-known cigar manufacturer of 
Clinton. Illinois, was born in the province 
of Hanover. Germany, in [857, and in 1N71 



288 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



came to the United States with his parents. 
Frederick and .Mary (Honfelt) Blonie. 
The family 1. .rated at Ear'lville, [llinois, 
where the father engaged in railroading and 
farming. There he died in [885, at the 
age of lift} .irs. and his wife, who 

long survived him. passed away in [901, 
at the age of seventy two. They had four 
children: Dora, Rudolph, J. Henry A. and 
Elizabeth. 

The subject of this sketch had learned 
the cigarmaker's trade in his native land. 
but on first coming t" America he followed 
farming for a short time- lie then worked 
at his trade as a journeyman until [886, 
when he came to Clinton and started a fac- 
tory of his own on a small scale, with only 
one man to assist him. lie sold his goods 
to the townspeople and was careful to make 
a cigar that would please. At first he car- 
ried on husini-ss in a rented place, hut was 
at length able to purchase the Nancj Mann 
property at 216 Easl Main street, and after 
remodeling the residence tor his home he 
erected a building on the rear of the lot for 
business purposes, llis trade has steadily 
increased, and he now furnishes emplo - 
menl to four men. llis leaders are Espanol 

and Ringlets — two g 1 five-cent cigars, 

which are widely sought, and there is no 
cigar for the price on the market which ex- 
cels the Espanol. His favorite ten-cent 
cigar is the Royal Prince. Mr. Blome sells 
principally to the local trade. His factor) 

is No. 34- 

Mr. Blome married Miss Louisa M. 
Kern, a daughter of Michael Kern, of 
Dwight, Livingston county. Illinois, and to 
them have been born three children: Fred- 
erick M.. George and Albert 11. Frater- 
nally he is an honored member of the In- 
dependent Order of odd fellows, the 
Knights of Pythias, the Modern Woodmen 



of America, the Court of Honor and the 
Protective League, and has held office in 
some of these orders. He is what the world 
terms a self-made man, his success in life 
being due entirely to his own industry, per- 
severance and a determination to succeed. 



TILLMON LANE. 



In the pioneer epoch in the historj ol 
this section of Illinois. Tilhnon Lane came 
to DeWitt county, and has been an import- 
ant factor in its substantial development and 
permanent improvement. He located here 
in [835 and in the work of progress he has 
c\ er In irne his part. 

'litis worthy pioneer was horn in Monroe 
county. Kentucky, on the 14th of October, 
[823, and comes of good old Revolutionary 
stock, his maternal grandfather having aid- 
id the colonies in their struggle for hide 
pendence. His father. Ezekiel Lane, was 
born in Tennessee, hut at an early day re 
moved to Kentucky, where he married Miss 
Telithea Guest, who was also a native of 
Tennessee, and when young removed with 
her parents to Kentucky, the family being 
among the firsl settlers of that state. In 
[827, when our subjeel was only four years 
old, Ezekiel Lane brought his family to Illi- 
nois, and located in Hamilton county, where 
he engaged in farming for eight years. In 
[835 he took up his residence in what is now 
( reek township, DeM'itt county, hut at that 
time formed a part of Macon county. He 
took up the land on which the village of 
Lane now stands, entering this tract at the 
land office in Danville. Illinois, and paying 
one dollar and a quarter per acre for the 
same. He devoted a part of his time to the 
work of the ministry, being one of the first 




TILMON LANE. 




MRS. TILMON LANE. 



THK BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 






preachers of the New Light church to locate 

in thi> state. He died in 1853, at thi 
fifty-two years, and his wife in [846, at the 

of forty-two years. They were the par- 
ent- of seven children, who reached mature 
irs, and four of the family are still liv- 
ing, namely: Tillmon, of this review: 
William 1!.. who is represented mi another 
page of this volume; Marinda, a resident of 
Nebraska; and Polly Ann. wife of Jerry 
Lane, of Lane, Illinois. 

For a short time during his boyhood 
Tillmon Lane pursued his studies in the sub- 
scription schools of Hamilton county. The 
old school house was built of 1> >!^s with a 
puncheon floor, greased paper windows, and 
hewed log benches. Here he was a student 

a few weeks during the winter. After 
the removal of the family to DeWitt county 
he spent six months in school on Rock Creek, 
about two miles east of Waynesville, which 
was really a good school for those days. 
This completed his education with the excep- 
tion of a week of study in a school located 
about two miles from his home in Creek 
township. At that time there were no roads 
in this locality, and in going t. > and from 
school lie would have to break his own way 
through the snow and brush. 

Mr. Lane was reared to farm work, and 
remained at home until twenty-one years of 

when he entered eighty acres 1 if land in 

■k township at the land office in Dan- 
ville, it requiring three days to make the 
trip. In 1N47 he laid the first government 
land warrant entered at that place, it being 
a Mexican war land warrant. In 1847 and 
1848 Mr. Lane broke forty acres of his land 
and built a one-room house, sixteen by 
eighteen feet, besides fencing his land. I 
his first crop of wheat he received fifty-seven 
cents per bushel, selling the first crop at 
Clinton for one hundred and fifty dollar-. 



which was the most mone) up 

to that time. Later he hauled 1 lels 

of wheat to Chicago, which was then a -mall 
town and a veritable mudhole. This trip 
consumed twelve days. A- he prospered in 
his farming operation- he added more land 
to the original purchase and to-day owns 
three hundred acres, having sold one hun- 
dred acres in lots which now form the town 
■ I Lane. This place was laid out in 1873, 
and he has since made two additions. Mr. 
Lane ha- engaged in general fanning hut 
has devoted his attention principally to the 
raising of cattle and hog-. Since 1873 he 
has also been interested in grain buying, and 
in [898 was made agent for the Middle Di- 
vision Grain Company at Lane. 

On the 15th of November, 1848, Mr. 
Lane married Miss Elizabeth Thompson, 
who was horn in Kentucky, of which state 
her parents. Jeremiah and Nancy Thomp- 
son, were also natives. During her infancy 
the family removed to Sangamon county, 
Illinois, and in the fall of [836 came to De- 
Witt county, locating in what is now Creek 
township, where Mr. Thompson took up 
g eminent land and engaged in farming. 
Both he and his wife lived to a ripe old age, 
he dying at the age of eighty-six years, audi 
she when about eight}- years of age. 

Unto Mr. and Mrs. Lane were born 
children, as follows: 1 1 1 James ck- 

dealer, shipping to Chicago and Blooming- 
ton market-, married Mis- Susanna Graham, 
ami they have six children, namely: \\"lhy. 
Una, Lizzie'. Tillmon, Ruth and Montgom- 
ery; ( _' ) Ellen, who married David Lark' 
of Creek township, and died, le ice 

children, namely: lame-. Ona, Nathan, 
Noble and Ira; (3) Martha, who is the wife 
of George Gibson, of Forrest City, Mason 
county. Illinois; 14) Jane, deceased, was the 
wife of Harvey Graham, of Creek town- 



294 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



ship; (5) Richard, who has charge of the 
grain business for his father at Lane. He 
married Erne Luttrell, and they have one 
child. French; (6) Jerimah, residing on one 
of Mr. Lane's farms, is married to Miss Nel- 
lie Roberts; (7) Ezekiel, a resident of Ne- 
braska, and a farmer by occupation; (8) 
William, a farmer, and now a resident of 
Lane. Lelander and John J. are both de- 
ceased. 

Mrs. Lane, who was a consistent mem- 
ber of the Christian church, died February 
21, [884, and was laid to rest in the Lisenby 
cemeter} of Creek township. For his second 
wife .air subject married Mrs. Sarah Mc- 
Aboy, \\i«l<'\\ of Benjamin McAboy, of 
Creek township. 

For alm>>st half a century Mr. Lane has 
been an active and prominent member ol the 
Christian church, and ha- been officially con- 
nected with it for many years, lie 1 
member of Delphi Lodge, X". 84, F. & A. 
M., of Clinton, and 1- a stanch supporter of 
the Democratic part) and it- principles. He 
ha.- served a number of term-, a- supervisor, 
and was a member of many important com- 
mittees, including those -elected to purchase 

.1 -ite f^r the 1 r farm and sell the swamp 

lands (if the county. In [872 he was elected 
to the general assembly, and was a member 
.if that body when the statutes of the state 
were revised. Through the sixty-six years 
of his residence in He Witt county Mr. Lane 
has become widely known and his many ex- 
cellent traits of character have gained him 
the high regard of main friend-. Hi 
witnessed almost the entire development of 
the county and has taken a very prominent 
part in it- improvement. When he located 
in Creek township there were but fifty acres 
of land under cultivation within its borders, 
and there were no roads and fences. Game 
of all kinds was plentiful, and a number of 



Indians were still here. In early days Mr. 
Lane bought stock all over central Illinois, 
and rode hundreds of miles on horseback 
Over the wild prairies. 



l-.l.l HUGH l« IBB. 



Among DeWitt county's honored pio 
lieers none are more deserving of mention 
in this volume than the gentleman whose 
name introduces this sketch, and who i- now 
living a retired life in Clinton, lie was 
horn in Maury county. Tennessee, July 27, 
[825, and is of Irish descent, hi- paternal 
grandfather having been a native of the 
Emerald Isle. His father. John Robb, was 
horn near Charleston, West Virginia, and 
-pent hi- early life as a planter in Ken- 
tucky, where he married Mi— Barbara Rob- 
inson, lie then removed to Maun county, 

nessee, where he became owner 01 
small farm and engaged in agricultural pur- 
suits. Selling his place for four hundred 
dollar-, he started for Illinois. May 3, iS-'O, 
with two yoke of oxen, accompanied bj 
wife and ten children. On their arrival in 
DeWitt county he took up a tract of eighty 
acre- of government land, now owned by 
his son Joseph. He was one of the earliest 
settlers of the county, and suffered all of the 
hardships and privations incident to pioneer 
life. His first home here w a- a rude log 
cabin, which was subsequently replaced by 

;, g 1 hewed-log house, where he reared 

his family around the old-fashioned fire- 
place. At that time it took two or three 
days to go to mill and market. As the 
years passed he prospered in his new home, 
and at the time of his death owned four 
hundred and fifty-five acres of land. His 
children were: James R., Samuel H., Will— 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



295 



i;mi K.. Elilm. Thomas C, Elizabeth G., 
Isabel, Mary Jane and Lovina C., all 1>< >ra 
in Ten- s nd Joseph, G id John, 

born in this county. All readied man anil 
womanhood with the exception of Isabel, 
who died at the aye of seventeen years. 

Mr. Robb, of this review, spent his boy- 
hood and youth on the home farm, and on 
leaving the parental mot. at the aye of 
twenty-two years, rented his brother's farm, 
which lie Operated until three years after his 
marriage, and then bought one hundred and 
- of land in Barnett township, 
which he greatly improved and still owns. 
He continued to carry on farming until 
?93, when he rented his place and removed 
to Clinton, where he is now living a retired 
life, enjoying a well-earned n 

In 184S Mr. Robb married Mi-s Clarissa 
B. Lanter. who was lx.ni eight miles west of 
Springfield. Illinois. April 14. 1827, ami is a 
daughter of Rev. Peter and Eliza I.. 1 Pivi- 
ner t Lanter. By this union were horn the 
following children: 1 1 1 James H. married 
Margaret J. Martin and has three children. 
Samuel E., Marie E. and James 0. - - 
Charles E. married Harriet D. Lynce and 
has one daughter. Helen M. (3) Peter 
married Dora Bradley and has two sons, < ■. 
Lester and Thomas B. 141 Perry R. wed- 
ded Mary Boyce and has >ix children: Al- 
bert Ferrill, Clarissa A., Ruby D.. Luella 
and Pearl. (5) Julia B. is deceased. (6) 
Ida May is the wife of Henry Teal and has 
six children: Maud. Chester, Lester, Jo- 
seph, Florence and Nellie. (7) Samuel P. 
maried Lena Morse and has one child. Roger 
K. (8) Luella F. is the wife of C. Britten 
and has one daughter, Lura I'. 

Mr. Robb i- a stanch supporter of the 
Republican party, and for the long period of 
fifty-four years has been a faithful and con- 
sistent member of the Presbvterian church. 



He has never used profane language, to- 
bacco or liquor, and is a most exemplary 

Chri-tian gentleman, who commands the re- 

spect and confidence of all who know him. 



JAMES A. FOSNAUGH. 

Among the leading merchants and rep- 
resentative business men of Clinton, lllii 
i> James A. Fosnaugh, proprietor of one of 
the best general st> ire> 1 »f the place. 1 le 
horn in Fairfield county. Ohio, September 
I'). [848, a son of Ezra and Eliza 1 Bushee) 
Fosnaugh. His paternal grandfather 
Jacob Fosnaugh, who was horn in Penn- 
sylvania of German ancestry, and who 
a farmer by occupation. He was twice mar- 
ried and by the first union had six children, 
namely: Eli, Noah, Amos, Edward, Mrs. 
Eliza Swarts and Mrs. Lape. The children 
by the second marriage were Hiram. La- 
fayette. Cornelius. Jerome, Archibald, Ade- 
line and Artemes he maternal grand- 
father of our subject was Jacob Busl 
who was of French descent, and lived to be 
over eighty yea:- His children were 
Maria. Martha. Mary. Eliza, John and Jesse. 

In 1856 the father of our subject came 
to Illinois and located on a farm in Piatt 
county, where he spent the remainder of his 
life, dying there I October 1. iNj,}. at the age 
of forty-nine years. His wife, who was a 
native of Fairfield county. Ohio, died in 
m 'i. at the aye of seventy years. They 
were the parents ,,f eight children: Jar 
A., of this review; Salina, wife of George 
McCabe; Theodore, a resident of Spring- 
field, Illinois; Europe, of Lane. Mini 
Eiifus, of Piatt county: Dora Alice, wife of 
William Dungen; Laura Belle, wife of I. 
Dilsaver, of White Heath; and Irvin. of 
I Kcatur. 



296 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



The subject of this sketch was only eight 
rs old on the removal of the .family to 
Piatt county, Illinois, and he grew to man- 
hood '>n the home farm, his education being 
acquired in an old time log school house, 
where he pursued his studies until fifteen 
pears of age. During the following ten 
vcars he engaged in farming, and then en 
tered the employ of the Indianapolis, Bloom- 
ington & Western Railroad, being appointed 
station agent at Lane, DeWitt county, in 
[875, and filling that position for three and 

half years. In 1878 he opened a g 
eral store at that place as successor to the 
firm of Nilson & Kidder, and also built the 
residence known to-daj as the Ed Danison 
home. Later he opened a branch store at 
DeWitt, which he conducted for a year and 
a halt', and then, in 1NN7. removed his stock 
1 if goi »ls fn in that place to ( llinton. Leav- 
ing his bn ither Eun >pe in charge 1 >t the si, ire 
at Lane, he has since given his personal at- 
tention t" his lmsiness in t llinton. He 1 
ries a large and w< d stock 1 >1 dry- 

goods, l)i h.is. shu/s, groceries, in fact every- 
thing found in a first-class general store.and 

lias built up an excellent trade, lie began 
mercantile business on a capital of eight hun- 
dred dollars saved from his hard earned 
salary, hut being energetic, enterprising and 
industrious, he has prospered, and is to- 
day one of the besl rated merchants of the 
County. lie is also connected with tin' 

electric light plant. As a home, he bought 
the Kelly residence, which he has since 
greatly impri >\ ed. 

In [872 Mr. Fosnaugh was united in 
marriage with Miss Kitty Cunningham, a 
native of New York city, who lost her par- 
ents in childhood and was reared and edu- 
cated by James Wade, of Worcester. Massa 
chusetts. She is a handsome woman of 

high social qualities and verj popular, being 



a leader in society. By this union were horn 
four children: Rovenia, now the wile ol 
A. 1-". .Miller, state's attorney of DeWitt 
county; Irwin !•".., who is his father's assist- 
ant; Austin, who is studying law with A. 
I". Miller; and Lee, who is also with his 
lather in the si, ire. 

Fraternally, Mr. Fosnaugh is a member 
of the Knights of Pythias, and politically is 
a supporter of the Democratic party. While 
a resident of Lane he served as justice of 
the peace four years, lie is not only one of 
the leading business men of Clinton, hut is 
a public-spirited citizen who is thoroughly 
interested in whatever tends to promote the 
moral, intellectual and material welfare of 
the ci immunity. 



FRANCIS CUNNINGHAM. 

The subject of this sketch, who has 
passed the Psalmist's span of life of three 
score years and ten. is now living retired 
with his son, C. F. Cunningham, upon the 
old homestead on section 17. Wapcll.t town- 
ship, lie was horn in Washington county. 
Pennsylvania, August 31, 1830, and is a 
son of William Cunningham, of Washing- 
ton county, Pennsylvania, lie was edu- 
ed in the common schools near his boy- 
hood home, and assisted his mother in 
carrying on the farm until reaching man's 
estate. 

In [853 Mr. Cunningham first came to 
DeWitt county, Illinois, and purchased 
eighty acres of land on section 17. and 
twelve aires of timber land on section 21, 
Wapella township, hut did not locate there- 
on until the following spring. There was 
an old frame house upon the place and a 
portion of the land hail been broken, To 




FRANK CUNNINGHAM. 




MRS. FRANK CUNNINGHAM. 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



3° r 



its further improvement and cultivation he 
;it i •nee turned his attention, erecting u; « »« •• 1 
and substantial buildings and placing the 
entire tract under cultivation. lie a 
added to his original tract until he had one 
hundred and sixty-four acres <>t" rich and 
arable land, and continued its cultivation 
for many years. For some time he made 
his home in Heyworth, but is now living 
a retired life on the old homestead, enjoy- 
ing a well earned rest. lie yet owns a 
dwelling house and t\\<> lots, and also a liv- 
ery barn and one lot in Heyworth. 

In Randolph township. McLean county, 
Mr. Cunningham was married in 1856 to 
Miss charity Gossard, a native of R 
county, Ohio, and a daughter of John and 
Elizabeth Gossard, who came t" Illinois 
about 1855 and settled in McLean county. 
By this union were born nine children, of 
whom the following named are still living: 
John married Emma Burton and resi< 
in California: William married Delia 
Honey and lives in Nebraska; May is the 
wife of John Wykle of Denver. Colorado: 
Lou is the wife of Lean Williams of De- 
Witt county, llinois; Charles married Ella 
Baker and is now operating the old home 
farm: George married Jessie Hedrick and 
i- engaged in the livery business in Hey- 
worth, Illinois; Fred is a farmer of Mc- 
Lean comity, and is married to Xettie 
Brock; and Ed is at home and is married to 
Eva Jackson; and Eva, died when about 
one year old. The mother <>i the family 
passed away in [891, and was laid to rest 
in Sugar Grove cemetery. DeWitt county. 
She was a member of the Methodist Epico- 
pal church. 

Politically Mr. Cunningham ha- been a 
life-long Democrat, and has supported ev- 
ery presidential candidate of that party 
since voting for James Buchanan in [856. 



He was a member of the Methodist 1' 
pal church at Sugar and i- a man 

highly respected and esteemed by all who 
know him. 



J< >SEPH DIETRICH. 

Prominent among the German-American 

citizens residing in DeWitt county is this 
well-known and thrifty fanner whose home 

is on section 33, Barnett township. He was 
born July 26, 1841, in Baden, Germany, of 

which place his parents. Michael and Jo 
sephine 1 Pikel) Dietrich, were also natives. 

In [857 the family emigrated to America 
and settled in Sangamon county. [Him 
where the father died shortly afterward, 
The children were then reared by the mother 
in that county. 

There Joseph Dietrich grew to manhood 
with limited educational advantages as he 
had but little opportunity to attend school. 
He is therefore almost wholly a self-edu- 
cated as well as a self-made man. After 
leaving home he worked by the month as a 
farm hand for several years, and then com- 
menced fanning for himself upon rented 
land. His time was thus passed in San- 
gamon county until 1N74. when he removed 
to Logan county and operated a farm near 
Lincoln for over twentj In [894 he 

removed to Barnett township, DeWitt coun- 
ty, where he had previously purchased the 
farm of one hundred and sb'.ty acres which 
he now owns and occupies. This is now 
under a high state of cultivation and well 
improved with good and substantial build- 
ings. 

In Sangamon county, March 4. [869, 
was celebrated the marriage of Mr. Dietrich 
and Miss Elizabeth I Messier, who was Ix.rn 
in Bayer, Germany, and in [861 came to the 



302 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



new world with her parents, George and 
Valentine Pressler, who spent their last days 
in Sangamon county, Illinois. There Mrs. 
Dietrich was reared, making her home in 
Springfield for several years. To our sub- 
ject and his wife were horn ten children, live 
sons and five daughters, namely: Joseph 
and George, both farmers of Macon county, 
Illinois; Jacob, a resident of towa; John 
and Henry, who are now carrying on the 
home farm; Mary Louisa, who is now ke 
ing house for her brother George; Elizabeth, 
wife of Anton Farlow, of Springfield; 
Emma, wife of George Bloye, of DeWitt 
county; and Minnie ami Carrie, both at 
home with their parents. 

Mr. Dietrich east his first presidential 
ballol for Abraham Lincoln in [864, and 
since that time has never failed to support 
the Republican party at each presidential 
election, lie is a member of the school 
board in his district, and does all in Ins 
power to advance the moral, educational 
and material welfare of the community in 
which lie resides, lie and his wife v 
reared in the Lutheran faith and are people 
of the highest respectability. They began 
their married life in limited eircumstam 
hut by their combined efforts have steadily- 
prospered until they are now quite well- 

do. 



MARTIN P. SO i 

Among the comfortably situated citi- 
zens of Texas township who have sur- 
rounded themselves by the necessities and 
some of the luxuries of life by their own 
efforts and habits of high morality, thrift 
and perseverance, is Martin i\ Scott. I lis 
birth occurred near Rock ('reek. DeWitt 
county, Illinois, on March 27, 1850, and he 



is a son of John \Y. and Lieuenda (Blair) 
Scott. 

John \V. Scott was a farmer all his life 
as well as a physician by profession, and for 
a number of years after locating in Rock 
Creek he practiced in that locality as well 
as in Clinton, but as he grew older he de- 
voted his attention to his farming interests, 
and in whatever he undertook was very suc- 
cessful. This good man lived until our 
subject was about forty years of age and 
died while erecting a pleasant home for his 
family and himself in Texas township aboul 
two miles si .nth of the city of Clinton. J lis 
willow, who passed her eighty-seventh 
birthday in February, [901, resides with our 
subject in Texas township. Eight children 
were horn to this good man and his wife, 
namely: Elizabeth, who married Abraham 
Mooney, oi California; Sarah Ann, who 
married Robert Bennett, of Clinton, Iowa, 
and he is a contractor ami carpenter; Mary, 
who is the widow of William Kirby, who 
died about four years ago in Tunbridge 
township, and he was a fanner: Zirelda, 
who is the wife of II. C. Strange, and he is 
a fanner of I e\as township; Lorenzo Dow, 
a farmer of California; our subject; Vina, 
who is the wife of Henry 111-1111111. of Tun- 
bridge township, who is a farmer; John 
was killed by a train in Tunbridge about 
seven years ago, and he was a farmer, ami 
left a wife and children. 

Martin I'. Scott obtained his education 
in DeWitt county in tin- common schools 
and remained Upon the home place with his 
mother until he was fifteen. At that time, 
young as he was. this enterprising young 
fellow started out in life for himself and 
worked by the month for the farmers in the 
neighborhood. lie afterwards rented a 
farm in Texas township, which he farmed 
for one year, and then, having saved a suffi- 



II IK BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



303 



cienl amount of money, he purchased a 
small farm. After cultivating 11 and plac- 
ing it in excellent condition, this young 

business man disposed of it at a g 1 profit 

and invested his money in real estate until 
he is now the possessor of one hundred and 
sixteen acres of rich farming land in Tun- 
bridge township, in section [3, which ho 
has in a fine state of cultivation and on 
which is a good house and the necessary 
buildings, lie also farms what is known 
a- the Hall farm in Texas township, and it 
consists .if one hundred and thirty-live acres 
of the best land to he found in the State. 
This farm he operates himself and rents his 
other farm. In addition to carrying on gen- 
eral farming he raises stock to a certain ex- 
tent, and his product always finds ready 
..11 account of the excellent condition 
of the cattle and horses. Not only is Mr. 
Scott an owner of farm property hut he 
also owns live good houses and lots in the 
city of Clinton and one house and lot in 
Kenney. 

On November 15. 1871. Mr. Scott was 
rried to Miss Hattie Baker, a daughter 
of Lanson liaker, of Texas township. Mr. 
I laker was one of the early settlers and 
farmers of the county, and he died in 1872, 
and his widow survived him until June. 
I'lim. The part taken in local affairs by 
Mr. Raker was a prominent one. and he 
came to this locality front Logan county, 
' >hi. 1. about 1S60. 

Eight children have been horn to Mr. 
and Mr-. Scott, all of whom are living, 
namely: Aha, who is the wife of Charles 
Kirk, of Kenney; Charles, who resides four 
miles north of Birkbeck, engaged in farm- 
ing, ami he married Grace Stubblefield and 
they have one child, viz: Ralph: Ida. who is 

the wife of Fred Henderson, and he is a son 
of |bhn Henderson, of Tunhridge town- 



ship, and Fred is a fanner of Tunbridge 
town. hip: Effie, Blanche, Matie and [na, 
all of whom were born in DeWitt county, 

! exas tow nship, are at home. 

Mr. Scott and wife are active members 
die Christian church, to which he is a 
very liberal supporter and in which they are 
well liked. Socially Mr. Scott is connected 
with the order of < )dd Fellows, and has al- 
ways taken a great interest in that organi- 
ton. From the time he cast his first vote 
Mr. Scott has upheld the principles of the 
Republican party, and his influence in party 
matters is of weight throughout the town- 
ship. Starting out in life with a view of 
making a success ,,f his endeavors, he con- 
centrated his natural abilities upon this en. I. 
and. possessing a thorough knowledge of 
his business, he has forged steadily on until 
lie is novv of the substantial men of DeWitt 
county and a highly respected one. 



JOSEPH ARMSTRt >NG. 

Joseph Armstrong, who is familiarly 
called Uncle Joe by his numerous friends, 
owns and operates a well-improved and val- 
uable farm, pleasantly located .mi section _>, 
Wapella township, within a half mile of the 
village of Wapella. Jle has made his home 
in DeWitt county since [855, and dates his 
residence in the state from 1853. 

A native of England, Mr. Armstrong 
was horn in ( 'umberlandshire, on Christmas 
ei e, [829, and is a son of Joseph and Ann 
1 Hatherton) Armstrong. T7ie mother died 
in that country and about [859 the father 
came to America, and spent the remainder 
of his life in Clinton, Illinois. At one time 
he Started for California, but on reaching 
Omaha, Nebraska, he retraced Ins steps and 



304 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



again took up his residence in Clinton, where 
he died when about eighty one years of age. 
He married his third wife in this country, 
and she survived him, dying in [890. 

Mr. Armstrong, whose name introduces 
tin- review, grew to manhood upon a farm 
in his name land, and as hi- school privi- 
leges were limited in early life, he is almost 
wholly a self educated, as well a- a self-made 
man. In [853 he took passage at Liverpool 
on the Ocean Herald, an American sailing 
vessel, and made what was then considered 
a quick trip of twenty eight day-, arriving 
in New York in June of thai year. I le came 
direct to Illinois, and celebrated his firsl 4th 
of July in Bloomington. For a shori time 
he worked for Jesse Fell, a blacksmith of 
Normal, and was then employed a- a farm 

hand by the month in 1'iatt county, where he 
spent two years. 

In [855, as previously stated, Mr. Arm- 
strong came to DeWitl county, where he 
worked by the month several years, and 
later engaged in farming on rented land for 
some years. His first purchase consisted ol 
eighty acres on section 35, Wapella town- 
ship, which was then but slightly improved, 
and t.i its further development and cultiva- 
tion he has since devoted his energies, lie 
has added to this a tract of thirty-six and a 
half acres, has tiled and fenced the land, has 
built a Lrge, neat residence, barn and out- 
buildings, and today has a well-improved 
and beautiful farm. In connection with 
general fanning he is also engaged in stock 
raising. 

Mr. Armstrong was married in this 
comity, to Miss Ellen Stafford, who was also 
born and reared in England, and came to the 
new world when a young woman. They 
have only one child living: Isaac, who is 
married and now operates the home farm 
for his father. Joseph, another son. died 



in infancy, while Elizabeth, the only daugh- 
ter, grew to mature years and married Harry 
Mabie, and died leaving one child. Maud 
Elizabeth, who finds a home with her grand- 
parents. 

Politically Mr. Armstrong is a Repub- 
lican, hut he has never cared for office, pre- 
ferring to give his undivided attention to his 
farming interests. He came to the new 
world empty handed and began life among 
strangers with 110 money to aid him. hut by 
his own labor and enterprise he has met with 
success, and is now the owner ot a good 
property. He has also won the confidence 
and esteem of those with whom he has come 
in contact l>v Ins upright, honorable course 
ill life. 



NATHANIEL HELMICK. 

farmer City is the home of many men 
who are now passing their last days re- 
tired from the more active duties of life. 
Among this class of citizens we find the 
honored subjeel of this sketch, who, al- 
though now in his eighty-fifth year, is still 
hale and hearty. 

Mr. Ilelnuck was born in West Vir- 
ginia, lulv jo. [816, and is a son of Adam 
and Katherine t Hoffman ) Helmick. both 
natives of Lancaster county, Pennsylvania, 
where the family settled prior to the Revolu- 
tionary war, in which great struggle for 
American independence both the .paternal 
and maternal grandfathers of our subject 
took an active part, serving under General 
( icorge Washington. 

Adam Helmick was twice married and 
it was from his second union that Nathaniel 
was horn. His father was poor in this 
world's goods and as a consequence could 




NATHANIEL HELMICK. 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



307 



iii >t be of much assistance in a temporal 
sense. He was nevertheles "1 man 

and sought In 'th by precept and example 
t" instill good principles into his children, 
and his last thoughts and words were to the 
effect that they might lead good lives and 
meet him in heaven. 

Nathaniel Ilehnick continued to reside 
in the place of his nativity until the 2_>d 
of September, [846, when he started fur 111- 
linois, then the far west. After a full month 
■ mi the way by wagon and team, he arrived 
near Taylorville, Christian county, Illinois. 
Here he remained but a short time, moving 
from there to Rutledge township, DeWitt 
county, i'ii the 7th day of February, 1S47. 
Here he made his home until March. [879, 
when he moved t" Farmer City, where he 
has since made his home. 

On September 1. 1836, he married Miss 
Mary Tringler and as a reush of this union 
the following children were burn: James, 
Adam. Crusla. Letitia. Jane. F.lihu Wesley. 
Felix 1'i'lk. Mary Catherine. Henry Frank- 
lin. Susan Minerva, Nathaniel Tierce. Charles 
Jackson, and Stephen A. All the children 

\ in full manhood and womanhood and 
had families of their own before there was 
a break in the large family by death. Leti- 
tia Jane, who was married to a Mr. Harper, 
was the first t' 1 answer the summons of 
death, passing away on the 17th day of 
December, iNN_>. and on the 20th day of 
November, t886, Susan Minerva, who was 
married to Frank Horn, was called to her 
final reward. James, the oldest boy, died in 
Arkansas September 21, 1891. In July. 
[876, after the family had all been reared. 
Mrs. Helmick passed away, after almosl 
furty years of faithfulness t" her husband 
and df service ami devotion t" her home. 
She was a noble Christian woman and was 
mourned by all who knew her. 

14 



On July 7, [878, Mr. Helmick was 
again married, his second union being with 
Mary A. McClain. who is still his faithful 
and devoted companion. 

Mr. Helmick is strictl) a self-made 
man and what success he has achieved in 
this world is the result of his own well di- 
rected efforts, his economy, frugalitj and 
perseverance, n 1S47. when he landed in 
Rutledge township, his whole earth} pi 
sessions consisted of a wife. sc-\en children, 
two burses and a wagon load of household 
goods, and mie hundred and seventy-live 
dollars in cash. His first purchase of land 
consisted of forty acres, upon which lie 
erected a rude log house. He added to his 
^inal purchase until he had enough land 
1" give each one of his children one hundred 
acres. With hardly the necessities of life, 
he began his residence in this state and bore 
his share of the hardships incident to the 
life of a pioneer. Bui he started life with 
these high principles: t" work hard, to be 
honest in all his dealings with his fellow- 
men, and to be economical. For over fifty 
years he has been an earnest and faithful 
member of the Methodist Episcopal church 
and his many friends will testify to the true 
Christian life which he has always led. 
Such men's lives are \\orth\- of emulation 
and in 1 work devoted to the lives of the pio- 
neers of DeWitt county would be compli 
without the record of Nathaniel Ilehnick. 



WILLIAM ALEXANDER BARNETT. 

Clinton probably has no more energetic 
ur enterprising business man than this well- 
known bridge manufacturer, who is to-day 
the only manufacturer in the city. lie also 
conducts a general repair shop for repairing 



3 o8 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



all kind- of machinery, and lias built up a 
large and constantly increasing trade. A 
native of 1 )eWitt county, he was born < )cto- 
ber i<). [858, in Clintonia township, on a 
farm which he now owns. From his father, 
William 1'.. Barnett, he traces his ancestry 
hack through Alexander I... John and James 
Barnett, tojbhn Barnett, of whom tradition 



saw that he was a soldier and surgeon under 
General Greene in the Revolutionary war. 
and took pari in the battle of Cowpens, 
South Carolina, lie was born m Virginia, 
n!" Scotch parentage, and was considered one 
of the mosl skillful physicians and surgeons 
of his day, having written a book on the 
treatment of all kinds of diseases. I lis son, 
James, who was also a native of Virginia, 
followed surveying in early life and later en- 
gaged m farming. 

John Barnett, the son of James, was 
born in the < >ld Dominion, moved to Ken- 
tucky, near Paris, Bourbon county, and 
married Sally Kinney, b) whom he had the 
following named children : Robert F., born 
in 1807, died in 1864; Franklin, born in 

[808, died in [871; Alexander I... born in 

[810, died in 1 886; Maria, born in 1812, and 

Juliette. l»>rn in 1N14. both died in infancx ; 
Elizabeth, born in [816, died in 1862 ; James, 

1 in 1819, died in [889. 

( )f this family Alexander 1.. Barnett was 
the grandfather of our subject, lie was 
born in Bourbon county, Kentucky, Octo- 
ber 1;. 1 Sin. and became a planter anil 
slave holder, but being subsequently con- 
vinced that slavery was wrong, he freed his 
slaxes and then followed farming in his na- 
tive state. In [832 he came to what is now 
DeWitt county, Illinois, and entered six or 
seven hundred acres of land. lie died in 
Clinton. Illinois, at the residence of \Y. 1!. 
Barnett, \pril 30, 1886. His wife, who was 
Miss Elizabeth II. Hall, a daughter of 



Mahlon Hall, was horn in Kentucky, Feb- 
ruary 28, [813, and died December 7. [893. 
Their children were William I'... the father of 
our subject; James R., who was horn No 
vemher 17, [836, and is still living; Eliza, 
who was born May [3, [838, and died Sep- 
tember 2j. [839; Cassander, who was horn 
Februar) 29, [840, and is still living; Sarah, 
who was horn November [9, [841, and died 
October [6, [864; Juliet, who was born No- 
vember J. [842, and is still living; John, 
who was horn November 10. 1045. and died 
November [9, [900; triplets, one hoy and 
two -nls, who were horn January 29, 1N4K, 
and died at birth; Alexander was horn No- 
vember 25, [849, and is still living; and 
Nancy, who was born < tctober 15. 1N51, and 

died AugUSl l8, [853. 

William 1!. Barnett, our subject's fa- 
ther, was bom in Barnett township, this 
countw August _'i. 1835, and after reaching 
manhood received forty acres of choice 
prairie land in Clintonia township, where he 
made his home throughoul the greater part 

of his life. When sewing machines were 

first introduced in the west he became agent 
for the same, and for twenty-five years han- 
dled all kinds «,f sewing machines. I lis hon- 
orable dealings won for him the confidi 
and respect of all with whom he came in 
contact. In [880 he removed to Clinton 
and opened an office, but longing lor his 
country home, he soon returned to the farm 
to please both himself and wife. They came 
to Clinton again in [886 and here spent the 
remainder of their lives. On the 26th of 
August, [855, was celebrated his marriage 
with Miss Sarah E. Duncan, who was horn 
near Lexington, Kentucky, August 29, 1 Sjj, 
and in [838 came to DeWitt county. Illi- 
nois, with her parents, Samuel and Mary 
(Cockrell) Duncan, locating in Clintonia 
township, on the Eli Brown farm. She is 



Till- HIOCKAPIIICAL RED IRD. 



309 



one of a family of six children, the others 
being John A.. .Martha. James, Louis and 
Lucretia Duncan. The only child l>'>rn to 

William B. and Sarah E. 1 Duncan) Barnett 
1- William Alexander, our subject. The la- 
ther died September 14. [898, but themother 
i- still 1 i \ i 1 1 u and continues t< 1 make her home 
in Clinton. 

William A. Barnett, of this review, 
passed his boyhood and youth on the home 
farm and received his earl) education in a 
log school house, where he certainly im- 
proved every opportunity, for at the age of 
fifteen years he passed an examination and 
was recommended to teaching, being given a 
first-grade certificate on a standing of ninet) - 
seven and a half per cent. His 
however, prevented him from teaching and 
he did not begin that occupation until Octo- 
ber 15. [876. After his third term he took a 
course at the Wesleyan University, Bloom- 
ington, beginning September, 1879. During 
the summer months he assisted his father on 
the farm until 1883, when he commenced 
selling school furniture. In [886 he rep 
sented the road machines of Phillips & Pres- 
ton, of Peoria, and the next year the West- 
ern Wheel Scraper Company, in the mean- 
time teaching during the winter months. In 
[888 he resigned his school during the last 
part of the term and acepted the position of 
state agent for Western Wheel & Scraper 
Company, manufacturers of road niacin 
and earth moving tools. IK- also touk up 
bridge building,which he followed quite suc- 

sfully until [894, when he was accident- 
ally shot in the arm while hunting, and was 
idle from September _'. [894, to April. [895. 
From the 1 >t of April. [895, until January, 
iX<)h. Ik- engaged in bridge contracting, ami 
the following year. 1897, became state agent 
for the Bellefontaine Bridge & Iron Com- 



pany, holding that position until January, 
10 'i. lie then opened a simp for the man- 
ufacture of iron bridges and repair work. 
In this factory he now employs from t : 
to eight men and has two men upon the 
road. He is also engaged in bridge building 
and has taken a number of contracts for iron 
work in Clinton, including that for the I ni- 
versalist church and for al! the buildings 
erected lately. 

tober 17. [883, Air. Barnetl married 
Miss Lucy J. Moore, daughter of William 
and Hannah (Wright) Moore, and grand- 
daughter of Mason and Margaret (Adams) 
Moore. Her grandfather was a native of 
Virginia, hut spent his last days in Ohio, 
whither he removed in [839. 1 1 i -> children 
were Townsend, .Miriam. William M., 
Franklin, Serepta J. and Joseph. Mrs. Har- 
nett's father was horn in Loudoun county, 
Virginia, December 25, [831, and in 1N57 
came to DeWitt county, Illinois, locating on 
what is now know 11 as the II. L. Stamats 
farm in Creek township. Later he was as- 
sociated with Magill Brothers in stock-rais- 
ing ami shipping, and in [878 was elected 
superintendent of the county farm at ilills- 
ville, which position he filled for four year-. 
He died January 28, [886, honored ami re- 
ted by all who knew him. His children 
were Franklin M., horn October 26, [856; 
Lucy Jane. December <>. [858; Humphrey 
A.. February 25, [87] : and William M., I 
tober [9, [872. Mr. and Mrs. Harnett have 
two children: Sylvia, horn February 13, 
[886; and Ira Mason, horn June 7. iSSS. 

Fraternally Mr. Harnett affiliates with 
the Knights of Pythias and the Modern 
Woodmen of America. In politics he is a 
stanch Democrat, and is now acceptably 
serving his second term as alderman of the 
city. A man of superior executive ability 



3io 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



and sound judgment, he already occupies a 
good position in the business world, and is 
highly respected and esteemed by all who 
know him. 



XKI.S P. JOHNSON. 

Sweden has furnished to America many 
of its best and most enterprising citizens, 
and among those who have settled in De 
Witt county is Nels P. Johnson, who now 
owns and operates a valuable farm in Santa 
Anna township, and is also successfully en- 
gaged in stock raising. He was born in 
Halsenburg, Sweden, Vpril 22, [861, and is 
a son of Jen and Hannah | Pierson) John- 
son, who spent their entire lives a^ farming 
people in thai country. 

Mr. Johnson was reared and educated in 
his native land. Being possessed of a bright 
and active brain, and hearing glowing ac- 
counts of the advantages offered ambitious 
and energetic young men in the new world. 
he decided to try his fortune on this side of 
the Atlantic. So bidding goodbj to home 
and friends, he came to the United States in 
[882 and has never had occasion to regret 
his emigration ( oming to Illinois, he first 
worked for Mark Dunham, of Du Page 
county, the greal horse breeder. He then 
went to Weldon, DeWitt county, where he- 
was employed l>v the month as a farm hand 
for three years, during which time he saved 
every cent possible, lie next engaged in 
farming upon rented land, and then, in pari 
nership with B. Magison, purchased one 
hundred and sixt) acres in the Kentuck) 
tlement. After two years of hard and suc- 
cessful work he sold his interest in the place 
and operated a rented farm for five years. 
He next bought one hundred and sixty acres 
of W. Gray and 1). Drew, which he traded. 



in [898, for the Harry Swigart farm in 
Santa Anna township, consisting of three 
hundred and seven acres. This place was 
then all run down, but he rebuilt the fences, 
remodeled the old barn, set up a windmill, 
which pumps the water for his stock, and has 
set out all kinds of fruit, si 1 that he now has 
one of the best farms in this pari oi the 
county. He raises a high grade of horses 
ami cattle, including some thoroughbred 
tock, and in all his undertakings is meeting 
with well deserved success. 

Mr. Joryison married Miss lata Hatfield. 
Her father. Thomas Hatfield, was horn in 
Lancaster. England, May 21, [848, and in 
[861 came to America with his parents, 
Peter and Mary Ann (Combs) Hatfield, the 
family locating on a farm in Champaign 
county, Illinois In England Peter Hatfield 
followed the weaver's trade and became su- 
perintendent of a large manufactory, but 
here lu- engaged in farming. During the 
( i\ il war he left home to go to the front 
and was never heard from again. His wife 
died when about fortj three years of age and 
most ,,f their nine children died young. 
Thomas Hatfield grew to manhood upon a 
farm ami married Miss Barbara C. Prough, 
a daughter of Jacob and Nancy (Cresingei 1 
Prough. Throughout his active business life 
he has followed agricultural pursuits and is 
now superintending the beautiful farm of E. 
i lelmick in Rutledge t. iw nship, ha\ ing come 
to this county in [898. In his family were 
twelve children : Minnie, deceased; Clinton; 
Laura ; Etta ; Eugene; Belle; Bert ; < >llie. de- 
ceased; Nellie; Nora; Mamie and Leatha. 
Religiously Mr. Johnson is a member of 
the Lutheran church, and fraternally is a 
member of the Knights of Pythias and the 
Ratlibone Sisters. His political support is 
always given the men and measures of the 
Republican party. He is one of the self 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



si i 



men of die comity and 
credit i"<>r the chieved, as he 

came to this country empty handed, and he 
lias had to make his way in the world entirely 
unaided. 



FREDERICK HOFFMAN. 

Frederick Hoffman, of section 27, I « 

township. 1 >e\\ itt county. 11'inois, was horn 
on June 22, 1849, at Hesse Darmstadt, Ger- 
many. He is a sou of Nicholas and Mar- 
I [offman. The father came 
to the United States in [853 with his family. 
They -ailed from Bremen and had a very 
long and stormy passage, being on the water 
nearly three months. 

At the end of this journey they landed 
in New York and came at once to Illinois, 
locating at Peoria. Here they remained the 
first winter and the father worked with his 
brother-in-law. In the spring h< i in 

farming for himself, renting a farm near 
Peoria and there continued for eight year-. 
At the expiration of that time he purchased 
one hundred and sixty acre- of wild prairic- 
land in Peoria county, and this he improved 
and put under cultivation, creating a good 
and substantial home and erected a comfort- 
able house Here he continued until his 

ih. which occurred when he was sixtv- 
eight year- of a| 

The mother of our subject died when she 
- ninety year- of age, in 1899 in Macon 
county. Illinois, < >ur subject was one of -ix 
children born to his parents and the fifth in 
order of birth. Five of these children are 
still living. The father was a Democrat in 
jtolitics and the parents were both members 
of the Catholic church. 

The education of our subject was ob- 
tained in the common schools of Peoria 



county. Children of the present day 1 

no realization of the hardships endured by 

their parent cure the 

1 them. 
The tiny |i . with walls filled witn 

mud and floored with rough slabs of w 
filled with "-liver-" for tender feet, would 
he poorly heated by the open fireplace situat- 
ed in one end of the room. The hack' 

ts were made of pieces of wood unplaned 
and rough, with pegs for legs, and a hole in 
the wall gave a little light and fresh air. 
Aside from the "speller" and a tattered ln-ok 
or two. generally the property of the "teach- 
er." the only fund from which information 
could he drawn was the Bible, so that small 
wonder was it that in the early day- of this 

ntry, although Sunday-schools were un- 
known, for children to be made familiar with 
1 1. >ly Writ from infancy up. 

For two years after his father'- death 
our subject remained at home, conducting 
the property for the estate. In 1S74 he re- 
moved to DeWitt county, ariving in Novem- 
ber of that year and rented land. Later he 
removed to Macon county, but after seven 
year- returned to DeWitt county and pur- 
chased seventy-nine and one-half acres of 
land on section 27, Texas town-hip. This 
property he has improved and upon it he has 

led a comfortable home and reside'! in it 
ever since. Hi- broad acre- -how the result 
of his careful cultivation and ,ul of his build- 
ings are in excellent condition. Mr. Hoff- 
man understands thoroughly the latest im- 
proved method- of farming and owns and 
uses machinery in the operation of his work. 
Hi- cattle are of a good breed and his hors 
kept in excellent condition, although he <\ 
not aim to do any extensive breeding, de- 
voting his time to general farming. 

Mr. Hoffman married Mary A. Mallard 

on April 14. 1873, in Peoria county. She i- 



315 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



the daughter of Jefferson V. Mallard, who 
was born in North Carolina, but came to Illi- 
nois about 1855 and located at Pontiac, Illi- 
nois. By trade he was a blacksmith and 
formed one of the many who did so much 
to make Illinois the great commonwealth it 
is 1 1 day. 

Eight children were born to the man i 
of Mr. and Mrs. Hoffman, namel) : [Cath- 
erine, who is the wife of William De Priest, 
a farmer of Texas township; Mary, who is 
at home; Delia, who is the wife of Charles 
White, of towa; Minnie: Bertha; Carl; 
William and Freda. All of these children 
have grown to be a credit and pleasure to 
their parents, and while some have flittered 
from the home, those who are left make 
cheer} the pleasant house and join the par- 
ents in showing delightful hospitality to the 
visiti >rs within their gates. 

In politics Mr. Hoffman is a Democrat, 
and so deepl} do his friends and fellow 
townsmen recognize his merits that he has 
been called upon to serve as school director 
and is now holding that office, while he has 
also served the township in various other ca- 
pacities, meeting the obligations of his 
charges in a manner that reflects great credit. 
not only on Mr. Hoffman himself, but also 
on those who elected him to positions of 
trust and respi insibilitv. 



[AMES A. BATES. 



lames A. Hates, one of Chilton's lai 
plastering contractors, was horn in that city 
on the 15th of September, [857. I lis father, 
George Washington Bates, was born in Ma- 
rion. Ohio, December 14. 1829, and was a 
son of \sa and Lydia (Rosebury) Bates. 
The grandfather was a large landowner of 



1 (hio, where he was extensively engaged in 
farming and stock dealing for some years, 
but he and his wife spent their last days in 
Springfield, Illinois. Their children were 
Angeline, Temperance. George Washing- 
ton, Zenus, Elizabeth, Sarah. Isabel and 
Franklin, 

George W. Bates received a good educa- 
tion in the public schools of his native state, 
and then taught school for some time. Com- 
ing to Clinton, DeWitt county, he learned 
the plasterer's trade, and soon began con- 
tracting in that line. About [872 lie re- 
ed to l inner City, where he built a fine 
residence, and successfull} engaged in plas- 
tering and paper hanging at that place until 
his death, which occurred August [2, 1892. 
llis widow is still a resident of Farmer City. 
In her maidenhood she was Miss Ann Maria 
Wo, idward, a daughter of I >r. James W. and 
Mary (Blakemore) Woodward. Her fa- 
ther was horn in Lee county, Virginia, July 
jS. [813, a s, m of James and Jane (Hay den) 
Woodward. The Doctor's paternal grand- 
father came to this country from Wheatland, 
England, and participated in the Revolution- 
ary war. By occupation he was a farmer, 
as was also his son. James Woodward. The 
latter was 1 k ►111 in Stafford o unty. Virginia, 
and about [832 came to Logan county. Illi- 
nois, where he died when ah, nit sixt} years 
and his wife at the age of seventy- 
six. She was a daughter of Harry i iavden. 
also a native of the Old Dominion, and a 
soldier of the Revolutionary war. In the 
family of James and Jane ( I Iavden ) Wood- 
ward were the following children: Henry, 
I 'oily. Lemuel, Lydia, Lucy, John, Nancy, 
Emily, Jane. Jessie, James W. and David. 
The last two are still living. 

During his boyhood and youth Dr. 

W Iward attended the public schools until 

sixteen years of age and then commenced the 



Till'. IHOCRAriUCAI. KI-VOKR 



313 



study "i medicine under Dr. Abram Still, of 
Lee county, Virginia, one of tin- noted physi- 
cians of his clay. Dr. Woodward began 
practice in Logan county, Illinois, at the age 

<>t" twenty-two years, and about 1S44 came 
to Clinton, but in [855 he removed to Farm- 
er City, where lie still resides. For many 
years he enjoyed an excellent practice at that 
place, hut for the past decade has practically 
lived retired, hut is still called in consulta- 
tion many times. Fraternally he is a mem- 
ber of the Masonic order and the Indepen- 
dent Order of Odd Fellows, and also the 
Eastern Star Chapter and Rebekah branch 
of those fraternities. lie has been twice 
married, his first wife being Mary Blake 
more, daughter of Charles Blakemore. She 
died when over forty years of age, leaving 
five children: Mrs. Olive Bullock, Mrs. Ann 
M. Bates, Mrs. [sabel McDonald, Mr. W. 
Blakemore Woodward and Mrs. Ellen Hal- 
low ay. The Doctor's present wife was Miss 
Sarah W. Chambers, a native of Kentucky, 
and a daughter of Rev. William and Sarah 
( McReynolds t Chambers. I ler father was a 
native of Maryland and a Methodist Episco- 
pal minister. By 1 his second union Dr. 
Woodward has two daughters, Mrs. Laura 
French and Mrs. Minnie Bach. 

Mr. Bates, whose name introduces this 
sketch, was reared and educated in Clinton, 
and during his boyhood commenced learning 
the plasterer's trade with his father at Farm- 
er City, hut completed his apprenticeship 
with an uncle at Clinton. He then worked 
as a journeyman until [886, and since that 
time has engaged in contracting in Clinton, 
doing the work in his line on nearly all of 
the principal buildings erected lure, includ- 
ing the south ward school house, the east 

ward school house, the Universalis! church 
and Mi's. Henry Magill's residence. He has 
als.> taken contracts of high grade work in 



Farmer City, DeVYitt and Weldon, this 
county. 

Mr. Bates was united in marriage with 
Miss Carrie E. Bordwell, a daughter of 
Marcus Bordwell, of Manteno, Illinois, ami 
the) have become the parents of three chil- 
dren: Ethel M. and Opal M.. twins, hum 
August t8, 1882 ; and Claud S., born August 
jo. 1SN7. The family have a pleasant home 
in Clinton, which was erected by Mr. Bates 
in [896. He affiliates with the Independent 

Order of Odd Fellows and the Knights of 
Pythias fraternities, and has held office in 
the latter lodge. 



(II \1M.KS FINNEY \.\IS1 >h.\. 

During tin- few shorl years that Charles 
Finney Amsden was numbered among the 
leading business nun of Clinton, he won the 
■-teem of all here and his death was widely 
mourned. Before coming here he was en- 
gaged in the banking business and was also 
largely interested in a creamer) enterprisi 
Manchester. Iowa. When Henry Magill's 
health failed he urged Mr. Amsden, his son- 
in-law, to come to Clinton and assist him in 
his business. Accordingly he severed other 
business relations and removed to this pi, 
hut his own health, never robust, soon be- 
gan to fail. ( )n the death of Mr. Magill 

lie purchased a half interest in the dry g Is 

store formerly owned by Magill Brothers, 
and the other half was sold to William hunk, 
at which time the firm name of Amsden & 
Funk was assumed. Three years later Mr. 
Funk sold his interest to \. II. Magill, and 
under the new management the husim-ss was 
successfully continued. During the winter 
of [886-7 Mr Amsden' S health failed and he 
went to Hot Springs, Arkansas. He also 



3>4 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



traveled extensively, hoping to be benefited 
thereby, but death came to him on the 21 t 
of December, [888, at the home of his par- 
ents. 

In the fall of iSSj Mr. ^msden mar- 
ried Miss Hattie Eliza Magill, a daughter of 
the late Henry Magill, whose name is in- 
separably interwoven with the substantial 
development and upbuilding of this por- 
tion of Illinois. Mr. ^msden was a 
man of rare intellectual accomplishments 
and lie possessed thai culture and knowl 
edge which only travel can bring, lie 
had several times heen abroad and in for- 
eign lands lie had gleaned many interesting 
facts and anecdotes, winch enriched his con- 
versation and made him a mosl entertaining 
companion. I lis social, genial nature and 
manly worth also made him very popular. 
I lis death was a great loss t<> Clinton, not 
onlj on account of his excellent Ihmius^ 
ability, which contributed to the commercial 
prosperity, but also on accou i oi his social 
nature and his patriotic citizenship. I le was 
an active member of the Masonic; lodge, and 
in his life exemplified the beneficent spirit 
dt" the fraternity. Mrs. Amsden now lives 
w ith her mother in Clinti in. 



|( ) 1 IX KISSACK. 



It is astonishing to witness the success 
of young men who have emigrated to Amer- 
ica without capital and have worked their 
way upward to a position of affluence. The 
readiness with which they adapt themselves 
to circumstances and take advantage oi the 
opportunities offered, brings to them suc- 
cess and wins them a place among the lead- 
ing men of the community in which they re- 
side. To this class belongs John Kissack, 



a large land owner and successful farmer, 
who is now living in a beautiful residence 
in the suburbs of Farmer City. 

I le was 1" irn on the Isle of Man. Febru- 
ary i.(. [844, and is a son of John and Cath- 
erine (Craine) Kissack. who were of Manx 
ancestry and spent their entire lives on the 
Isle of Man. They were hardy people, of 
Strong constitutions, and lived to a ripe old 
age, the father being seventy-four at the 
time oi his death and the mother eighty- 
I lur subject is the second in order oi 
birth in their family of ten children, the 
others being Eleanor, Thomas. William, 
Robert, Caesar, Daniel, David, Edward and 
James. 

During his minority. Mr. Kissack re- 
mained on the island home and during the 
last three years of his residence there 
worked as a laborer away from home. At 
the age of twenty-two he determined to 
come to America. Borrowing part of the 
money with which to pay his passage, he 

crossed the Atlantic and landed in Port 
land. Maine, whence he proceeded to Ro- 
chester. \ew York, where he found em- 
ployment as a farm hand, hut believing 
the west was the best place for a young 
man. he decided to conn- i,, Mlniois m [867 
and grow up with the country. Subsequent 
years demonstrated that he displayed excel- 
lent judgment in making a selection for a 
home, lie was first employed in a warehouse 
in Tazewell county, then engaged in brick- 
making, and later in agricultural pursuits, 
being willing to work at anything whereby 
he could earn an honest dollar. 

The height of Mr. Kissack's ambition 
at that lime was to own a farm, and in the 
spring of [870 he purchased eighty acres 
of raw prairie land in McLean county of 
II. C. Luce, and to its cultivation and im- 
provement he at once turned his attention. 




JOHN KISSACK. 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



317 



Success crowned his well -directed efforts, 
and the fields yielded a bountiful return for 
the care and labor bestowed upon them. 
Later Mr. Kissack purchased two hundred 
and eighty acres of land, fort) acres of which 
is in Piatt county, and in [890 bought the 
Pat Campbell farm of "tie hundred and 
ninet) acres in Santa Anna township, He- 
Witt county, and in the fall of [901 bought 
two hundred and eight) acre- of the Will- 
iam Lindsey farm and now has eight hun- 
dred and thirty acres in all. lie has al- 
ways given considerable attention to the 
raising of stock, and keeps a high grade of 
horse-, cattle, sheep and hogs, his specialty 
being largely mixed Shropshire sheep. He 
now makes his home on his farm it; Santa 
Anna township, and in the midst of a beauti- 
ful grove has erected a very large and ele- 
gant modem residence. 

Mr. Kissack was married in [879 to 
Miss Clarissa M. Maxlield. a native of Ma- 
coupin county. Illinois, and a daughter of 
Robert 11. and Sarah (Petefish) Maxlield. 
and granddaughter of George and Sarah 
1 Thomas 1 Maxtield. all of whom were born 
in Kentucky and at an early day removed to 
Macoupin county. Illinois. There the 
grandfather died when over seventy years 
of age, and his wife passed away at the 
age of eighty-nine. Their children were 
George W., Charles, Thomas. Porter. Clara, 
Sarah. Margaret and Eliza. Robert 11. 
Maxlield. who was a carpenter and farmer 
by occupation, died at the age of sixty-six 
years, and his wife is still living at the age 
of eighty-four. They had a family of eight 
children, namely: John W., S. Elizabeth, 
James K.. Ellen P., Clarissa M.. Luther R., 
M. Bell and Edwin ('•. The children horn 
to Mr. and Mrs. Kissack were Ellen Olivia, 
who died at the age of three months: John 
Robert, who is attending the Farmer City 



high school; and Luther M.. who died at 
the age 1 >f seven years. 

Politically Mr. Kissack is a strong Pro- 
hibitionist; and religiously is an active and 
faithful member of the Methodisl Epicopal 
church, in which he has served as steward, 
trustee, class leader, superintendent of the 
Sunday school and is now Bible class teach- 
er, lie has led an upright, honorable and 
useful life, well worthy of emulation, and is 
held in the highest respect by all who know 

him. 

■» »» 

jo I IX BUTTERWORTH. 

The subject of this sketch has the dis- 
tinction of having won the proud American 
title of a self-made man. For almost half 
a century he has been identified with the ag- 
ricultural interests .if DeWitt county, and 
still owns and occupies a good farm on sec- 
tii 'ii 32, Wilson t< iwuship. 

Mr. Lutterworth was born September 26, 
[826, in Lancastershire, England, of which 
county his parents, Gouther and Hannah 
1 Mathews) Lutterworth, were also natives, 
though the latter was of Welsh descent, her 
father being a Welshman. ( )ur subject's pa- 
ternal grandfather was John Lutterworth, 
who was a farmer and veterinary surgeon, 
and spent his entire life in England. 

Gouther Butterworth was a cotton weav- 
er by trade and followed that occupation in 
England until [842, when he came to the 
United States, sailing from Liverpool to 
New York City. I lis destination was 
Bridgeport, Connecticut, where he had 
friends living and where he soon found em- 
ployment in the cotton mills. The following 
year he was joined by his family, whom he 
had left in England, and in 184(1 removed to 
a small town near Providence, Rhode ts- 



3iS 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



land where lie worked in cotton mills for a 
year. He next made his home at Fall River, 
Massachusetts, where he was living when 
gold was discovered in California. During 

the excitement of (849 he. in company with 
other men. went to the Pacific coast by way 
of Cape 1 torn, and was never heard En im bu1 
once after arriving there, it being supposed 
that he was killed Eor his money. His wife 
subsequently came west with our subjed and 
died in this county, in [875, at the age of 
seventj two years, her remains being in- 
terred in Sugar Grove cemetery. She was a 
good Christian woman, a member of the 
Methodist Episcopal church ?nd devoted her 
life to carefullj rearing her children. In 
the family were eight children, of whom 
our subjed is the oldest, the others being 
Betsy, who married John Thorp, one ol 
the early settlers of this county, and both 
are now deceased; Samuel, a resident ot 
Sumner county. Kansas; Sarah, who died 
young in England; James, a resident ol 
Bloomington, Illinois; Mice, wife of A.verj 
l\es. of Nebraska; Susanna, wife of Her 
bert Ives, of Kansas; and Robert, of Bloom- 
ington, Illinois. 

During his boyhood John Butterworth 
learned the cotton weaver's trade and worked 
in the mills of John Bright, of England, un- 
til the emigration of the family to America, 
in 1843, when he joined his father in Bridge 
port, Connecticut. Being the oldesl of the 
family the responsibility of caring for the 
mother and the younger children devolved 
upon him when the father went to California 
in 1X411. The following year they removed 
to New Bedford, Massachusetts, where he 
worked in the cotton mills for about three 
years, and at the end of that time went to 
Shakersville, that state, whrre he left the 
family on coming w est. 

It was in .March. [855, that Mr. Butter 



worth came to Illinois, and on his way, in 
( Ihicago, met another young man. Together 
they proceeded to DeWitt county, where our 
subject purchased three hundred and twenty 
acres of wild prairie land of the Illinois Cen- 
tral Railroad Company, three and a quarter 
miles east ol \\ apella on what is now section 
32, Wilson township. He then sent word 
for his mother and other members of the 
family to join him here, and after their ar- 
rival in [856 he and his brother Samuel 
erected a small house on what is now the 
James Butterworth place, it being ready for 
occupancy in the fall of that year. It is 
still standing, hut has since been enlarged 
and improved. The brothers all set to work 
to improve the farm, breaking the land with 
four yoke of cattle, hut it was slow and 
tedious work for them, as they were entire!} 
unfamiliar with agricultural pursuits, hav- 
ing been brought up to work- in cotton mills. 
( me hundred and sixty acres of the original 
tract is still in possession of die family, our 
subject owning half of this amount. Ills 
laud is under a high state of cultivation and 
is well improved. I le has set out many trees 
along the highway, which are a source ol 
great pleasure to those who drive along the 
road. lie also owns a forty acre tract of 
land on section 29, Wilson township, and 
some property in the village of VVapella, all 
of which has been acquired through his own 

unaided efforts. Being a man of g 1 busi- 

ih'ss ability ami sound judgment he has 
Steadily prospered, ami well merits the suc- 
cess that he has achieved in life. 

Mr. Butterworth was married February 
_}. [858, to Miss Hannah D. .Martin, who 
was horn either in Ohio or Virginia. Her 
parents, Samuel and Rebecca Martin, were 
both natives of the Old Dominion, and were 
carle settlers of Randolph township, Mc- 
Lean county. Illinois. By this union were 



Till-. BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



3'9 



1» Tii five children, namel) : 11) Mary is 
now the wife Adolphus Mitchell, of Iowa, 
ami has seven children, Ezra, Irvin, Charles, 
Bessie, John, Ray and Inez. (2) Charles, a 
resident of California, married Ida Petra and 
has three children, Earl, Mabel and cue un- 
named. (3) Anna is the wife of Lincoln 
Walden, of Wilson township, and they have 
three children. Clarence. Blanche and 
George. 141 Laura A. is the wife of A. R. 
Black, who lives on the home place with our 
subject, and they have four children, lrcia, 
John. Clara and Archie. (5) Clara is the 
wife of Grant Walden. of Wilson township, 
and they have two children, Fern and Lotas. 
The wife of our subject died in [899, at the 
age of sixty-nine years, and was laid to 
rest in the Sugar Grove cemetery. She was 
a faithful member of the Methodist Episi 
pal church, to which Mr. Butterworth also 
belongs, and he has served as a trustee of 
the same. Politically he is a supporter of 
the Republican party, and has held the office 
of township clerk, lie is known among his 
fellow citizens for his reliability in all things, 
and he justly merits their confidence and re- 
gard. 



JOHN" KILLOUGH. 

This gentleman is entitled to distinction 
a- one of the most progressive and enterpris- 
ing men of Clinton, and has for man) years 
been prominently identified with her business 
and political interests. Upon the commercial 
activity of a community depends it- pros 
perity and the men who are now recognized 
a- leading citizen- are those who are at the 
head of paying business enterprises, such as 
Mr. Killough, who i- the senior member of 
the firm of Killough & Johnson, well-known 
hardware merchants of Clinton. 



Mr. Killough was born near Fulton 
House, Lancaster county, Pennsylvania, 
cember 10. [845, and 1- a son of Robert and 
Sidney 1 Hoopes) Killough, who were farm- 
ing people. The father attained the age of 
enty-three years, and the mother sixty- 
nine. Our subject grew to manh 1 on the 

home farm, and after attending the public 
schools of the neighborhood for some time, 
he entered tin- Stale Normal School at Mil- 
lersville, Pennsylvania, afjer which he en- 
gaged in teaching and later he spent a year 
and a half at a polytechnic college in Phila- 
delphia, where he took a course in civil en- 
gineering. 

Mr. Killough came west in [868, to take- 
up civil engineering, but for one term en- 
gaged in teaching near Delavan, Tazewell 
county, Illinois. Subsequently he was with 
the engineering corps of the Chicago & Alton 
Railroad for two year- and a half on con- 
struction work, and then went t.> Canada in 
the emplo) of what is now the Michigan 
1 entral Railroad one year. During the fol- 
lowing two years he was with the Hamilton 
& Lake Erie Railroad, headquarters at Ham- 
ilton, ( >ntario. At the end of this period he 
determined to change his vocation, and hav- 
ing accumulated enough to embark in busi- 
- and establish a home for himself. Mr. 
Killough came to Clinton, Illinois, in 1S75. 
having heard good reports of tin- progres- 
sive little city and the line country surround- 
ing it. He purchased II. II. Harwood's in- 
terest in the firm of Harwood & Merriam, 
hardware dealer-. Under the linn of Mer- 
riam & Killough they carried on business un- 
til [878, when our subject purchased his 
partner's interest.and was then alone in busi- 
ness until February 1. [901. He bought the 
building which hail been erected bj William 
Clagg iii [865. It wa- then eighty by twen- 
ty-two feet in dimensions. Mr. Killough 



320 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



built an addition in the rear, making it one 
hundred and twenty-four feet deep. He 
utilizes both the first and second floors, as 
well as the basement. * >n the 20th of April. 
[885, the building collapsed, water having 
damaged the brick foundation so that die 
walls fell in, crushing everything with it. 
\- this occurred on Sunday morning no lives 
were lost. In it^ place Mr. Killough erected 

..id substantial brick building, which lie 
now occupies. He also rents the second fi 
of an adjoining building, and has built a 
warehouse, sixtj five b) thirtj feet, across 
the street from hi^ store. Besides his busi- 
ness property he owns a line residence. Buy- 
ing the property of J. R. Melrvin on East 
Main street, lie lore down the brick house 
standing thereon, and erected, in its place a 
line two-Story frame resilience, which is sur- 
rounded by a large modern piazza and spa- 
cious, well-shaded grounds. It is one of the 
best and most attractive homes in the city. 

Mr. Killougll married Miss Delia BriggS, 
daughter of Uriah Briggs, of Delavan, Illi- 
nois, and to them was horn one child. Merna 
C, who was graduated in the Clinton high 
sch' 10I in [901. 

When the Civil war broke out Mr. Kil- 
lough desired to enlist, hut his parents re- 
fused their consent, believing him too young 
to enter the service. At length, in July, 
[863, he enlisted in the State Militia for one 
hundred days, and in [864 enlisted in the 
I 'nited States service Me is now a promi- 
nent member and past commander of the 
Grand Army Post at Clinton. In his re- 
ligious views he is liberal. His father's peo- 
ple were Presbyterians, while his mother's 
people were members of the Societj oi 
Friends. Politically Mr. Killough is a 
stanch Republican, ami has taken a very 
active and influential part in public affairs. 
During his residence in Clinton he served 



four years as county surveyor; in 1882 was 
elected supervisor, which office he held nine 
consecutive years; was school director seven 
wars; and in iS<><; was elected mayor of the 
city. During his administration of two years 
a number of very important improvements 
were made, including the paving of the 
square, lie takes an active interesl in all 
enterprises calculated to promote the general 
welfare. It is to such men that the west 
owes us prosperity and progress, and ii Clin- 
ton had more such men she would soon rank 
among the finest cities oi her size in the 
state. Mr. Killough is a past master of the 
Masonic Lodge, and also a member of the 
chapter, commandery and Eastern Star. 



F. E. PINKERTON. 

\s the founder and proprietor of the 
leading daily and weekly paper of Clinton, 
Mr. Pinkerton, during his short residence 
in this city has become prominently identi- 
fied with her business and social interests. 
lie was horn in Tremont, Schuylkill county, 
Pennsylvania. December _'o, [852, and is a 
s,.n of Colonel C. 1.. and Fann] (Singer) 
Pinkerton, and a grandson of George Pink- 
erton. who was also a native of the Key- 
st' >ne state. 

1 . .1. mel P. P. 1 'inkerfc in w as b >rn in 
Halifax. Pennsylvania, and received his 
early mental training in the public schools. 
For a while he engaged in teaching Put 
when a young man took up the study of law 
and later was admitted to the bar of the 
state. As a lawyer he obtained a wide- 
spread reputation and was sent to the legis- 
lature by the Republican party, of which 
political faith he was a strong advo- 
cate. During the Civil war he served on 




F. E. PINKERTON. 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



323 



the staff of Governor Curtis. He was an 
earnest and consistent member of the 
Methodist Episcopal church. His marriage 
with Miss Fanny Singer resulted in the birth 
of nine children, five of whom arc now liv- 
ing, namely: Margaret; F. E., our subject; 
Jane Mary: Edward K. : and Bertrand I ). 
The two latter arc residents of this state, 
the former is engaged in paper box manu- 
facturing in Chicago, while the latter is one 
of the editors and part owner of the News 
Herald, of Lincoln. Illinois. About a year 
previous to the death of our subject's fa 
ther, he emigrated west and the death of 
Loth he and his wife occurred in this state. 
F. E. Pinkerton availed himself of the 
common schools and of a night school and 
in this way obtained a good elementary edu- 
cation. While still at home he began learn- 
ing the trade of a printer, being for two 
years in the employ of the "Tremont News." 
The succeeding two years was spent at Ply- 
mouth. Pennsylvania, where he was em- 
ployed a~- a printer on the "Star." Thinking 
that a larger city offered better inducements, 
he secured a position as a compositor on the 
"Scrahtbn Republican," which position he 
retained for six months. At the end of that 
period he engaged in reportorial work on the 
"Scranton Times." where he remained an- 
other six mouths. He the:; became iden- 
tified with the Xichols,,,i Examiner, which 
paper he conducted for two years, or until 
1875. In that year he came west and lo- 
cated at Rantoul, where he gained posses- 
sion of the "Rantoul Journal." which he 
published for two years. Then in partner- 
ship with 11. E. Bullock, they consolidated 
the Journal and the "Rantoul News" ami 
established a new paper called "The Ran- 
toulian." Later he purchased his partner's 
interest and changed the name to "The Ran- 
toul PfCSS," which paper he conducted for 



eighteen years. In the publication of this pa- 
per, Mr. Pinkerton met with success and in 
[896 he disposed of it for four thousand 
dollars. This was in [895, and in May of 
the same year we find him a citizen of Clin- 

where he purchased the "Clinton Week- 
ly Public," which Ik- continued to publish 
for about six mouths. Thinking that Clin- 
ton offered a field for an evening daily pa- 
per, he established the "Clinton Daih Pub- 
lic," which he continued to publish until 
until April 15. moi. when he formed a 
partnership with his brother, B. E. Pink- 
erton, ami F. R. Cross, under the linn name 
of Pinkerton. Cross & Co. They then pur- 
chased the "Lincoln Daily News" and "The 
Weekly Herald." both of Lincoln. Illinois, 
which they consolidated and now publish 
under the name of "The Lincoln Daily 
News-Herald" and "The Weekly Herald." 
This company also continue the publication 
of the Clinton Daily and Weekly Public, 
which are under the direct supervision of 
our subject. In addition to his newspaper 
interests. Mr. Pinkerton is a half owner 
of the Paper Box Factory in Chicago, 
which is under the management of his 
bn 'ther. 

Mr. Pinkerton's venture has prosed a 
profitable one and his paper has become a 
power, not only as a newspaper, hut as a 
fearless exponent of the principles of the 
Republican party. 

In [88l Mr. Pinkerton was united in 
marriage with Miss Mollie E. Boise, of 
Rantoul, a daughter of J. J. and Lucy S. 
I',, use. Lor thirty-live wars Mr. Poise held 
the position of station agent for the Illinois 
Central. He is now deceased, hut his wife 
is still living and makes her home in Pan 
toul. 

To Mr .and Mrs. Pinkerton have been 
born the foil, , wing children : Charles, who 



324 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



has a position in his father's and uncle's 
box factory in Chicago; Francis; Leon; 
and Maisie, all at home. 

Fraternally Mr. Pinkerton is a member of 
the Modern Woodmen of America and the 
Knights of Pythias, both of Clinton. Both 
Mr. and Mrs. Pinkerton attend the Method- 
ist Episcopal church. In polities Mr. Pink 
ton i^ an ardent supporter of the men and 
measures of the Republican party, and while 
a resident of Rantoul was secretarj of the 
ucation for six years. 
Since coming to Clinton our subject has 
always been found ready and willing to do 
all in his power to advance any cause which 
promised to he for the public good. lie 
was one of the thirteen gentlemen that or- 
ganized the Clinton Chautauqua and has 
never hesitated to use the columns ol his 
paper to promote its interests. 



JAMES VV. 1IAM.MI I 

Among the leading citizens of DeWitt 
county who have been identified with its in- 
terests since pioneer days is James \\ . I lam- 
mitt, who dates his residence here from < >c- 
tober, [833. He has by honest toil and in- 
dustry succeeded in acquiring a handsome 
competence, which now enables him to spend 
the sunset of life in ease anil retirement on 
the old homestead on section iS. Waynesville 
township, which is now carried on by his 
son ( )scar. 

A native of Ohio. Mr. 1 lammitt was horn 
in Morgan county. July 11. [818, and is a 
5 tnuel 1 lammitt. whose birth oc- 
curred near Wheeling, West Virginia, in 
[789. His paternal grandfather, Benja- 
min Hammitt, was born in Rhode Island of 

tch ancestry and at an early day removed 



to West Virginia, where he died during the 
infancy of his son Samuel. On reaching 
manhood the latter left his native state and 
went to Ohio, living first in Muskingum 
county and later in Morgan county, where 
he opened up and improved a farm. In 
[833 he came to Illinois, and settled in what 
is now Waynesville township, DeWitt coun- 
ty, where he entered land and purchased a 
tract of eight) acres. In course of time lie 
had a good farm of one hundred and sixty 
acres, on which he made his home until 
called to his final rest in [862. at the a-e 
of seventj three years, llis wife, who bore 
the maiden name of Catherine McElhiney, 
passed awaj some years previously. 

James W. I lammitt was a lad of fifteen 
years when he came with the family to this 
county, and he rendered his father valuable 

istance in opening up the farm, remain- 
ing at home until twenty-seven years of age. 
lie was then married in Logan county. Illi- 
nois, ( (ctober <>. [845, to Miss Susan Brock, 
a native of Indiana and a daughter of An- 
drew Brock, "in- of the first settlers of this 
section of the state, having located here in 
[829. Mrs. Hammitt was reared in Illinois 
and was to her husband a faithful companion 
and helpmeet for near fifty-one years. She- 
died in [896 and was laid to rest in Waynes- 
ville cemetery. Air. Hammitt has nine chil- 
dren living, namely: Sebastian, a farmer of 
Iowa; Hannah, wife of < >. II. Buck, of Mc- 
Lean county. Illinois; Guy, a resident of At- 
lanta. I - ; Martin, who . iwns and 
operates the -Id I lammitt homestead; I at, 
a resident of Atlanta; < >scar, who was mar- 
ried in June. 100 1. to Emma McMillen, of 
Waynesville township, and is now carrying 
on the home farm: James, a farmer of Mc- 
Lean county; Benjamin, who operates a part 
. if the In ime farm : and Katie, wife of George 
Smith, of Waynesville, whose sketch ap- 



Til]-. BIOCKAPHICAL RECORD. 



325 



pear- elsewhere in this work. John died at 
the age of twenty-four year-, and two chil- 
dren died in infancy. 

Alter his marriage Mr. llammitt located 
on section 18, Waynesville township, where 
he entered forty acre- of land, and at once 
began the improvement and cultivation of 
that place Subsequently he entered an ad- 
joining eighty-acre tract, and still later 
bought more land from time to time until 
he had four hundred and sixty acre- on 

ti >ns t8 and [9, Waynesville township, 
DeW'itt county, and eighty acres in Logan 
county. His lirst home wu a log cabin, 

which in later years was replaced by a g 1 

frame residence: good barns and outbuild- 
ings were also erected, fruit and -hade tret- 
were set out and many other improvements 
made to the place. There are now two sets 
of buildings upon the farm and everything is 
in first-class order. Mr. llammitt contin- 
ued to actively engage in farming until 1895, 
when he rented his land to his sons and has 
since lived a retired life, enjoying- a well 
earned rest. 

The Democratic party has always found 
in Mr. llammitt a stanch supporter of its 
principles, and he has never failed to 
for each presidential candidate of that party 
since casting his first ballot for Martin Van 
Buren in 1840. He has d< me all in his power 
to advance the educational interests of his 
community, and for many years efficiently 
served as a member of the school board and 
president of the district For the long period 
Jit years he has made his home in 
DeWitt county, during which time he has 
-ecu \ illages and cities spring up within its 
borders, the wild land transformed into 
beautiful homes and farms, railroad- built 
and the telegraphs and telephones intro- 
duced. Deer and other wild game was very 
plentiful when he first came to the county. 



At that time the nearest postoffice was at 
Bloomington, twenty mile- away, (due his 
father went to the office for the mail and 
finding the postmaster out he hunted him up 
on the street. When found that official took 
off his hat. in which he carried a hunch of 
letters, and from the number -elected the one 
intended for Mr. Hammitt, who then paid 
the twenty-five cents charged a- postage at 
that time. 

In the spring of [go] a cyclone struck a 
granary, cow house and two corn cribs and 
-entered them all over the farm besides de- 
stroying shade trees and doing other dam- 
age. 

— ■» • » — 

TRUMAN MASON. 

The subject of this -ketch, who was tor 
many year- actively identified with the ag- 
ricultural interests of Wilson township, and 
i- now living a retired life in Wapella, was 
born July 10. 1842, in Logan county. Illin 
011 the Tazewell county line. His father, 
Oliver Mason, was horn in Pennsylvania, 
about 1S17. and was a son of Truman Ma- 

. who brought his family to Illinois about 
1827 and first settled in Sangamon county, 
where he -pent two years, and then removed 
to Logan county, where he purchased land 
and opened up a farm on the Tazewell coun- 
ty line. His la-t days, however, were spent 
in McLean county. Oliver Mason grew to 
manhood in Logan county, and in later years 
he became the owner of a well-improved 
ami valuable farm of -i\ hundred and twen- 
ty acres in Tazewell county, being "lie of 
the substantial farmers of his locality. He 
married [sabel Adams, a native of Tennes- 
see, who. when a child, came with her par- 
ent- to Illinois prior to the Black Hawk war. 
Her father. Captain John Adams, command- 



326 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



ed a company in that war. and was killed in 
Stillman's defeat near Chicago, where a 
monumenl is now being erected to his mem 
ory. lie was also a native of Tennessee. 
The father of < >nr subject spent his last years 
in Armington, Illinois, where he died in 
iN<>_\ and the mother passed awaj in [898. 
Thej were the parents of eight children, 
sex en now living, five sons and two daugh- 
ters. 

Truman Mason, the oldesl child, passed 

his boyh 1 and youth on the old homestead 

in Tazewell county, and received a good 
practical education in the local schools. Dur- 
ing the Civil war he manifested his patriot 
ism by enlisting in Vugust, [863, in 
pany A, One Hundred and Seventeenth Illi- 
nois \ olunteer Infantry, which was assigned 
to the Army of the Tennessee. For about 
two years he did guard duty at Memphis, but 
was also in a number of engagements, in- 
cluding the battles of Holl; Springs and 
Pleasanl Hill, Louisiana. For si\ months 
lie was ill in the hospital at tjnincv. Illinois, 
and at the close of the war was honorably 

discharged in June. [865. The following 

two years were spent upon his father' farm. 

In McLean county, on the 1 ith of 1 d 
tober, r866, Mr. Mason was united in mar- 
riage with Miss Jane L. Heard, who was 
horn in I (hio, but was reared and educated in 
Tazewell and McLean counties, this state, 
where her father. William II. Heard, was 
engaged in farming. Three children blessed 
this union, namely: Delia, now the wife of 
S. F. Merritield. who is now operating the 
Mason farm; I >li\er 1'.. at home: and Dora. 
wife of John A. llnrd. of Wilson township. 
1 >c\\ itt county. 

For one year after his marriage Mr. Ma- 
son continued to engage in farming in Taze- 
well county, but in the fall of [867 removed 
to a farm in Wilson township, this county. 



and to its improvement and cultivation de- 
voted his time and attention for some years. 
lie erected good and substantial buildings 
upon the place and converted it into one oi 
the most highly cultivated and desirable 
farms of its size in that locality. It consisted 
of oik- hundred and twenty acres. In C899 
Mr. Mason removed to W'apella and bought 
a nice residence, where he has since lived re- 
tired, enjoying the fruits of former toil. 

By his ballot Mr. Mason has supported 
the Republican party and its principles since 
casting his first presidential vote for General 
(J. S. Grant in [868, and he has ever taken 
an active and commendable interest in public 

affairs. Me served several terms as com- 
missioner of highways, and for some years 

was a member of the school hoard, having 
always supported all enterprises calculated to 
advance the moral, educational or material 
welfare of his community. Jle attends the 

Christian church and is a charter member 
"f Mapella I'ost, ( ,. .\. R. As a public-spir- 
ited and progressive citizen he has always 

been found as true to his duties of citi 1 
ship in days of peace as when he followed 
the old flag to victory on southern battle- 
fields. 

■» • » 

THOMAS M. MADDOX. 

For almost half a century Thomas M. 
Maddox has been identified with the inter- 
ests of DeWitl county, and is still success- 
fully engaged in farming on section 20, 
Barnett township. He was born in Gibson 
county, Indiana, on the 1st of September, 
1 Sic;. I lis father. Dr. John W. Maddox, 
was a native of Kentucky, but at an early 
day removed to Indiana, where he married 
Mrs. Jane 1 Montgomery) Warrick, whose 
tirst husband was killed by the Indians in 




T. M. MADDOX. 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



520. 



the battle of Tippecanoe on the Wabash 
river. For a few years the Doctor was en- 
gaged in practice in Gibson county, and 
from there he went to the Red River coun- 
try. He subsequently came to Illinois and 
purchased a place in Sangamon county, 

■ of Springfield, but died there before the 
arrival of his family. When the news of 
his death reached them they decided to re- 
main in Gibson county, Indiana, and there 
the mother reared her three children, of 
whom Thomas M. was the onlj .-on and 
youngest child. 

Our subject received a fair common- 
school education, and at the age of fourteen 
year- started out to make his own way in 
the world. He was married in his native 
county in October, [842, to Miss Elizabeth 
Teal, who was al>o born there and was a 
daughter of Adam Teal. They began their 
domestic life in Gibson county upon land 
which Mr. Maddox had leased, hut at the 
end of two year- he sold his lease and 
came to Illinois in [846. lie first lo- 
cated in Logan county, where he bought 
eighty acre- of land and entered forty acre- 
more, and to the improvement and cultiva- 
tion of that place he devoted hi- attention 
for five years. Selling out in [852, he came 

DeWitt county and purchased his pri 
ent farm of one hundred and sixty acres 
on section 20, Harnett township. Only a 
few acres in one corner was then under 
cultivation, hut soon acre after acre was 
placed under the plow until it was all broken. 
Hi- first home wa- a -mall frame re-idei 
which in later year- was replaced by a more 
commodious dwelling. He also built a 
large barn, set out fruit and shade trees, 
and made many other valuable improve- 
ments upon the place. He also owned an- 
other farm of one hundred acre-, which i- 
now the property of hi- son, Joseph T., and 

15 



in connection with general farming he suc- 
cessfully engaged in the raising of cattle, 
!'.• irses, sheep and hi g 

Mr. Maddox'- first wife, who was to him 
a faithful companion and helpmeel for 
thirty-eight year-, died June 13, 1880, leav- 
ing three children, namely: John \\ .. who 
1- now carrying on a ranch in Colorado; 
Joseph T., whose sketch appears el-ewherc 
in this work; and Nancy Jane, wife of James 
Hall, a farmer of llallville. DeWitt count). 
Mr. Maddox was again married in Logan 
county, Illinois, July 14. [881, hi- -croud 
union being with Miss Ann Sumner, who 
was Lorn in the same neighborhood a- her 
husband in Gibson county, Indiana, but 
was reared in Logan county, this state, and 
prior to the death of hi- first wife lived in 
the family for some year-. 

Politically Mr. Maddox has been a life- 
long Democrat, and cast his first presiden- 
tial vote for Martin Van Buren in 1X40. 
lie has never missed a presidential election 
since that time though he once had to he car- 
ried to the polls on account of a broken leg. 
For three consecutive terms he was an influ- 
ential member of the county hoard of super- 
visors and served on several important com- 
mittee-, lie ha- also filled the offices of 
highway commissioner and school director, 
and has ever made a faithful and efficient 
officer. Religiously his wife is a member 
of the Cumberland Presbyterian church, 
and both are highly respected and esteemed 
by all who km >vv them. 



J( IHN HENRY McCORD. 

( hie of the most beautiful a ntntry hi imes 
I >e\\ itl county i- that of John 1 1. Mc- 
ilture and artistic taste of it- 



330 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



cupants being reflected in its appointments, 
while .1 gracious hospitality adds a charm to 
its material comforts. Mr. McCord, who is 
a successful farmer and stock-dealer oi 
Santa Anna township, was born December 
Hi. [838, on the farm where he now resides, 
and is the only child of William Young and 
1 [arriel 1 Weedman ) McCord. 

( In the paternal side he traces his ances- 
try hark to Robert MacCord, a highlander 
and chief of his clan, who was killed in the 
battle of Killecrankie Pass, Scotland, aboul 
[689, during the rebellion. I lis son, John 
MacCord, the next in direct descent in our 
subject, took part in numerous wars and 
died in Scotland about [715 or 1717. I lis 
sons were John, David, William, Robert, 
Samuel. Benjamin and James, who after 
their father's death went to Stew artSt >w n. 

mtj Tyrone, Ireland, and about 17-'" 
John, David and William came to the new 
world and located in Pennsylvania. John 
later removed to North Carolina, while 
David and William were killed by the In- 
dians. The coat of arms of tins family was 
a shield i.f gold and black and white, with 
three hearts and three lance heads on it. sur- 
mounted by a clos r ,i helmet. Families of 
this name still reside in County Tyrone, Ire- 
land, and all are Presbyterians. 

James McCord, great-grandfather of our 
subject, was born in County Tyrone, Ire- 
land, in 1739, and was four years "Id when 
he came to America with his father. Robert 
McCord, who was one of the seven brothers 
previously mentioned. After the death of 
their father these brothers changed the fam- 
ily name from MacCord \<> McCord. James 
McCord spent his early life in Lancaster 
county, Pennsylvania, and from there went 
io Wilkes county, North Carolina, where he 
married Miss Jane Scroggs, who was also 



oi Scotch descent. Subsequently he removed 
to Iredell county, the same state, and from 
there to Overton county. Tennessee, where 
he died November 4. [824. He served as 
general wagonmaster in the Revolutionary 
war under Washington, llis wife died No- 
vember t_\ [789. 

In the family of this worthy couple were 
nine children, one of whom was lames Mc- 
Cord. the grandfather of our subject, lie 
was born in Wilkes county, North Carolina, 
February 22, 1 77<>. and was married in 
( Iverton county. Tennessee, March 29, 1X04, 
to Miss Mary Moore, a daughter of Charles 
and Sarah t Smith I Moore, the former of 
Welsh and the latter . if Scotch descent. I ler 
lather was a cooper by trade, and during the 
Revolutionary war made canteens for the 
army. After their marriage Mr. and Mrs. 
McCord located at Peterman's Bend on the 
()hies river in Overton county, Tennessee, 
where all their children were horn. About 
1 Si - they removed to Spring (reek, and in 
1832 came to DeWitl county, Illinois, locat- 
ing on a farm in DeWitt township now 
owned by S. J. Thomas. At that time there 
were only six families in that locality, these 
being Dennis Hurley, John Weedman. Rich- 
ard Kirby, William Daley, Robert Cum- 
mings, James M. Porter, who were supposed 
to be the original settlers. The first home of 
the McCord family was a double log house 
with a hall through the center and a fireplace 
at each end. In later years this was replaced 
by a good frame residence, which is still 
standing. I [ere the grandfather of our sub- 
ject died December ,}. [852, and his wife, 
who was horn in Granville county, North 

rolina, October 29, \jj<). passed away 
May 23, [858. Their children were Charles ; 
James W. : William Y.. the father of our 
subject; Mi's. Sarah Pool; Mrs. Martha 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



33i 



Shinkle; Mrs. Hannah Wakefield and John, 

twins: Mrs. Mary Heath: and Mrs. Eliza- 
beth Brown. 

William V. McCord was horn in Over- 
ton county, Tennessee, October 29, 1816, 
and accompanied his parents on their re- 
moval to DeWitt county. In 1837 he en- 
tered eighty acres of land on section 31, 
Santa Anna township, where our sub j eel 
now lives, and to that tract he added until he 
had two hundred acres. Hi- first heme. 
which was a small house, was destroyed by 
tire in iSn_>. and he then erected a commodi- 
ous and hands, mie brick residence — one of 
the largest and finest in the county. He cut 
black walnut timber and had it kiln dried for 

the inside w 1 work, making an elegant 

finish, as it is all hand work and is still in a 
fine condition. In 186] he set cut fruit and 
shade trees, which now spread wide their 
branches and add greatly to the beauty and 
attractive appearance of the place. This de- 
lightful home is t>n a natural elevation, one 
mile west of Farmer City, and it invariably 
attracts the eye of the passing traveler. In 
early days, after his crops were harvested, 
William V. McCord used to. take much en- 
joyment with his neighbors in hunting, and 
owned several tine horse- to be used on such 
occasions, lie was a fine rifle shot, and deer 
and other wild game was then plentiful. He 
and his neighbors would club together to rid 
the country of the wolves which killed their 
Stock, ami he i- -aid to have brought down 
more deer and wolves than any other man in 
this section of the state. lie fenced off a 
park upon John Weedman'* farm, in which 
he kept over twenty deer. When young ami 
getting a -tart in life he often hauled his 

produce to Chicago, ami then took g 1- 

from there to St. Louis by wagon, a- that 
was the only means of transportation at that 
time. It required ab Ut three weeks to make 



these trips. In company with John Weed- 
man. Jr., he erected a flouring mill at a cost 
of twenty thousand dollars — the tir-t in 
Farmer City, it being located near the pr< 
rut water work-, but after running it nine 
year- he disposed of hi- interests, and later 
it was destroyed bj lire. Mr. McCord was a 
Stanch Republican and took a very active 
and prominent part in political affair-, lie 
served as town-hip assessor a number of 
year-, during which time the Indianapolis, 
Bloomington & Peoria Railroad, now known 
as the Big Four, was built, and he wa- one 
of the directors up to the time of his death, 
lie served as justice of the peace twenty 
years, and assessor seventeen years, ami his 
official duties were always discharged with 
credit to himself ami to the entire -atisfac- 
tion of his constituents. He was an active 
member of the Methodist Episcopal church 
at farmer City, with which he was officially 
connected, and gave liberally to the erection 
of both the old and new churches. As a citi- 
zen of the community in which he so long 
lived and was so active, he was highly re- 
spected for his genuine worth, enjoyed the 
confidence of all who knew him and was re- 
garded as a man of excellent judgment. 

On the Nth of February, [838, William 
Y. McCord married Mi-- Harriet Weed- 
man, a daughter of John and Rachel i Wil- 
son) Weedman. Her father was born in 
Pennsylvania in 1700. and wa- a -on of 
Weedman. who was of German and 
English extraction. At an early day John 
Weedman removed to Ohio; and in [830 
came t. ■ 1 11 i it .i-. li eating in Rand, ilph ( in i\ e, 
McLean county, first, but settling in Hur- 
ley's Grove, Santa Anna township, DeWitt 
county, in [835. Here he spent the re- 
mainder of his life as a farmer and -tock- 
raiser and died at an advanced age. He 
married Rachel Wilson, a daughter of Asa 



33 = 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



Wilson, who was a native of Maryland, and 
from that state removed to Ohio and later 
to Illinois. Mr. and Mrs. Weedman had ten 
children, namely: Asa, Harriet, George, 
Amos, John, Isaiah. Luanda. Eliza E., Za- 
dok and Thomas S. The father of our sub- 
ject died January [8, [880, at the age of 
sixty-three, and the mother in September, 
i S< 1 7 . at the age of seventy-four years. 

Reared on the home [arm, John II. Mc 
Cord acquired his elementary education in a 
log school house of the neighborhood, and 
later attended the Wesleyan University at 
Bloomington for one year. Hi- life has 
been di i farming and stock-raising, 

with the exception of the nine years when he 
was with his father in the milling busim 
at Farmer City. II* succeeded to the old 
homestead, and has added to it until he now 
owns three hundred and twent) acres of 
land, under a higli state of cultivation. The 
fields. de\ i >;ed u i the raising of grain, he m iw 
rents, while he keeps the pasture laud for 
his st< ick, de\ i 'tin- his entire time and atten- 
tion to the raisin- of standard-bred hoi 
and a high grade of cattle. H nnually 

threi ds of cattle and In igs for 

the market. 

Mr. McCord has been twice married, his 
tirst wife being Miss Sarah A. Slick. Her 
grandparents. Philip and Mary (Panteli 
Slick, were earl) settlers of (his state, where 
the former died at the age of sevent) 
years, the latter at the age of eighty-two. 
Their children were Thomas, William. 
Isaiah. Samuel. John. Margaret and Mary. 
Thomas Slick. Mrs. McCord" s father, was 
horn in Frederick county. Maryland, and 
wedded Miss Rachel Moss, also a nativt 
that state and a daughter of Lewis and 
Elizabeth (Dill) Moss. They settled in 
Santa Anna township. DeWitt county, in 

j. and ten vears later removed to Farmer 



City, where Mr. Slick died in 1889, at the 
age of eighty-one years, hut his wife is 
still living. They had eight children, iiame- 
1\ : Mrs. Mary E. Wisegarver, Mrs. Aman- 
da Thew . 1 lamilt< >n. Mrs. Sarah A. Met '< >rd, 
Mis. Eliza Graft, Mrs. Almeda Weedman, 
Mrs. Jane Cook and Marion I >. Mrs. Mc- 
Cord, who was horn in [840, died August 
1SS4. leaving three children, as follows: 
1 1 1 Lora Xettie. now deceased, married 
William A. Cummings and had five children, 
I ikv. Vida, Shannah, Laura and Harriet. 
> _• 1 William II.. after graduating at the 
Farmer City high school, entered the Illi- 
nois University at Champaign, where he 
graduated in mechanical engineering, and 
then went to California to follow his pro- 
fession. I le at i ipidly that he soon 
found it advisable to take a more advanced 
course, and for that purpose attended Stan- 
ford University of California, where he was 
also graduated, lie is now superintendent 
of a verj large gold mine near Nevada City, 
California, lie married Frances Black and 
they have one son, John Thomas. (3) Ruin- 
is at home with her father. For his second 
wife Mi. McCord married Miss Annie Lee, 
daughter of Clinton Lee. and to them have 
been horn two children. John Merle and Inez. 
Socially Mr. McCord 1- a member of the 
Knights of Pythias fraternity and religiously 
is a member of the Methodist Episcopal 
church, in which he has served as steward 
and trustee. The Republican party has al- 
ways found in him an ardent supporter, hut 
he has never cared for political honors, 
has an enviable reputation as a straightfor- 
ward, honorable business man. and his ad- 
vice and counsel are often sought by his 
neighbors and many friends, ivho recogfiize 
his ability and sound judgment in business 
affairs. He is a man of influence in his 
community and quite popular. 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



333 



kCKLEY & COMPANY. 

The firm of Cackle) & Company are 

]>r. ■prit-t- -r> of what is known as the 

i on the east side of the square, 
which is the la- eery, provision and 

meat market establishment ii"t only in 

nton but in DeWitt comity. Both 
men of - qualities, who-, - in 

life is due entirely to their own well-directed 

rts. By straightforward, honorable 

'ing they have built up an excellent 
trade, and rank to-day among the leading 
business men < if the city. 

T. W. Cackley, the senior member 
the firm, was b>rn in Pocohontas county. 
Virginia. May 10. : 857 F. 

Cackley, df this county. At the age of 
thirteen years he lost his mother, and com- 
menced clerking for his uncle, in wh 
employ he remained t\ - He next 

accepted a position with Wilson & Com- 
pany, grocers, as clerk in the t which 
he is now one of the proprietors, and re- 
mained with that firm eleven years. Dur- 
g this time he saved enough money with 
which to embark in business tor himself. 

iblishing the first free delivery retail oil 
>s in Clinton, and built up 
trade. With the assistance of his uncle he 
purchased a team and fitted up a delivery 
wagon, and continued to successfully fol- 
low that bu<ines- for five years, during the 
last year of which he cleared three thou- 
sand dollars. With Thomas L. Kelly he 
then purchased the Ixn.t and shoe store 
1). <i. day. and carried on business where 
Latterty & Company is now located until 

13, when he sold out. In January. 18 
he and Mr. Kelly bought out L. Watt, who 
conducted a small grocery at their present 
location, and started in that business with 



;t thirty-eight hundred dol- 
lars, but to-day their <t'*.k and fixtures 
amount to ten thousand. Their store build- 

- erected by C. H. Ml 
and was tirst occupied by Mr. Crosby, and 
later by Wilson & Company, and still later 
by L. Watt. Since it came into sion 

of Cackley ec Company it has been remod- 

I and enlarged. I tended to Mon- 

roe- streel - that it i> now one hundred 
and thirty-two feet deep and twenty-two 
feet wide. It has a tine concrete basement 
with cold si S nd elevator, and is fitted 
up with the latest improvements, such 

ers. marble ectric fans, etc. In 

connection with the meat market the firm 
carry all kinds of poultry and game in 

- 'ii. They have the finest window dis- 
play of any gri >cerv in the city, and their 
floors are rat proof. They have quite 

trade, in addition to their 
retail business, and employ fourteen assist- 
ants. while two double teams with tine deliv- 
erv wagons are kept in constant use. 

Mr. Cackley was united in marriage 
with Miss 5 lie J. Phares, daughter of 
John A. Phares. whose sketch appears on 
another page of this volume. Our subject 
purchased the Cro-by property on East 
Washington street, and when the old house 
standing thereon was destroyed by fire he 
built a tine, large, modern residence and re- 
modled the stable, making a very desirable 
place. He is a member of the blue lodge, 
chapter, council and commandery of the 
Masonic order, and in connection with his 
win 50 a member of the Eastern Star 

chapter of the same fraternity. He has 
been president of the blue lodge ten years. 
In his religion- views lie i- a Presbyterian, 
and in polil stanch Republican. 

Thomas L. Kellv. of the firm ><i Cack- 



334 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



ley & Company, was born in Lexington, 
Kentucky, January [2, [844, his parents 
being John and Mary Elizabeth (Sharp) 
Kelly. The father died at the age of forty- 
Jive years, but the mother is still living and 
now makes her home with her son in Clin- 
ton. In the family were seven children, of 
whom Wesley also resides in Clinton. 

At the age of fourteen years Thomas L. 
Kellv commenced learning photography, but 
not liking the business, he soon turned his 
attention to farming, which he followed 
four years, lie next clerked in a grocery 
stoic iii Lexington. Kentucky, five years, 
and after coming to Clinton, Illinois, in 

[878, followed the same pursuit with Reu 
lien Sackett for a year and a half. In part- 
nership with his brother he then opened a 
restaurant, which they conducted under the 
linn name of Kelly Brothers until [889. 

The following year he became connected 

with T. W. Cackle) in tin- 1 1 and shoe 

business, as previouslj stated, and together 
they have since carried on operations. \\ ith 
Mr. tarter he laid out the Kelly addition 
to Clinton, having purchased ten acres oi 
land of C. II. Mo.. re. In j886 he built the 
present Mclntire cottage on West Washing- 
ton street, and the following year erected the 
pleasant residence he now occupies at the 
crner of Washington and North Center 
streets, which was formerly a business coi 
ner, having been the site of a store, tanyard 
and blacksmith shop, 

Mr. Kelly married Miss Fanny M. Ad- 
ams, a native of Clark county, Kentucky, 
anil a daughter of John Q. Adams. In his 
political affiliation he is a Democrat, and in 
his social relations is a member of the Inde- 
pendent < >rder of Foresters and the Knights 
of Pythias, having served as chancellor and 
represented his lodge in the grand lodge of 
the latter order. Like his partner in busi- 



ness, Mr. Kelly is a self-made man, and 
both deserve great credit for the sueeess 
that they have achieved in life. 



W. SO >TT HARROLD. 

Prominent among the successful farm- 
ers and stock-raisers of W'apella township 
is W. Scott Harrold, who owns and op- 
erates a line farm of two hundred and 
twenty-one acres, pleasantly located on sec 
tion .}_' within two miles of the village of 
W'apella. Me is a native of this county, 
horn on the old home farm near where he 
now resides, January 8, 1841;, and is a 
worthy representative of a prominent pio- 
neer family. 

Isam Harrold, the father of our sub- 
ject, was horn in North Carolina in 1N15, 
and was a son of Jonathan Harrold, who 
removed with his family to Virginia in 
1825, and a few years later went to Indiana. 
where he opened up a farm, making his 
home there for a few years. In [833 he 
came to Illinois, and made a permanent lo 
cation near Waynesville, DeWitt county. 
Mere Lain llarrold entire. 1 several tracts 
of land, including that owned and occupied 
by our subject, and from the wild land de- 
veloped a good farm in W'apella township, 
becoming one of the most substantia] agri- 
culturists ,,f his community. Me wedded 
Miss Mary Ann Lisenhy. who was horn in 
Monroe county. Kentucky, hut was reared 
in DeWitt county. Illinois, from the age of 
nine years, her father. Alexander Lisenhy, 
being one of the pioneers of this region, 
having located here the winter of the deep 
snow. Mr. Harrold died February -•<>. 
1893, and his wife passed away in Sep- 
tember, [891, both heing laid to rest in the 
Crum cemetery. 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 






- :t Harrold, of this review, is the only 
son ami fourth in order "t" birth in their 
family <<i six children, the Others being 
Louisa, wife of J. II. Farris, of Washing- 
ton county, I«>\\a: Rebecca, wife of Allied 
Wilson, "f Wapella township, this county: 
Ruth, wife of J. H. Borders, of the same 
township; Mr-. Nancy Troxel, a widow, 
who owns the old home farm but now re- 
sides in Normal, Illinois: and Laura, wife 
of C. J. Riddle, a thrifty farmer of Wapella 
township. 

On the old home farm our subject grew 
to manhood, and obtained his education in 
the district schools of the neighborhood and 
the schools of Wapella. During his minor- 
ity he gave his father the benefits of his 
labor, and at the age of twenty-one took 
charge of the farm. After his marriage be 
located on the farm where he now resides, 
built a good residence, barn and outbuild- 
ings and made many other improvements 
which add greatly to the value and attract- 
ive appearance of the place. In addition to 

eral farming he carries on stock-raising 
with marked success, and i- to-day one of 
the nn >st prosperous ami substantial citizens 
of Wapella township. 

Mr. Harrold has been twice married, 
bis tirst wife being Miss Eveline Cantrell, 
who was born in Waynesville township, this 
county, and died here June i_\ 1885, leav- 
ing three children, namely: Roy M.. who 
i- now married and engaged in farming in 
this county: I'.erzie A., who was educated at 
the Clinton high school and the State Nor- 
mal School, at Normal, Illinois, and i- now 
one of the successful teachers of DeWitt 
county: and Bernice, at home. 

On the 30th of December, [886, Mr. 
Harrold was united in marriage with Miss 
Alice King, also a native of DeWitt count)', 
and a daughter of Robert King, who was 



one of the early settlers here. She was 
educated in the public schools of Waynes- 
ville and LeRoy ami the State Normal 
School, and prior to her marriage SUCO 
fully engaged in teaching for several years. 
The children born of this union are Helen 
and Welby K. Mr-. Harrold i- an earnest 
member of the Methodist Episcopal church 
of Wapella and its auxiliary societies, and 

in active worker in the Sunday-school. 

The Republican party has always found 
in Mr. Harrold a stanch supporter of its 
principle- since he cast hi- tirst presidential 
vote for General I". S. Grant in [872, but 
he ha- never cared for office, preferring to 
give his entire time and attention to his 
business affairs. He was elected, however, 
and efficiently served as president of the 
board of township trustees for some years, 
and he has never withheld his support from 
any enterprise having for its object the 

d of tin' community in which he lives. 
He has witnessed the wonderful develop- 
ment and progress that has been made in 
this section of the state during the past half 
century, and has ever borne bis part in the 
work of upbuilding, s, , that he is accounted 
one of the most useful and valued citizens 
of Wapella township. 



ARTHUR M( >ORE. 



Arthur Moore, of Clinton, is the only 
son of the late C. II. Moore, who w; 
many year- prominently identified with the 
interests of Clinton, and i- represented on 
another page of this volume. Our subject 
wa- born in Tremont, Tazewell county, Il- 
linois. September 28, [846, but was reared 
in Clinton, a- the family removed to this 
during his childhood. He received a 



336 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



g ! collegiate education and a thorough 

business training, his time being de- 
voted to assisting his father in looking 
ter his agricultural interests when not in 
school, IK- gave such strict attention to 
business that on attaining his majority he 
was well prepared to begin the battle of 
life for himself, having made- a close study 
of the precepts and practice- of our ah 
financiers. Preferring an independent ca- 
reer, he accepted a position with Magill 
Brothers at twelve dollars per month and 
board, much against In- father's wishes, 
hut ere long was prevailed upon t" enter 
his father's office a- private secretary. Later 
he was made superintendent of his father'- 
vast estate, having charge of In- farms, 
stock, etc. lie oversaw the laying of i 
five hundred miles of tiling, but this ne< 
sitated his being out in all kind- of weather. 
which finally impaired hi- health and 
was compelled t" seek a change of climate. 
Since hi- father'- death, however, he has 
made hi- heme uninterruptedly in Clinton, 
that he may have better control of the vast 
interests left t.> him. Here he owns a beau- 
tiful residence, which was begun bj hi- la- 
ther and i- constructed of brick. In [854 
the real' wall was blown down, but wa- re- 
built the following year, ami in 1867 the 
building wa- enlarged and improved, mak- 
ing a commodious and hand-Mine residence, 
1. ne ..I the finest in the country. It is sur- 
rounded by a spacious and well-kept lawn 
and shady walk- and drives. In his hi 
farm Mr. Moore ha- -i\ hundred acre- of 
land, and this i- only one pf the main line 
farm- which he own- in DeWitt county. 
lie has always been a very active and ener- 
getic man. and has been able to carry for- 
ward to a successful completion whatever 
he has undertaken. 

The highly accomplished lady who now 



hears the name of Mrs. Moore was in her 
maidenhood Miss Mary C. Piper, a daugh- 
ter of Orlando F. and Mary V 1 Hawkins) 
Piper, "f Macomb, McDonough county, Il- 
linois. Her father was born in Palestine, 
Illinois, and from there removed to La 
Porte, Indiana. lie died at Macomb in the 
fall mi' [890, at the age of seyent} eight 
years, hut the mother is still living at the 
age of seventy-three. They were tin- par- 
ent- mi' eight children, namely: Edward, 
deceased; Mice 1'..; Mary C. ; Annie, de 
ceased; Walter I... deceased; Charles \V.. 
deceased; Lewis; and Orlando II. The 
three -mii- and one daughter died of typhoid 
ic\cw hut at different time-. Mr. Moore's 
home ha- been a very happy one. lie has 
always taken great pride in keeping high 
grade cattle and horses, and ha- -Mine line 
specimens upon hi- place. Public affairs 
have claimed his attention at different 
times, and he ha- served a- deputy sheriff 
under Thomas Gardner. In [900 he was 
elected county surveyor and made J. S 
Brown hi- deputy, lie take- a deep inter- 
est in everything pertaining to the public 
welfare of his city and county, ami with- 
hold- hi- support from no enterprise cal- 
culated to prove m|' public benefit. 



FAMES HIRST. 



lame- llir-t. a prominent retired farmer 
now living in Farmer City, ha- been a resi- 
lient of DeWitt county since i<\-v He was 
born near Leeds, England, January X. iS_>N. 
and i- a son of Edward and Hannah llir-t. 
The father was born in Huderslield. near 
Hull, and belonged to a good old English 
family. He served in the army under the 
Duke Mt' Wellington, and participated in the- 




JAMES HIRST. 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



339 



battle of Water!. »i. His business «;i~ that 
of a broadcloth manufacturer. In 1840 he 
came to America, accompanied by his wife 
and nine children. His wife was in poor 
health, and believing that an ocean voyage 
ami a change of climate would prove bene- 
ficial they crossed the Atlantic, but she died 
in 1842, at the age of sixty-two years. Her 
birth occurred in Dublin, Ireland. Her 
children were: John: Mary, who remained 
in England; William; Henry. Edward, who 
was in the same company and regiment as 
our subject, and was killed at the battle of 
Deep Bottom, Virginia, August i_\ 1864, 
after serving three years: Eliza; James; 
Eli; Maria: Hannah: and two who died 
in infancy. < >ur subject and his sister, 
Maria, are the only ones now living. She 
now resides in Springfield, Ohio. For his 
second wife the father married a Miss Sams. 
by whom he had one son. George W. The 
lather owned and operated a farm in Ed- 
wards county. Illinois, until called to his 
final rest in 1846, at the age of seventy year-. 
The subject of this sketch accompanied 
his parents on their emigration to the United. 
State-, and grew to manhood in Edwards 
count}'. Illinois. At the age of twenty he 
went to Clark county. Ohio, where he fol- 
lowed farming until 1853, and then cam< 
DeW'itt county. Illinois, where he worked 
for John Weedman until his marriage. He 
then rented land and 1 g in farm 

on his own account until the Civil war 
broke out. 

In October, 1861, Mr. Hirst enlisted in 
mpany I. Thirty-ninth Illinois Volunteer 
Infantry, and went with his command first 
to St. Louis. Missouri, from there to W'ill- 
iamsport, Maryland, and then to Hancock, 
Virginia, taking part in the battle at that 
place. He was also in the battle of Win- 
chester, and then went up the Shenandoah 



valley to Fredericksburg, Virginia, whence 
the command was ordered hack to ] ', ,rt Re- 
public, and took part in the engagement at 
that place. The regiment was then sent to 
Harrison's Landing to cover McClelland's 
retreat, and subsequently marched to York- 
town. They went into winter quarters at 
Suffolk, and the following spring proceeded 

Port Royal. South Carolina. When his 
regiment veteranized in [863 he was dis- 
charged on account of disability and re- 
turned home, having fought most valiantly 
under the stars and stripes, showing great 
devotion to the cause of his adopted country. 
\fter his return home. Mr. Hirst bought 

.mi ..f eight\" acres in Santa Anna town- 
ship belonging to the Jacob Kirby heirs, and 
to the improvement and cultivation of that 
place he devoted his energies for several 
years, meeting with good success in his 
farming operations and accumulating a nice 
property. He still owns the farm, hut in 
[897 he removed to Farmer City and pur- 
chased a nice residence on William street. 
built by Edwin Embry, and here he is now 
living a retired life, enjoying the fruits of 
former toil. He deserves great credit for 
the success that lie has achieved in life, hav- 
ing received no outside aid or financial as- 
sistance, but being a man of sound judg- 
ment and good business ability, he has stead- 
ily prospered until he is now quite well-to- 
Socially he is a prominent and influen- 
tial member of the Grand Army l'ost at 
Farmer City, in which he has tilled offices, 
and is now junior vice-commander, and he 
gs to the Masonic Lodge. No. 
710. and the Independent Order of < )A<\ 
bellows, both of Farmer City. 

On the 1st of January, 1856, Mr. Hirst 
married Miss Ruby Dart, a daughter of 
Mrs. Ruby Dart. By this union were 
born four children: William, who died 



34Q 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



in infancy; Frances, of Farmer City; 
Mar) I., of Chicago; and James Louis, a 
farmer, who married Emma F. I 'aye and 
has two daughters, Ruby and Lois. The 
wife of our subject died in 1863, at the age 
of thirty-four years, and he was again mar- 
ried, October 15. c866, his second union be- 
ing with Mrs. Mary E. Kirby, a daughter 
of Phineas Page and widow of Jacob Kirby, 

who at his death left two children. William 
II. and Flora E. Mr>. Hirst died March 
i_\ 1898, ai the age of sixty-nine years. By 
Ins second marriage our subjeel hail one 
daughter, Winifred Jane, who married 
Lewis Rutledge aftd has one son, Hirst Rut- 
ledge, who is Mr. Hirst's onlj grandson. 

Hirst Rutledge traces his ancestry back 
to Thomas and Sarah (Officer) Rutledge, 

wlio were of English and Irish descent. The 

former, a native of Georgia, hnt was a n 
denl of Kentucky while serving as ,1 ranger 

in the war of iSu, and at an early day came 
to Illinois. \fter living for some time in 
White county, he removed to McLean coun- 
ty in [828, and there died two years later, 
at the aye of sixty-two. Mis wife survived 
him about thirteen years. They were the 
parents of ten children, including: Cynthia, 
Jane. Robert, Officer, Mark and William 
Jackson. 

William Jackson Rutledge, just men- 
tioned, was horn in White county. Illinois. 
June 23, (8l6. lie had \er\ little oppOT 
trinity to attend school, hut nature did much 
for him. and he was a fine man in every 
sense. Through his own efforts he became 
a well-educated man and successful farmer. 
In early life he assisted in the support of his 
mother and the younger members of the fam- 
ily until nineteen years of aye. He then 
married Eliza Duffield, who died three years 
later, leaving two children: Martha J., de- 
ceased; and John Allen, the grandfather of 



Hirst Rutledge. The father of these chil- 
dren was again married in 1839, his second 
union being with Mary YanDevender, 
daughter of Jacob VanDevender. Mr. Rut- 
ledge died at the age of sixty six years. He 
w as 1 me < >f the pn iminent anil w ell -n i-di 1 cit- 
izens of his community, and Rutledge town- 
ship. DeWitt county .was named in his 
honi ir. 

John Allen Rutledge succeeded to his 
father's estate, which consisted of over six 
hundred acres, and successfully followed 
farming throughout life, lie married Miss 
Calistia J. ^.rbogast, a daughter of Peter 
and Sarah (Wood) Arbogast, and she still 
siir\i\cs her husband, making her home in 
Farmer City. The children horn to them 
wen' as follows; t 1 ) Charles Jasper died 
young, i _• 1 George V wedded Mary J. 
Fuller and they have four children. Lula I.. 
J. Clyde, \manda and David. (3)Martha 
A., the deceased wife of A. Huffman. (4) 
William J. married Lucy Parvin and they 
have four children. George, Omer, Cecil A. 
and I 'earl. (5) John S. married ( 'larinda 
I. Andrew. (6) Lewis M. married Wini- 
fred J. Hirst, and they have one son, I hist. 
1 7 1 ( )llie I I. is the wife of Flora I >Oty and 
they have three children. Owen M.. Arthur 
I;., and Lott. (8) Mary E. is the wife of 
M. B. Kincaid. (9) Mamie I), is the wife 
of C. II. Judd. ( mi One son died in in- 
fancy. 



LAFAYETTF. I ):■; HOICK. 

This well-known resident of Clinton, 
who was one of the first men to make a suc- 
cess as a breeder of line thoroughbred trot- 
ting horses, was born in Johnson county. 
Iowa, February 8, 1853, and comes of good 
old Revolutionary stock, being a great- 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



34 1 



grandson of John De 1 >< 'ico. who fought for 
American independence. He was born in 
Paris. France, May 15. 1750. ami came to 
this country with the French Huguenots 
who were driven from their native land on 
account "f their religious belief. He set- 
tled in Shaftsburg, Vermont, where he died 
in i—<>i. There he had married Amy How- 
let, who was horn at that place January [2, 
1753. and died in [823. The only known 
son of this worthy couple was William Lud- 
low De Boice, the grandfather of our suh- 
ject. He wa- married. September 29, [806, 
to Philanda Merrick, of Windham county. 
Vermont. She was horn in Dummerston, 
that county. April i<). 17S4. and died Feb- 
ruary 7. [873. They had one son, Will- 
iam II. De Boice, who was horn in Onon- 
dagua county. New York. June 28, 1S10. 
and died in Clinton. Illinois, in 1891. On 
the 7th of March. 1858, lie married Miss 
Annie S. Taylor, of Madison county. Ohio. 
who was horn in Bangor, Maine. Septem- 
ber 5, [821. The children horn of this 
union were William Harrison, who died in 
I ronton. Missouri, January 3, [862, from 
injuries received in the war of the Rehel- 
I1011 : Frank Marion, who was injured in the 
siege of Vicksburg and died at Memphis. 
Tennessee, January 18, [863; Amy A., wife 
of E. Sylvester Miller, of Clinton. Illinois; 
Sylvia Cerepita, wife of Charles Taylor, of 
Mexico: Annie Marie, wife of J. Warner, 
of Chicago; and Lafayette, of this review, 
lor his second wife the father married Mrs. 
Alma Ward, a -ister of Peter Hagle. of 
Clinton. She i- now living in Springfield, 
Illinois. By this marriage were horn two 
children: Fred W.. a resident of Kansas 
City; and Clara Jane, deceased wife oi 
Richard I 'aimer. In early life the father 
removed to Madison county. Ohio: later 
went to Iowa, and in [854 came to Clinton, 



Illinois. He purchased the Betzer farm in 
thi- county, which he improved, hut after 
owning the same for ten years he sold and 
bought what is now known as the L. Ab- 
bott farm. This he disposed of in [872, 
when he retired from active labor and re- 
moved to Clinton, buying the Leader prop- 
erty. He was a Republican in politics and 
served as commissioner of his town-hip for 
a time. Socially he affiliated with the In- 
dependent Order of Odd Fellows. 

It was during the infancy of our subject 
that the family came to DeWitt county, and 
until seventeen years of age he followed 
farming here. He then went to Kansas 
and was engaged in freighting first from 
Wichita and later from Wellington. Cald- 
well and Reno, this being before the day of 
railroads in the west. In the fall of 1X71. 
he returned to Clinton and was connected 
with the Sylvester mills for two years, hut 
failing health soon forced him to seek out- 
door employment. He then purchased the 
William • '•. Savage farm of fifty acres, and 
turned his attention to the raising and train- 
ing of trotting horses. I le ha- since owned 
some of the hest breeds in the state, and 
usually sells from ten to fifteen annually. 
He now owns the noted stallion. Al. Kone, 
which is one of the finest in central Illinois, 
and which was purchased by him in [892 
when two years old. He also has Edna 
Kone. and has raised Sadie 1). and Easter 
Lily, besides several two. three and four- 
year-olds, which he -till owns. He 
eight breeding mares and keep- hue trot- 
ters on hand all the time. Each year he 
has a regular -ale. He has won races in 
various part- of the -tate. anil wherever his 
horses have been entered they have gained 
such a wide reputation that large crowds 
gather to see them. They have won a large 
percentage of the race- in which they have 



342 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



been entered, His fine, large stable upon 
his place was destroyed bj fire in i<)oo, 
and he has since used the stable a1 the Clin- 
ton Fair grounds, where he has plenty of 
opportunity to exercise his horses, lie em 
ploys only the must competenl men to assist 
him in caring for his horses, but he breaks 
and drives all of them himself. 

Mr. De Boice married Miss Ida Savage, 
a daughter of William Gibson Savage, de 

;ed, who was one of the esteemed citi 
zens of Clinton, lie was born near Lake 
Champlain, New York, in August, i8n. 
Her grandfather, Gibson Savage, was horn 
in Xew England, of Scotch and English 
parentage, and removed to Ohio prior to 
[820. There her father grew to manh< 
and learned the tanner's and saddler's 
trades, but later followed farming in Cham- 
paign county, Ohio, until 1849, when he 
came to DeWitl county, Illinois. He con- 
tinued to engage in agricultural pursuits for 
some years and also dealt largel) in real 
estate, especially in hnsiness property, lie 
amassed quite a fortune, and died honored 
and respected by all who knew him. In 
August. 1835, he married Miss Sarah Gid- 
eon. -I Champaign county, Ohio, who was 
born in Loudoun county, Virginia, Novem 
her < ■. 1N14. and is a daughter ' Geot 
and Elizabeth 1 Miller 1 Gideon. She 
proved a valuable counsellor and helpmeet 
to her husband, ami since his death has dis- 
played much hnsiness ability in the man- 
agement of the large propert) left her. She 
is now erecting a fine residence for hersell 
in Clinton. Very charitable and hem 
lent, she gives liberally to all enterprises 
calculated to advance the public welfare. 
Mr. and Mrs. De II. .ice have four children: 
Sadie (.'.. who was graduated with honors 
at the Clinton high school in 1901 ; Will- 
iam II.; Edna; and Bennie. 



The Republican party has always found 
in Mr. De Boice a stanch supporter of its 
principles, and he is now efficiently serving 
his third term as commissioner of high- 
ways. In religious beliel he is a Univer- 
s.dist. ami in his social relations is a mem- 
ber of the Uniform Rank of Knights of 
Pythias, the United Protective League and 
the Masonic fraternitv. 



Will I \.\l I!. LANE. 

It requires some effort of the imagina- 
tion and the authentic stories of the old pio 
neers t,, enable the modern tourist to associ- 
ate the smiling fields of grain, the comfort- 
able homes ami varied improvements t.> be 
found in DeWitt county, Illinois, with the 
time when, hnt a few \cars ago, this was a 
remote frontier, with no communication 
with civilization except by days of slow 
travel over trails made l.v wild beasts or In 
dians. This was the condition of the land 
when our subject, who is William I'.. Lane, 
came t. . this prosperous O >nntv . 

The birth of Mr. Lane was in Monroe 
comity. Kentucky, on September [6, \Xjj. 
and he was hnt six weeks old when his par- 
ents, who were Lzekiel and Talilha Lane. 
came t.. Hamilton county, Illinois. Both of 
them were natives of Tennessee, who after 
marriage had moved to Kentucky, and as 
indicated, located in Illinois. For eighl 
years they engaged in farming in Hamilton 
county, hnt in 1835, Mr. Lane walked all 
the distance to Danville, and there entered 
one hundred and sixty acres of governmenl 
land in what is now DeWitt comity, and in 
what was later named (reek township. For 
many years Ezekiel Lane was known to the 
people of this neighborhood as a faithful 



CO 

r 
> 

2 

m 

> 
z 

D 







THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 






minister in the New Light church, and lxith 
he and his wife were known as kind, good 
neighbors, among the early settlers. Mr. 

lane died at the aye of fifty-two years, his 
wife passing away at tl g i forty-two. 

ir of their eight children still survive. 
these being: Tillmon, a resident of Lane: 
William IV. our subject; Marinda, the 
widow of John St>>ne. an early settler of this 
county, and now resides with a daughter in 

\V 1 River, Nebraska: and Mary Ann. 

who married Jerry Lane, now living in Lane. 
Mir. 

The early education of our subject, Will- 
iam P.. Lane, was necessarily very limited. 
The school-house was made of logs and the 

canvas which supplied the lack 
window - - admitted more cold and 

in than light, but the time spent there 
', for the eager little student 
who trudged through the snow during the 
bitter winter weather, only regretting that 
lie * -pared from the farm work only 

a few day- in the week. However, the knowl- 
_ ■.• now I by Mr. Lane is of a 

practical kind, r a - ciation with 

men of affair- has developed and broadened 
his st' >re • if infi irmati< »ri, and he is one of the 
intelligent citizens of Lane. 

Early in life our subject learned the 
hardships of pioneer farming, and for many 
S ultural pursuits ex- 
clusively. In the meantime the town of 
ne, named in his honor, had been estab- 
lished on a portion of hi- land, and in it 
he removed thither and opened up a grocery 
hich he nducted 

for a i>eriod of twelve years, since which he 
has lived in comparative retirement, in his 
pleasant home in Lane. His means are am- 
ple, and he . >w ns a farm < if . me hundred acres 
in Creek township. 

Mr. Lane was first married in 1 S 5 1 to 



Jane Murphy, who was a daughter of Lieu- 
tenant Richard Murphy, who was killed in 
the Mexican war. and seven children were 
born to this union, viz.: Talitha, who mar- 
ried George Peck, and resides in Color. 

ilorado, and has two children; 
E rah, who is the widow of 01< > 'leson, of 
Decatur, has five children, two girl- and 
thr© Ezekiel, who conduct- a restaur- 

ant in Clinton. Illinois, married Julia Kile- 
linger, and has three children: John, who 
reside- at Storm Lake. Iowa, married Annie 
Arnold, and has four children: Louisa, de- 
ceased, married Fred Wemple, of Texar- 
kana. Arkansas, and left one child: Lewi-, 
who lives at Champaign. Minois, 
in the railroad business, married Susan Mac- 
Mahon and has four children: his second 
marriage being t< 1 G >ra Frank, fn >ui which 
lias resulted one child: and Maggie, who 
lives in Colorado Springs, the wife of Henry 
Gouker, and they have two children. 

In 1877 the mother of these children 
died, and the second marriage of Mr. Lane 
was on October 17. r88o, to Mrs. Hannah 
Kranich, who was the widow of Alfred 
Kranich. She - kiel 

Lisenby, who was a native of Tennessee, and 
came to DeWitt county in the early day- 
it- settlement. He moved to Kansas and 
there his wife died soon after, at the age of 
seventy-two, but he survived until he 

ity-four d. Mrs. Lane is one 

a family of fifteen children, seven of whom 
are yet living, although no others have lo- 
cated in this county. By her first marri 
was born one daughter — Ida. now the wife 
■ if < ie< irge St< me, of 1 1 ., n . Mini 

and she has eight children. By her second 
marriage Mrs. Lane is the mother 
-on — Orville, who was born on August n>, 
and who lives at home. 

Mr-. Lane early learned thi - in- 



346 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



cident to pioneer life, and experienced its 
privations to the fullest extent. When she 
was but seven years old she had spun enough 
wool to make herself a dress, and she con- 
tinued to spin wool for that purpose until 
she was eighteen years of age. Vs her fa- 
ther was a cripple, and there were no boys 
in the family with the exception of the 
youngest child, she and her sisters worked 
in the fields, chopped wood in the timber, 
and in other ways performed the tasks and 
duties of a man. She split die rails for 
mam rods of fence, and then laid them, but 
in looking hack over those days long since 
gone, she finds that with all the hard work 
her life was a happy one. Surely the young 
men and women of this day owe a debt of 
gratitude to such noble women, who en- 
dured SO much to make possible what all 
lmw enjoy. 

Mi Mr. and Mrs. I.aue are consistent 
members of the Christian church, in winch, 
fur a long peril id. Mr. Lane was an officer 
and superintendent of the Sunday-school. 
For forty-five years he has been a member 
<if this religious body and has ever exerted 
an influence in favor of morality and Chris- 
tianity. In politics he has been a life-long 
I lemocrat, hut never a seeker fur office, lie 
has witnessed wonderful changes in this lo- 
cality, and has been identified with much of 
the progress and development. 



WILLIAM M. ST< »RY. 

William M. Story, who is now living a 
retired life with his daughter, Mis. V 
near Waynesville, is a worthy representa- 
tive of the honored pioneers of DeWitt 
county, and a true type of the energetic, 
hardy men who have actively .assisted m de- 



veloping and improving this beautiful and 
fertile agricultural country. When he 
came here in the summer of 1834 the dusky 
savages were often seen in this locality and 
wild game of all kinds abounded, hut these 
have long since fled and their haunts have 
been replaced by waving fields of grain and 
thri\ ing cities and villages. 

Mr. Story was hunt in Morgan county, 
Ohio, August 23, 1829, a sun nf Palmer and 
Mary Ann (Morris) Story. Jiis paternal 
grandfather was John Story, who was a 
soldier of the war of [812. He was born 
in 1 Hie 1 if the eastern states and from there 
removed to Pennsylvania and later to Ohio, 
locating in Morgan county. Our subject's 
father was a native nf Pennsylvania, hut his 
early life was principally passed in Morgan 
county, Ohio, where he is said to have as. 
sisied in boring the first salt well, which 
was nine hundred feet deep. lie was em- 
ployed in tin- salt works there fur several 
years, and then came to Illinois in [834. 
After spending the winter in Logan county, 
in the spring of [838 he boughl a farm in 
Waynesville township, DeWitt county, forty 
acres . if which had heen broken and a log 
shanty erected thereon, and he at 1 nice 
turned his attention t < > its further improve- 
ment and cultivation. In [850 he and our 
subject made an overland trip to California 
with a cattle train and twenty-three wagons, 
and were six months and seven days upon 
the mad. arriving at the gold diggings at 
Hangtown on the 7th of September. They 
spent eleven months in searching fm" the 
precious metal with fair success, and then 
returned by way of the Panama route. Ar- 
riving in New Y"i'k City, they went up the 
Hudson river to Albany, thence by train to 
Chicago, and by canal and the Illinois river 
tn their h. ime. their arrival being a ^reat 
surprise tn their family and friends. Sub- 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 






sequently the father removed t. ■ Bloomii g 
ton, where he was in the grocery 

• ness for some years, and he died in that 
city in 1883. Hi> wife survived him al>"iit 
five ye; 

On coming to Illinois William M. Story 
was seven years ije, and amid so 

common t<> frontier life he grew to man- 

d. When only fifteen he took chai 

the home farm and carried it on quite 
ally until he and his father went to 

ifornia. After his return he bought the 
place, and at different times purchased other 
tracts of land until he had two hundred and 
forty acres in McLean and DeWitt coun- 
ties, which he operated with good success 

a number of years. In 18'K) he moved 

to Caldwell county. Missouri, in company 

with Daniel Proctor, and together they 

a section of government land under 

the graduation act. He improved this tract 

:hree hundred and twenty acres, and en- 

g ged in its cultivation for three years. He 

then returned to the old homestead in this 

o >unty, and followed farming here for some 

5, but is now living a retired life. 

In December. 1851, Mr. Story was mar- 
ried in DeWitt county to Miss Eliza C. 
Phares. a native of Butler county. Ohio, and 
a daughter of Joseph and Ellen Phares. who 
came to this county about 1850. Her 
mother is still living, at the advanced 

eighty-six years. For nearly half a cen- 
tury Mr. and Mrs. Story traveled lif 
journey together, sharing it< joys and - 
rows, its trials and hardships, but he has 
been called upon to mourn the loss of his 
estimable wife, who died January 20. i v 
The children born to them were as fol- 
lows: Palmer J. is married and resides in 
Iowa: Mary E. is the wife of Baxter Bobee, 
of Iowa; Cynthia J. is the wife of P>. B. 
Shafer, of Adair county, Missouri; John is 



married and engaged in farming in DeWitt 
county. Illinois; Sarah L. married E. L. 
Yocom, a substantial farmer of this county. 

who died January ing two 

children. Harry and Dell: Dell, a daughter 
of our subject, is the wife of James Baker, 
of Scotland county. Missouri; Lucy died at 
the age of nineteen years. 

In politics Mr. Story is a stanch Repub- 
lican, and in his social relations is a mem- 
ber of the Ma>ouic lodge at Waynesville. 
He ha< many interesting reminiscences of 
early days, and is one of the honored pio- 
neers of this county. In early life he was 

eat hunter, bringing down many a deer 
in this section, while in the west he has 
killed elk and buffalo. Although now well 
advanced in years, he is still a g sh< >t 

with a rifle, his eye being keen and his ner 
steady. Of recent years he has tra\ 
considerably over the west, through Mis- 
souri. Colorado. Kansas and Nebraska, and 
in 1897 made a trip to Alaska, where he had 
many thrilling exepriences and came near 
losing his life in a snow slide. 



HUGHES BOWLES. 

1 iu-!ies Bowles, a well-known citizen of 
Hallsville, is the posse — r of a go d prop- 
erty which now enables him to spend his 
years in the pleasurable enjoyment of his 
accumulations. The record of his life, pre- 
vious to 1900, is that of an active, enter- 
prising, methodical and sagacious busil 
man. who bent his em the honor- 

able acquirement ui a comfortable compe- 
tence for himself and family. 

Mr. Bowles is one of DeWitt county's 
native sons, his birth having occurred in 
Tunbridge township, December 5, 1842. 
His father. Henry Bowles, was 1>, ,rn in 



348 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



Bourbon county, Kentucky, July in. 1S1S. 
and was a son of Hughes Bowles, a farmer 
of thai county, who, in the twenties, before 
the winter of the deep snow, brought his 
family to DeWitt county, Illinois, being one 
of the first to locate here, lie took up a 
large amount of government land and be- 
came owner <<\ several hundred acres. 1'lie 

father .if our Sllbjecl was reared in this 

countj and married Miss I assie Hall, who 
was also hern in Kentuck) and was quite 
young when she came to this state. Her 
mother, Mar) Mall, was another of the 
pioneers of DeWitt county. Henry Bowles 
followed farming, and plowed much of his 
land with a team consisting of one horse 
and an ox. lie died September 20, 1845, 
at the age of 1 ighl years, and his 

wile died March 25, 1 N_s 1 . at the age of 

twent) five. She was born April 7. 1826. 
\fter the death of his mother our sub- 
ject made his home with his maternal grand- 
mother, Mi>. Mary Hall, and. other relatives 
imiil he was grown, and received a good 
common school education, lie then worked 
b) the month as a farm hand for a few 
years, bul after his marriage bought a farm 
of "in- hundred and twenty acres near 
Farmer City, but in McLean county, and at 
comt enced i<> break the virgin soil 
and improve the place b) the erection oi 
fences and good and substantial buildings. 
\ fiii residing th twenty-one years he 

sold the place and bought residence prop- 
erty in Hallsville and a farm in Tunbridge 
township, DeWitt comity. He rented his 
farm, and while making his home in the 
village he operated a farm nearer that place 
fi ir six years. I !■■ then 1 erro n ed ti 1 I falls 
ville and successfully ei in farming 

for five years. He then retired from act 
labor and returned to Hallsville, in Febru- 
ary, 1900. He is still the owner of a good 



farm of one hundred and fifty-seven acres 
of land near Kinney, hut is now living a re- 
tired life. 

In Harnett ti i\\ nship, this county, Mr. 
Bowles was married, February 5, [868, to 
Miss Rachel Bartley, who was born in Mad- 
ison connt\. Ohio, but during infancy was 
brought to DeWitt county, Illinois, where 
she was reared. Her father, John Hartley, 
was a native of Pennsylvania, and in early 
life went to Ohio, where he married Miss 
Xancx McCHmans, a native of that state. 
Six children blessed the union of Mr. and 
Mis Bowles, nameh : Myrtie C, now the 
wife of l.d P. Hildreth, a merchant of Kin- 
ney; Lora I... wife of Skillman Hunter, 
ticket agent and telegraph operator at Halls 
ville; Mont I'... who is married and engaged 
in farming on his father's place: l.avcnie 
and Edna, both at home; and an infant, 
deceased. 

Originally Mr. Bowles was a Democrat 
in politics, and casl his first presidential 
vote foi General George B. McClellan in 
1N114, lint of later years he has been ideilti- 
with the I 'n ihibitii m party. I le has 
served on the school hoard, but has nevei 
cared for public office. Religiousl) he and 
his wife are members of the Christian 
church at Hallsville, ami as a public-spirited 
and progressive man he gives a liberal sup- 
port to all measures calculated to advance 
the moral, educational and material welfare 
of the community in which he resides. So- 
cially he is a member of the Modern Wood- 
men of America. 



W. M. PERSINGER. 

The fertile prairies of Illinois have 
opened up possibilities before the expectant 

eyes of man) of her adopted son- 




W. M. PERSINGER 




MRS. W. M. PERSINGER. 



THE l'dnCRAI'IUCXL RECORD. 



353 



none have better improved their chanc- 
es than W. M. Persing of the 
farmers and stock-raisers of DeWitt county. 
A nati l ie Buckeye state, he was born 

- Iney, Shelby county, December 2, - 
ami :- of William R. and Priscilla 

(Beatty) Persinger, nati. 

iia and Maryland. Both ren 
from the place- of their nativity to Ohio 
about 1813, and were there united in mar- 
They were among the early settlers 
Shelby county, and there made their 
homes during the remainder of their lives. 
the father dying at the age of eighty-four, 
and the mother when sixty-nine years 
They were both mem the Methodist 

Episcopal church and died in the faith. By 
occupation the father was a farmer, which 

: in he followed throughout life. In 
politics he was a Whig. In the family were 
eight children, four sons and four daughters, 
of whom ' sd two daughters 

now living. The paternal grandfather of 
our subject. Jacob Persinger, removed with 
irly in 181 3. and leav- 
them there, enlisted in t! I war 

with Great Britain, and served about six 
months. 

\\ illiam M. Persinger was third in order 
of birth in his father's family. In his native 

he grew to manhood, and was educated 
in its public si At the age of twenty- 

one he started out to earn an independent 
livelihood by working on a farm by the 
month. When twenty-three yea 
he rented land ami carried on general farm- 
veral years, anil in me to 

DeWitt county. Illinois, where he also rent- 
ed land which he continued to farm until 

While still residing in Ohio, and during 
the dark days of the Civil war. on t 
of May. [864, Mr. Persinger enlisted in 

16 



Company K. One Hundred and Thirty- 
fourth Ohio Volunteer Infantry. The r< f 
ment w; the Tenth Arm; 

under command of General Butler, in front 
of Richmond, and was ii I minor en- 

cments during its term but 

was principally occupied in picket duty. At 

the close of his term of service. Mr. Per- 

honorably disc! Septem- 

at Columbus. Ohii ■. 

On the 6th of Aug 54, was 

emnized the marriage of Mr. Persinger and 
Miss Eliza Chrisman, a daughter of David 
and Leana Chrisman. the former a native 

Pennsylvania, and the latter of Virginia. 
They were the parents of ten children, live 
of whom are yet living. To Mr. and Mrs. 
Persinger have been horn five children: 
Harvey 11.. Newton R., Charles 
Florence, and Xettie Priscilla. Of these.. 
Newton R. married Miss Amy Howard, a 
native of Kenney, Illinois, and they have 
two children. Rosanna and Newton R., Jr. 
Lenora Florence married L. 1 >. Scott, now- 
living in California, and they have six chil- 
dren. Harry. Mamie. Lewis, Roy. Xettie 
and Ralph. Charles G. married Adelia Tay- 
lor, and they reside in Macon county, with 
their two children. Linn and Fl< irence. 

In 367 ne year prior to his removal 
to DeWitt county. Mr. Persinger bought 
forty a and. which entually 

I, and eighty acres purchased in its pi 
and this in turn was disposed <>i and 
hundred and forty acres purchased. To this 
he later added until he now owns two bun 
dred and twenty acres of land in DeWitt 
county. upon which he ral 

farming and stock-: lie also ow 

eighty acre- of well improved land in Macon 
county. Illinois, and eighty acres of tin:' 
land in California. The latter ed with 

a heavy growth of pine, and on account 



354 



THE MOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



the remarkable growth of the box industry 
in that locality, it is rapidly increasing in 
value. Ml of the improvements on the home 
farm were made by him, and his farm is 
one i if tin.- best in his township. 

In politics Mr. Persinger ^ a Republi- 
can, and for two terms he served as justice 
of the peace, and for twelve years he was a 
member of the school board. Fraternally 
lie is a member of Kenny Lodge, [. O. O. ] . 
and has passed all the chairs. As a citizen 
he is enterprising and progressive, and never 
shirks his duty in any respect. I lis friends 
are numerous in both DeWitt and Macon 

o 'unties. 



GE< >RGE WEEDMAN. 

irge Weedman, deceased, was oni 
honored pi' mi 1 representative citi- 

zens of DeWitl county, his last days being 
spenl in Farmer City, where his widow now 
resides. He belonged to a family of Hol- 
land origin, which was founded in Penn- 
sylvania prior to the Revolutionary war by 
his grandfather, George Weedman. \ 
made his home there for s'.me years ai 
his marriage. His first wife was also of 
lh 'Hand descent. At an early day they re- 
moved to Perry county, Ohio, and in 1830 
came to Heyworth, McLean county, Illinois, 
where they experienced many hardships and 
trials incident to frontier life. There the 
first wife died a few years after their ar- 
rival, and he later married Phehc llalsey. 
Who survived him. living t" he over Eour- 
1 ■! age. 
fohn Weedman. the second child 
George, was hern in Pennsylvania, in 17')". 
and was quite young when he accompanied 
his parents on their removal to Ohio. On 



reaching man's estate he married Miss 
Racial Wilson, a daughter of Asa Wilson, 
who removed with his family from Mary- 
land i" the Buckeye state when Mrs. Weed- 
man was young. Her parents both died in 
( >hio at a ripe "Id age. In [830 Mr. Weed- 
man came t" Illinois, and settled in Ran- 
dolph's Grove, .McLean county, bul in 1835 
removed to Santa Anna township, De- 
Witt county, where his wife died in 1854, 
at the age of fiftj eight years. I le then sold 
his place in this county and spent his last 
days in Webster City, Iowa, where he died 
in 1866, at the age of seventy-four. For 
his second wife lu- married .Mrs. Minerva 
1 Ya/cll 1 • lamble, a native of Ohio, who re- 
turned to Farmer City, Illinois, after Mr. 
Weedman's death, and Lin married Major 
I licks. Mr. Weedman was a very line 
man. uprighl and honorable in all busini 
transactions, ami was a faithful member of 
the Methodist Episcopal church. At his 
death he left a large estate. B) his first 
wife he had ten children, namely: Asa, 
Harriet. George, Vmos, John, Isaiah, Lu 
cinda, Eliza Emma, Zadok Casey and 
Thomas St. < lair. 

orge Weedman. whose name intro- 
duces this sketch, was born m I '• mty, 
( )hi". March 28, iS_'4. and was eleven years 
of age when he came with his parents to 
DeWitt county, Illinois, and was here reared 
t" manhood amid pioneer scenes, lie re- 
ceived a good education for those times. 
On the 17th nf April. [845, he married Miss 
Catherine Danner. a daughter of John and 
Catherine (Zener) I tanner, who came to 
Illinois in 1834, ami were among the pio- 
rs of this section of the state. Her fa- 
ther was a native of Maryland and a son of 
David and Catherine (Bonner) Danner, 
who were probably of German birth. Their 
other children were William, David, Lena, 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



355 



S lly ami Maria. Mrs. Weedman's father 
lived for some time in Kentucky, later in 
Harrison county, Indiana, and then in 
Montgomery county, this state, when he 
came to Illinois. He was a shoemaker, 1 
ing learned that trade in Louisville, Ken- 
tucky, and on coming to this state he I 
lowed that occupation in Farmer City until 
his death. In politics he was first a Whig 
and later a Republican, and in •.. be- 

lief was a Methodist, being an active mem- 
ber and class-leader in that church. In 
Kentucky he was united in marriage with 
Miss Catherine Zener, who was a native "i 
Pennsylvania and of German descent. In 
early life she was a member of the United 
Brethren church, but later joined the Meth- 
ist Episcopal church. To this worthy 
couple were born the following children: 
Absalom, who married Lucretia Covey; 
Jacob, who tirst married Paulina Long and 

rod Hannah Oviatt; Polly, who mar- 
ried Nathan Clearwatens; Allen, who mar- 
ried Mary J. Crawford: John, who married 
Sarah Sercey; Rachel, wto married 

Gilbert Johnson and Ross Payne; 

nuel, who died unmarried at the age ^i 
thirty-five years; David, who is single; 
William, who married Hester Johnson; 
Isaac, who married Caroline Draper: and 
Catherine, who married George Weedman, 

his review. Mr. Danner w lier 

in the war of [812. 

Mr. ami Mr-. Weedman became the par- 
ents of ten children, namely: 11) Jacob 
1'.. whi i died in icjoi, at the age of fifty-five 
years, married Almeda Slick and had one 
child. Thornton. At the time of the break- 
ing out of the Civil war he enlisted in Com- 
pany I, Thirty-ninth Illinois Volunteer In- 
fantry, ami was on the skirmish line when 
Lee surrendered. ( _> ) Squire William, a 
resident of Denver, Colorado, married Anna 



Chapman, of Kansas, and they have six 
children. Effie, George, Karl. Almeda. Ruby 
and Annie. 131 Rachel i- the widow of 
Henry Farmer and lives in banner City. 
Her children were Mrs. Adelia McClure, 
deceased; Mrs. Pearl Wilson; and Henry. 
14) Harriet is the wife of J. W. Baker, of 
Holyrood, Kansas, and they have three 
children, Bert, Katie and Georgia. (5) 
Sally is the wife of William Swiney, of 
Kingman, Kansas. (6) Jennie married 
M. B. Xeal. of Farmer City. Illinois, and 
to them were born two children: Rolla B. 
and Gladys <i.. both living. <7> Lucy 
Ann. who died at the age of two and a 
half years. (8) Ella married tirst J. 1". 
Rollings, ''i Bellflower, and they had one 
child. Grace. After the death of Mr. Rol- 
lings she married Balm Leady, of St. Louis, 
am! the_\' have one child. Roscoe. (9) Za- 
doc married Jennie Romine, of Farmer 
City. Illinois, and they have four children, 
Kern. Fay. I I Abra- 

ham I... a resident of Holyrood, Kansas, 
married Ida Gilmore and they have three 
children. Opal, l'earl and Ruby. 

On tiie 19th of March. [850, Mr. Weed- 
man, in company with four brother-, 
started across the plains for California with 
teams and wagons, and arrived in Hang- 
town on the 4th of July. After spending 

le time in the gold fields he went to San 
Francisco, where he took pas a sail- 

ing-vessel, and by water proceeded down the 

-t to the Isthmus of Panama. The ves- 
sel encountered some severe -tonus and was 
delayed forty-six days. After crossing the 
isthumus he went down through the Gulf 
"i Mexico and up the Mississippi and Illi- 
nois rivers to Pekin, this state, arriving 
home just thirteen month- to a day from 
the time he left it. He then turned his at- 
tention to farming and stock-raising, and 



356 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



so successful was he iii his business affairs 
that he accumulated several hundred acres 
of land, becoming one of the wealthiesl and 
most substantial men in his community. In 
[888 he retired from active labor and re- 
moved t" Farmer City, where he built a fine 
residence, making it his home until called 
to his tinai resl m (893, at the age of si 
nine years. In politics he was an ardent 
Republican, and he filled the office of school 
trustee. Socially he was a member of the 
Independent Order of Odd Fellows and the 
Masonic fraternity, and religiousl) was a 
member of the Methodist Episcopal church. 
of which lie was a steward. lie was a man 
of the highest respectability, and those who 
were ni"st intimately . d with him 

speak in unqualified terms of his sterling 
integrity, his honor in business and his 
lideluv to ever} trust reposed in him. His 
wife is also an acini' member of the Metho- 
disi 1 h. and is loved and re- 

spected by all who know her. 



PETER K. \\ ILLSON. 

Peter K. Willson, a practical and enter- 
prising agriculturist of Harp township, 
owns and operat of the valuable and 

highh proved farms of that locality, and is 
als<> successfully engaged in stock 
and the grain business at Birkbeck. He 
was horn in Scott county. Illinois, in [857 
July _><». and is a son of Samuel and 1 
cinda (Kimble) Willson. who are now liv- 
ing in Clinton. The father was horn in 
Lycoming county, Pennsylvania, on the 
nth of October, 1825, and was a son of 
Ezra Willson and grandson of John Will- 
son, both natives of \ew Jersey, and of 
Welsh extraction. Ezra Willson married 



Nancy Flatt, a native of eastern Pennsyl- 
vania and a daughter of Andrew Flatt, who 
was a soldier of the Revolutionary war, en- 
tering the service when a hoy of sixteen. 
I he lather of our subject is the youngest in 
.1 family of ten children. lie was educated 
in the schools of his native county, and ai 
the age of nineteen learned the blacksmith's 
trade, which he followed for some time. 
In 1^41) he went overland to California with 
an ox-team ind spent four years on the I 'a 
eitic slope. ( )n his return east he located 
in Scott county, Illinois, where he engaged 
in blacksmithing for two years, and then 
removed to Sangamon county, where hi' 
made his home until [873. During that 

year he came to Harp township, DeWitt 

mty, where he engaged in farming and 
stock-raising until his retirement from ai 
tne labor in [890, and has since been a resi 
dent of Clinton. In politics he is a Repub- 
lican, and in his church relations is a Meih 
odist. On the [si of March. [855, he was 
united in marriage with Miss Lucinda Kim- 
ble, also a native of Lycoming comity, 
Pennsylvania, and a daughter of Jacob and 
Man 1 mi Kimble, whi 1 were horn 

in the same -late. Her grandfather, Pete: 
Kimble, was a soldier of the war of iNu. 
Mr. and Mis. Willson have three children: 

er K., our subject; llcnrv ('.; and Jen 
nie. 

It was during the infancy of our subject 
that the family removed to Sangamon 
county, and there he was reared and edu 
cated, attending first the public schools ami 
later a business college at Springfield. At 

early age he became thoroughly familiar 
with all the duties which fall to the lot of 
the agriculturist. After coming to DeWitt 
county he gave his father the benefit of his 
labors until lie attained his majority, and re- 
mained home until twenty-five years of age 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



357 



On the 6th of September, 188.2, Mr. 
Willson was united in marriage with Miss 
Caroline P. Walker, a native of DeVVitt 
county, and a daughter of Judge Robert 
Walker, of Harp township, who was one 
the id prominent citizens of 

the county. He was originally from Penn- 

.ania. but came to Illinois from Ohio, 
and after living in Sangamon county for a 
time took up his residence in DeWitt county, 
where he died in 1897. He served as coun- 
ty judge and : supervisor of Harp 
township for a number of terms, and was 
very prominent in Republican circles, 
though lie later became a Prohibitionist. 
He was a member of the Presbyterian 
church of Clinton, and commanded the re- 
spect and confidence of all with whom he 
came in contact either in a husiin rial 
way. His widow now lives with a daugh- 
ter in Harp township. They were the par- 
ents of nine children. Nine children have 
also been horn to our subject and his wife, 
hut one daughter died in infancy. Th 
living are Charles. Harry. May. Alice. 
Clara. Mary. Ruth and Nellie. 

After his marriage Mr. Willson com- 
menced farming on sections 29 and 30, 
Harp township, where he lived for a num- 
ber of year-, and then removed to his fa- 
ther's place, where he built a residence at 
a cosl of four thousand dollars. He now 
owns four hundred and eighty acre- of rich 
and arable land, and his wife has one hun- 
dred and eighty acres, both tracts being in 
Harp township. Mr. Willson gives the 

iter part of attention to the raising and 
feeding of stock, and he usually keeps on 
hand one hundred and fifty head of cattle 
and fmni one hundred and fifty to four hun- 
dred hogs. He has a tine herd of pure-bred 
short horn-. In iS<)<) Mr. Willson built an 
elevator at Birkbeck, and has. since engaged 



in the grain business in connection with his 
■ •tlier business. He i- one of the most en- 
ergetic and progressive men of his com- 
munity, and generally carries forward to 
successful completion whatever he under- 
takes. 

Mr. Willson is a member of the Metho- 
dist Protestant church at Prairie Center, 
and. 1- a stanch supporter •>!" the Republican 
party and its principles. He has served as 
school director twenty-one years, and has 
also tilled the office >>\ town clerk, hut would 
never accept other public positions, prefer- 
ring to give his undivided attention to his 
extensive business interests. He i- a gen- 
erous, liberal-minded and progressive citi- 
zen, and is held in high regard by a large 
circle of friends and acquaintances. 



IK \.\K ADKISS< >N. 

Frank Adkisson, special agent of the 
Phenix Insurance Company at Clinton, is 
one of DeWitt county'- native -on-, his 
birth having occurred in Clintonia township, 
July 10. 1N00. Hi- father, John Adkisson, 
was horn in Tennessee, in [819, and about 
[830 came u > Illinois. He firsl located in 
Winchester. Scotl county, hut in 1S57 came 
t" Clinton, DeWitt county, and purchased 
the property now owned by Dr. Warner. 
On selling that place to Aaron Negley, he 
bought a larger farm, now owned bj J. I. 
Sprague, and there lie made hi- home until 
his death, which occurred in [871. He 
married Corrilla Thomas, who was horn in 
Kentucky in [820, and died in 1SS7. Their 
children were Thomas Kenton, a resident of 
California: Mary, deceased; twins, who 
died in infancy: Ellen and George, both de- 
ceased; Horace, of Clinton; Frank, our sub- 



358 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



ject ; William, deceased; and a daughter, 
-who died in infancy. 

The early life of Frank Adkisson was 
passed upon a farm, and he was educated in 
Clinton. In i88i he became agent For the 
Phenix [nsurance Company, and so success- 
ful was lie in this business that he was made 
special agent in 1890, his territory being 
central and northern Illinois, though he 
practically does business all over the state, 
ranking second in 1901 among the repre- 
sentatives of that company in Illinois. 

Air. Adkisson married Miss Anna Sew- 
ard, of Hillsboro, Illinois. Her father. 
Clarence S. Seward, was horn in Hillsboro, 
Montgomery county, December 25, 1831, 
and is a - n of Israel A. Seward and grand- 
son of John Seward. The latter was a na- 
tive of Albany, New York, and a surveyor 
h\ profession. lie Spent his last days in 
Illinois, and died in Hillsboro, at the age 
eight) Four years. I lis children were But 

ler. Israel. Harrison, Jane. Maria and 
Nancy. Israel Seward was also born in Al- 
bany, New York, and from there went t" 
Morristown, New Jersey. In r8 18 he came 
to Vandalia, Illinois, and for some tune was 
a surveyor in the emplo) of the government. 
Subsequently he located in Hillsboro, where 
he died in [868, at the age of seventy-four 
years. His wife, who bore the maiden 
name of Margaret Slayhack. was born in 
Kentucky in [799, and died in [877. He 
owned and operated different farms in this 
state, and participated in the Black Hawk 
war. In his famil) were the following 
children: William. George, Charles, Henry, 
Caroline, Clarence S., James Frances, Ed- 
ward, Cornelia and Martha. Clarence S. 
Seward, the father >>f Mrs. Adkisson, was 
reared on a farm, and in (849 went over- 
land to California, where he spent ten years 
in mining and other work. On his return 



to Illinois, in [860, he followed farming 
near Hillsboro until [895, when he removed 
t( 1 Clinton. 

In politics he is a Republican, and in 
religious belief is a Presbyterian. He mar- 
ried Sarah Vrooman, a daughter of Minard 
Vrooman, of Fundy, New York, and to 
them were horn four children: Freddit, 
who died young; Anna, deceased wile of 
our subject; Agnes, wife of |. Miller; and 
Sylvia, deceased. Mrs. Adkisson died in 
1 000. at the age of thirty-two years, leav- 
ing 1 'lie child. I. call A. 

Mr. Adkisson has never taken any part 
in political affairs, preferring to give his 
undivided attention to his business interests. 

i.ill\- he is a member of the Independent 
Order of Odd Fellows, the Knights of 
Pythias and the Modern Woodmen of 
America, and also belongs to the blue lodge, 
chapter and commander) of the Masonic 
fraternity, having been made a Knight 
I emplai al I itchfield, Illinois, in [883, 
being at that time the youngest member ol 
the commandery there. I lis close applica- 
tion to business compels him at times to 
take needed rest, and on these occasions he 
indulges his love for the rod and reel, spend- 
ing his vacations near the beautiful wat 
of northern Wisconsin. As a fisherman he 
has met wonderful success, and he has a 
fine specimen of muscalonge. weighing 
twenty pounds, which he caught and has 
mounted as a trophy. lie has a nice home 
in Clinton, surrounded by spacious grounds, 
having purchased the Philip Wolfe prop- 
erty. 



AARON NAGELY. 

Aaron Xagely. one of Clinton's oldest 
and most honored citizens, was horn in 
Clark county. Ohio, on the 26th of March, 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



359 



1817, and i- a son "t' John and Elizabeth 

gely, and grandson of 
and Sarah 1 I 'hares ) Nagely. The grand- 
father, who was a fanner by occupation, 
is I*.™ in Randolph county, Virginia, and 
atx in 1810 removed to Ohio, where he he- 
came a large land owner, giving four of his 
e hundred acres. The other chil- 
dren he helped by giving them money. Both 
he and his wife died when about seventy 
\e. Their children were Chris- 

tina, John. Henry. I Eli, Jacob, Da- 

vid.. Sampson, Pa'ilser, Margaret and Xcl>- 
s maternal grandpar- 
ents were William and Margaret I Dunkle) 
so lived to old age. They 
were natives of Pendleton county. V 
Virginia, the former of Irish descent r • 1 I 
the latu ■ man origin. In their fam- 

ily were the following children: William. 
Elizabeth, Annie. George, Margaret, Mary. 
Reuben and Zebedee. The father of 1 >ur 
subject served in the state militia during the 
war of 1812, and made farming and stock- 
ing his life occupation, owning and 
crating three hundred acres of land in Mad- 

hio. In the spring of 1 v 
he started for California, and died there the 
e year, at the i >ixty-four. Hi- 

wife died at the ag sixty-nine ye 

They had >i\ children, namely: Mary. Icha- 
bod, Christiana. Aaron, William and Rotn 
ert. 

Aan.n Nagley spent hi- early life in hi-; 
native state, and in 1849 came to [Hill 
locating in Clinton. His first home here 
was the old court-house which is now the 
property of Mr-. Lowery. For some time 
he was quite extensively engaged in stock- 
dealing, and as there were no railroads here 
at that time, he drove his stock to market, 
selling his hogs mainly in Pekin and hi< cat- 
tle in Lancaster, Pennsylvania At that 



time it to. ik about three months to make the 
round trip. At one time he had one thou- 
sand hogs in one drove. From 1852 until 
1857 he was engaged in merchandising with 
A. R. Phares, hauling the lumber for his 

e from Indiana and erecting a building 
where the National Bank now stands. 
Later Mr. Nagely turned his attention to 
brick manufacturing for a short time, and 
during President Lincoln's administration 
served as postmaster of Clinton, the office 
then being located on the presenl site of Mr. 
Xichlis' -tore. On his retirement from 
office he resumed stock-dealing, to which he 
devoted his time and energies until he laid 
.ires in [895, and has <ince 
lived a retired life. 

Mr. Nagely married Miss Eliza Adams, 
1 f Clark count}-. Ohio, a daughter of tiie 
Rev. Eli and Elizabeth Adams. She was 
horn in 1820 and died in [897. By this 
union were horn the following children: 
( 1 i Elizabeth married \V. M. Phares and 
they have rive children. Oscar. Edgar, Em- 
ma. Eliza and William. 1 _• t Cyrus died 
in infancy. 1 ,} > Mary Elizabeth is the wife 
of A. Johnson, and their children are 

rles. Clarkus. Cadius, Clay. Clarence. 

Clara. Clinton. Permelia and Eason. They 

lost one. Emma. (41 William < I. i- a 

lent of Denver. Colorado. 1 ; 1 Aman- 
da Malissa i- deceased Permelia is 
the wife of Thomas Bossier, of 1.,.- Ai . 

California, and they have two children, 
Eliza and Kay. 171 Jennie i- the wife of 
Thomas Hull, of Clinton. (8) DeWitt 
Clinton is also a resident of Clinton. (9) 
Charlie married Miss Ella Robins, of De- 
Witt, Illinois, and they have two children, 
I [elen and Louise. 

The Republican party finds in Mr. Nag- 
ely a stanch supporter of its principles, and 
he served as enrolling officer during the war 



360 



THE niOCR \PMICAL RECORD. 



of the Rebellion. For fourteen years he 
filled the office of township and cit) as 
sessor. In [844 he was made a Mason, and 
in [850 helped organize the first lodge in 
Clinton, No. 84, A.. F. & A. M.. in which he 
served as the first junior warden. He and 
his wife were also among the first memtx 
of the Eastern Star chapter. Since [854 
lie has been connected with the Independ- 
ent Order of Odd Fellows, and has been a 
member of the Universalis! church for four 
years. In the interests of his business he 
traveled all over the county on horseback in 
early days, and has probably traveled more 
miles in thai way than any man in the coun- 
ty. Although now eighty-four years of 
age, he is still active and energetic, and 1 
es a wonderful memory. He is widely 

known and universally respected, having a 
large circle of friends and acquaintan 
throughout this section of the state. 



DENNIS TURNER. 

Dennis Turner, who is now practically 

living a retired life On his farm in Rutledge 
township, has made his home there for al- 
most sixty veafs. and is one of the most es- 
teemed citizens of that locality. lie was 
born on the 24th of September, 1829, in 
Windsor county. Vermont, which was also 
the birthplace of his father. Perry Turner. 
Ills paternal grandfather was drowned in 
the Connecticut river in early life and little 
is known of the family except that his an- 
cestors settled in Xew England in colonial 
days. Perry Turner married Rhoda Stod- 
dard, who was also a native of the <■! 
Mountain state. About 1 833 he removed 
to Champaign county. Ohio, and in [842 
came to McLean county, Illinois, and here 



lived on rented land for two years, when he 
moved to DeWitt county, where he pur- 
chased one hundred and sixty acres ol land 
■ in section 17. Rutledge township, which 
had been entered by Isaac Williamson, and 
about one-half of which had been broken 
and a log house erected thereon. This farm 
is -nil the home of our subject. Here his 
father died of fever in [845, at the age of 
fort) years, ami the mother passed away in 
1N17, at the age of forty-eight. Their chil- 
dren were: I tennis, Marshall \\\, William 
I'., and .Mary A I., all of whom died befi >re the 
mother with exception of our subject. 

Mr. Turner, of this review, succeeded 
to the old homestead, and having entered 
nuie land and purchased other tracts, he 
now ''vviis over live hundred acres. I le built 
a frame house upon his place, ami later re- 
placed this by a mi »re a unmi idii »us am! better 
residence. He also erected a good set of 
outbuildings, has set out fruit and shade 
trcis. and now has one of the best improved 
farms in the locality. In early days he gave 
o msiderable attentii m t< ■ the raising of sheep, 
keeping a flock of about four hundred, bul 
finding other enterprises more profitable, he 
discontinued that business, and for some 
years has made a specialty of raisin- a high 
grade 1 if cattle and hi >gs. 

In 1851 Mr. Turner was united in mar- 
riage with Miss Martha J. Rutledge, who 
was born 111 McLean county in [835. Her 
father was William Jackson Rutledge, a 
sketch ot whom appears on another page of 
this volume. Mrs. Turner was a faithful 
helpmate to her husband in aiding him finan- 
cially and in rearing their line family, an.' 
she was a devout Christian, loved by all 
who knew her. She died in 1866, leaving 
live children, namely: Allen A., who is 
represented elsewhere in this work; Charles 
J., a farmer of Rutledge township; Mary 




DENNIS TURNER. 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RED >RD. 



363 



J., wife of J. \ the same township; 

a farmer of Rul >wn- 

ship; and Martha I)., wi \\ . Bishop, 

whose sketch is foimd elsewhere in this 
ume. ! second wife Mr. Turner v. 

I Miss Man a native of Virginia, 

by whom he has 1. Samuel, a farmer 

uiship. 

g his majority Mr. Turner 

has affiliated with the Democratic party, and 

has ibly served as justice of the 

He has 

lirector, and lias ever taken an active 

part in educational affair-, the first school 

house of Rutledge township being erected 

his farm. He has filled the office of 

township collector, and is regarded as one 

spirited and enterprising 

citizens of his community. For some time 

rented his land but still 1 
its n. In his relig i\ iews h< 

a Universalist and is a man of integrity and 
honor, whose word is sidered as ! 
as his bond. Although he is now quite well- 
'■>. Ik- i- plain and unassuming in man- 
ner, and commands the respect and confi- 
dence of all who know him. 



DEAN WILLIAMS 

:i Williams, one of the leading 
farmers and representative citizens of 
Waynesville township, is now fully 

carrying on the « -1« 1 home farm of nearly two 
hundred acr ction 16. He was horn 

in that township on the 8th of October, 

-+. and throughout his active business life 
has l>een identified with it- agricultural in- 
tere-' - 

His father. Moses <i. Williams, was born 
in Muskingum county. Ohio. December 30, 



l8l2, and of Samuel I.. William-. 

one of the ear! nty ami 

1 Bureau county. Illinois, where 

•ed about i^ On hi- removal to 

tin- mpanied -on. 

Mi h" afterward returned to Ohio, 

was married there in 1835 to Miss Cyn- 
thia McElhiney. He then t • •< >k his l>ri.!. 
Bureau county. Illinois, and in ime 

DeWitt county, where -he died in June, 

1 >f the -i\ children horn of that 
union only two reached maturity, and both 
of these are now deceased. 

E '.in returning Id home in Mus- 

kingum county. Ohio, Moses G. William- 
was married. September 10. 1845, '" Mi-s 
therine E. McElhiney, also a native of 
that county and a sister of his first wife. 
Her father. Judge Matthew McElhiney, was 
horn in Ohio, and became a prominent citi- 
zen of Muskingum county, where he served 
two or three terms as county judge. By 
trade he was a wheelwright, and followed 
that occupation for many year-. He came 
to Illinois and entered land in DeWitt coun- 
ty, on which Mr. Williams settled, mak- 
ing it his home until death. The father of 
our subject died here May 19, 1854, at the 
g of forty-two years, when in the prime 
of life. His widow then took charge of the 
farm and business, which she managed with 
marked skill and ability, at the same time 
uniformly held. 

she removed to the farm of one hundred and 
twenty acres "it section 16, Waynesville 
township, where she now resides. She • 

timable lady, who is loved and re- 
spected by all who know her. 

The subject of this -ketch is the you 
e-t in her family of four children, the others 
beii th M. married 

Wyley Marvel, of Waynesville. ami died. 
leaving eight children, who are now all 



364 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



grown. Mary E. is the wife of William 
Jeffreys, of Schuyler county, Missouri, and 
they have five children living. Barthena 
married James Price and died, leaving three 
children, who are still living. 

Since the age of six years I Kan Will- 
iams has resided upon the farm where he 
now lues, and since the age of fourteen has 
had charge <■! tin' place, relieving his mother 
oi the responsibility and care of the same, 
lie became self-reliant at a ver\ early age, 
as his father was dead, and he is to da) one 
(if the mosl thrifty and skillful farmers and 
ck raiser- <■! his community. The 1 Id 
homestead is a well-improved place, the 
buildings being neat and substantial, and the 
entire surroundings are in perfect harmony 
therew ith. 

In Wapella township, this county, Sep- 
tember .;. 1879, was celebrated the mar- 
riage of Mr. William and Miss Elizabeth 
Cunningham, a daughter of Frank Cun- 
ningham, "tie nf the 1 'Id settlers and substan 
tial nun of that township, whose sketch ap- 
pears elsewhere in this work. She was 
reared and educated in this county. Mi". 
and Mrs. Williams have three children: 
Frank D., Nellie M. and Gladys V. 

Since casting his first presidential vote 
fur Samuel J. filden in 1876, Mr. \\ ill— 
iams has always affiliated with the Demo- 
cratic part\. lie is one of the popular and 
influential citizens of his community, and is 
well worthy the high regard in which he is 
unformly held. 



til VRLES K. ZORGER. 

Among Clinton's prominent and sue 

tul citizens who have retired from active 
business js Charles K. Zorger, who was burn 



in Newbury township, York county, Penn- 
sylvania, January 1. 1831, and is a son of 
John and Elizabeth (Keister) Zorger, also 
natives of the Keystone state, llis paternal 
grandfather was Peter Zorger, who died 
young. The father, who followed farming 
and ran a still house, died when about fort) 
years of age, when our subject was only two 
years and a half old. The mother long sur- 
vived him. passing away in [866, at the 
of seventj eight. Their children were: Su- 
sanna, wife of I!. Brubacher; Adam Henry, 
deceased; Michael, a resident oi White coun- 
ty, ndiana; Jacob K., of Clinton, llinois; 
and ( 'harles K., 1 mr subje 1 

In early life Charles K. Zorger worked 
at farming until eighteen years of age, and 
then went to Vork, Pennsylvania, where he 
learned the plasterer's trade. Subsequently 
he followed that occupation in \\ 1; 1 coun- 
ty, Ohio, f"f two years. On the 171I1 of 
April. [854, he landed in Clinton, Illinois. 
and having become master of his trade, he 
began business here as a contractor. Among 
his first work which is still standing are the 
homes of Dr. Edmiston and Mrs. Bishop, 
and several Stores on the northeast corner of 
the square. 

During the (Til war Mr. Zorger enlisted 
in [862, in Company 1'.. One Hundred and 
Seventh Illinois Volunteer Infantry, and 
served until the close of the war. lie was 
promoted as sergeant, and was serving as 
first lieutenant when discharged, lie is now 
an In mi ired member of the < iraml Army 1 '1 >st 
at Clinton, in which he has held office. 

For a year and a half after his return 
from the war. Mr. Zorger worked at In- 
trade, and then bought the Ray farm of two 
hundred acres in Texas township, which he 
improved and operated for some time and 
which he still owns. In connection with his 
brother, facob K.. he next bought the Alex. 



THE BIOGK APHICAL KFXORD. 



365 



Kelly farm of one hundred and sixty-eight 
acres in Creek township; the Greei farm of 
sixty-five acres in Texas township; the Da- 

\ is farm of two hundred and forty acres in 
Clintonia township. For many years he suc- 
cessfully engaged in general farming and 
stock-raising, and was one of the larj 
horse breeders and raisers in the county, 
making a specialty of English draft horses. 
There is probably nut a better judge of 
horses in the a iunty, and in this line of busi- 
ness he met with most excellent success. In 
[883 he practically retired from business and 
removed to Clinton, purchasing the J. North 
property, which lie improved and later sold, 
it being now used as the Presbyterian par- 
sonage. Buying the G. W. Gideon property, 
he replaced the old house bj a line modern 
residence. Mr. Zorger still retains poss 
sion of his farms, which he rents. In addi- 
tion t" this property he owns in partnership 
with George W. Woy the block <>n the west 
corner of East Main and South Monroe 
streets, which is used fur store purposes. 

Mr. Zorger has been married three times. 
his first wife being Miss Rachel Strominger, 
a daughter of Jacob Strominger, of York 
county. Pennsylvania, and to them were born 
five children, hut only two are now living: 
Lincoln, an engineer, "f Clinton, who mar- 
ried Anna Smallwood and has one child. 
Louis; and Ella, who resiles at home Mr. 
Zorger next married Mrs. Martha it 1 
Wilmore. Hi- third wife was .\|j,, Hulda 
Johnson, a daughter at Eason Johnson, one 
of the oldest citizens of Clinton. Her father 
was hc,rn near Providence, Rhode Island. 
August 13. [814, a son of Joseph ami I.y- 
dia (Cook) Johnson, who were natives of 
the same state ami from there removed to 
Ohio, where his mother died. His father. 
who was a large land owner in Ohio, spent 
his last days in Clinton. Illinois, where he 



died at the age of eighty-two \ears. Eason 
Johnson grew to manhood in Ohio, and on 
the 17th of December, 1835, married Mis- 
Alice Calender, who was also born in Ohio, 
December 2.5, 1816. They are now the old- 
est married couple in Clinton, and are highly 
esteemed by all who know them. Their chil- 
dren are: Nancy, Amos, lluldah. Ira. Alice. 
Joseph !■:., Allura. Lovina and Emma. 

Politically Mr. Zorger is identified with 
the Republican party, and fraternally he affil- 
iates with the Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows, the Encampment and Rebekahs. He 
is the oldest Odd Fellow in Clinton and i- 
past -rand of his lodge. A man of keen 
perception, of unbounded enterprise, his suc- 

5 in life is due entirely to his own effi 
and he deserves prominent mention am. .li- 
the leading and representative citizens 1 if I )e- 
VVitt county. 



STEPHEN Ix. CARTER. 

It has been said that only those lives are 
worthy of record that have been potential 
factors in the public progress in promoting 
the general welfare or advancing the educa- 
tional or moral interests of the community. 
Mr. Carter was ever faithful to his duties 
of citizenship, taking a very active and prom- 
inent part in public affairs, and during his 

intry's hour of trial fought bravely for 
the cause of freedom and union. 

He was horn in Smithfield, Jefferson 

inty, Ohio, January 7. [843, and was a 
son of William E. am! Ruthana (Kinsej 1 
Carter, who were also natives of that county. 
His paternal grandparents were Joshua and 
Sarah 1 Evans) Carter, natives of Maryland 
ami Pennsylvania, respectively. His mother 
died December 31. 1849, and was laid ton 
in the Smithfield cemetery. She has four 



366 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



children, two sons, both now deceased; and 
two daughters* Mrs. John I >. Rogers, of 
Clinton, Illinois; and Mrs. Charles Kerner, 
of [ndianapolis, Indiana. For bis second 
wife the father married Miss Anna Kinsey 
Jordan, who was also b >rn in Jefferson coun- 
ty, ( >hio, and is a daughter of William and 
Elizabeth (Kinsey) Jordan, the formet 
native of Maryland, the latter of North I 
olina. William E. Carter was a cabinet 
maker by trade and followed that occupation 
in Ohio. As a local politician he filled sev- 
eral in his native county, including 
that of justice of the peace In [855 he 
came west, and after spending aboul a year 
in Davenport, Iowa, located in Bloomington, 
Illinois, where the following two years v 
passed. In [858 he came to Clinton, and for 
some time was in the emplo) of the Illinois 
( entral and Wabash Railroad Companies. 
lie is buried in Springfield, Illinois. In pol 
itics he was a Whit;. His wile still survives 
him and makes her home < >n North Quinc) 
street. Clinton. By his second marriage he 
had two children, of whom one is still liv- 
ing, Edwin, a resident of Decatur, Illinois. 

After his father left Ohio, Stephen K. 

ter went to live with his grandparents, 
and remained with them until the winter of 
[858, when he came t" Clinton, where his 
lather had just located. Here he attended 
school until the Civil war broke out. Laying 
aside his l ks, he enlisted in [86l, ill Com- 
pany 1'".. Twentieth Illinois Volunteer Infan- 
try, and at the battle of Shiloh received a 
gunshot wound in the left leg. He was con- 
fined in a hospital for some time, and not re- 
covering from his wound was finally dis- 
charged, lie returned home and for many 
years was compelled to walk with crutches. 
This wound troubled him throughout life, 
anil at times was exceedingly painful. 

After his return from the war. Mr. Car- 



ter attended the Illinois State Normal at 
Normal for two years, wo/king his way 
dirough college by taking care of horses and 
doing chores for the professor with whom 
he hoarded. After his graduation he was 
elected county superintendent of schools in 
DeWitt county, and while filling that office 
devoted his leisure time to the study of law. 

ig admitted to the har in 1X70. Two 
years later he was elected state's attorney, 
and subsequently was selected to till out the 
unexpired term of James A. Wilson as coun- 
ty treasurer, lie also served as county and 
city clerk for one term each. In politics he 
was a stanch Republican, and his career in 
office indicated the confidence reposed in 
him by his fellow cil 

( >n the 9th of April, [867, Mr. Carter 
was taiited in marriage with Miss America 
R. Madden, and to them were born six chil- 
dren, namely: 1 1 1 Grace, the oldest, is de- 
ceased. 1 _• 1 Wilbur M.. who is now engaged 
in the real estate ami insurance business in 
Clinton, married Leila Vauleu. and they 
havi Id. Marian Josephine. (3) Ste- 

phen Kinsey, a farmer of liar]) township, 
married Julia McAboy, ami they have two 
children. Floyd McAboj and Maude Louise. 
Ira I... a resident of Clinton, married 
Daisy Egan and they have one child, Stephen 
Edwin. 151 William J. married Clara Cor- 
bett and lues in Clinton, id) llattie Belle 
is deceased. 

Dr. X. II. Madden, the father of Mrs. 
Carter, was horn in Kentucky. December 1 _\ 
[816, and was a son of Dr. Thomas and 
Ruth (Hollingsworth) Madden, both of 
Scotch-Irish descent. The Dr. Thomas 
Madden died in Vermillion county, Illinois, 
at the age of eighty years, his wife at lin- 
age of seventy-two. Mrs. Carter's father 
was reared and educated in Kentucky, and 
when about sixteen years of age commenced 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



367 



the study of medicine, later attending Rush 
Medical College, Chicago, where he was 
graduated with the degree of M. I >. He 
was married March id. [842, to Miss Aman- 
da Carter, by whom he had two children: 

: and America R., now Mrs 1 

ter. The wife and mother died October 7. 
1X44. when about twenty years of age Hie 
Doctor was again married, October 1. [848, 
his second union being with Mi-s Angeline 
Downey, a native of Virginia, and a dauj 
ter of Darby and Mary ( Burgess) Downey. 
Her father was a soldier of the war of iSu. 
and her grandfather fought in the Revolu- 
tionary war. At the time of his second mar- 
riage Dr. Madden was living in Danville, 
Vermillion county, Illinois, and from thi 
dme to Clinton, DeVVitt county, in Febru- 
ary, 1856. Here he built up a very la 
practice, covering a radius of twenty miles 
an>nnd Clinton. On hi- removal to this 
place he sold nearly all of his household 

ids, and the family had ti 1 eat . iff 1 if bi >xes 
until some furniture could be made, as there 
was 111 1 furniture store in the small hamlet 
at that time. Dr. Madden successfully en- 

:ed in tlie practice of medicine up to the 
time of his death, which occurred April 4. 
1876. He owned a large tract of land ad- 
joining the city on the northeast, which he 
laid out in town lots, it being now known as 
Madden's addition. His political support 
was given the Democracy, and the cause of 
temperance found in him an earnest advo- 
cate. He served as alderman of Clinton, ami 
at the opening of the Civil war presided at 
the first meeting for volunteers in tin- city. 
His health did not permit hi- entering the 
ice. but lie gave liberally of his means 
ami time in aiding the soldiers ami their 
widows and orphans and would never take 
any compensation for such service, lie was 
an active member of the National, State and 



Count) Medical S and w 

treasurer of the DeWitl Count} Medical So- 
ciety while he lay on his deathbed. I 
iously he wa- an earnest member of the 
Methodist Episcopal church, as 1- also his 
widow, whi. -till resides in Clinton. Their 
children were: Mrs. Laura 1 ". McPherson, 
Tin una-. Franklin, Downey, Lockland and 
Mrs. Mary Ruth Johnston. 

I" the city of Clinton Mr. Carter was 
I loyal friend ami one of her foremost 
citizen-. 1 le wa- a 111:111 1 if the time-. 1 
minded, public-spirited and pn His 

influence was great ami always fur \ 
His duties were performed with thi 
care, and throughout life his personal honor 
and integrity were without blemish. 



GE< IRGE WETZELL. 

Among the well-known ami respected 
citizens of Farmer City, Illinois, 
Wetzell, the efficient and enterprising edi- 
tor and proprietor of the Farmer City Sun, 
having occupied this position since October 
1. 1899, succeeding Devore & Lawrence. 

The birth of Mr. Wetzell occurred near 
Abingdon, Virginia, October 9, [857, and 
he i- a -mi of Jefferson Wetzel, who was 
born in Wythe county, Virginia, )uu^- 30, 
1832. The W/etzel family traces it- an- 
cestry far hack t.i one John Wetzel, who 
came t.> America either from Germany or 
Switzerland, and wa- the first settler in 
what i- now the city of Wheeling, West 
Virginia. He wa- a fanner and wa- killed 
by the Indian-, his -mi Lewi- avenging his 
father- death by slaying the murderer. The 
children of John were as follows: Martin. 
Lewis. Jacob, John, I -an ami 

Christina. 



368 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



George Wetzel, who was the greal 
great-grandfather of our subject, removed 
to Maryland and little is known of him 
in the family, except thai he left a son, 
Peter. Peter Wetzel was a farmer in south- 
western Virginia and operated a mill in 
Wythe county. His children were Michael, 
Elizabeth, George, John, Peter and Jessie. 
He died at the age of seventy years. George 
Wetzel, the grandfather of our subject, 
removed to DeWitt county, Illinois, in 
[852, coming by team to Farmer City. By 
trade he was a cooper, and also engaged 
in farming in connection with work at his 
coopering. The grandmother of our sub- 
ject was Margaret, a daughter of Michael 
Commany, who was born in Virginia. The 
family born to these grandparents included 
these children: Henry, Isaac, Si 
.Martin. Annie. Catherine. Rebecca, Mar- 

et, [efferson, Ambrose, George, David, 
and Michael. During the war of [812 
Grandfather Wetzel started to join the 
army, but peace was declared he 

reached the seat of war. In politics he was 
formerly a Whig, hut later became a Re- 
publican, while the religious connection of 
the family was with the Lutheran church. 

[efferson Wet/el. the father of our sub- 
ject, was educated in the public and 

»aged in farming. In [862 he enlisted 
in Company 1. One Hundred and Seventh 
Illinois Drum Corps, and later organized a 
brass band. \\ hen a young man he learned 
the carpenter trade and followed that in 
connection with farming, llis marri; 
was to Miss Catherine Christ, who was horn 
in Virginia, and was a daughter of Daniel 
and Amanda Minnick) Christ. The children 
of this marriage were as follows: William 
A., who married Ella Cummings, lives in 
Salt Lake City: David C. was a minister 



in the Christian church, hut is now de- 
ceased, his death occurring in San Fran- 
cisco: Benjamin F. ; George \V., of this 
sketch: Anna Belle, married C. F. Holmes, 
of I'iatt county; Laura M. married A. ( i. 
Albright; Vinnie R. married Harry R. 
Bates, of Seattle. Washington; Nettie F. 
is deceased; Delia Maud is also deceased; 
and Pearl married L. S. Webb. 

Mr. Wetzel] has been senior vice-com- 
mander of the ( i. A. R. post and has filled 
with efficienc) several political offices, nota- 
bly that of tax collector. Formerly he was 
a Whig, hut is now an ardent and active 
Republican, and has done some excellent 
reportorial work on the Bloomington, Illi- 
nois, newspapers. For many years he has 
been an elder in the Christian church, and 
lias been long connected with the Independ- 
ent Order of Odd Fellows, in which he has 
held high office. 

It was in [859 that George Wetzell, 
our subject, accompanied his parents to 
Farmer City and as early as his fourteenth 
■ began a career which has been one 
of considerable prominence. Under John 
S. 1 harper, who was one of the earliest pub- 
lishers in this city, he served an appren- 
ticeship, graduating into a lirst-class printer, 
lied not only in the mechanical part of 
the business, hut comprehending with ability 
and intelligence to other branches of the 
newspaper work. In 1SN1 he went to 
'i and there became the foreman 
,.f tlu- Bloomington Daily Leader, remain- 
ing for a period of four years, going from 
there to (iieenview. Manard county, to es- 
tablish the Drcenvicw Mail, which for four 
years was one of the brightest little jour- 
nals of that part of the county. Returning 
to Bloomington he became associated with 
the Bloomington Pantagraph and remained 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



369 



in that city for eleven years, leaving that 

l-known journal to purchase his pres- 
ent newspaper in this city. 

Mr. Wetzell was married to Miss Julia. 
the accomplished daughter of Abraham and 
Sarah Pratt, of Bloomington, and their 
three children are: Herbert VV., Frances 
Gail and Gertrude. 

Fraternally Mr. Wetzell is connected 
with the Knights of Pythias and the Mod- 
ern Woodmen of America. Politically he is 
independent, and at the present time h< 

a member of the Farmer City 
school board. lie i- recognized as a 
man of ability and has increased the 
pat] of his paper in a remarkable 

!jree since taking charge. Liberal-minded 
and careful, it has been the aim of Mr. Wet- 
zell to furnish the news to the residents of 

iter City in agreeable form, to mold 

public sentiment in the direction of progress 

and improvement, to advance the inter 

of worthy enterprises in their midst and to 

them a paper worthy of their support. 



WILLIAM H. HARTSOCK. 

Among the successful farmers of Creek 
township. DeWitt county. Illinois, is Will- 
iam II. Hartsock, whi - on section [6. 
He was born in Greene county. Ohio. Feb- 
ruary 25, 1859. and i- a sou 1 je and 
Emily (James) Hartsock, both of whom 
natives of < Ihio. The parents of George 
Hartsock were natives of Virginia, whence 
they removed to Ohio and there lived and 
died. The father of our subject followed 
farming in < >hio, where he was educated and 
where he married Emily James, making that 
state his home until 1853, when, fired with 
the spirit of emigration, he removed to 



Texas township, DeWitt county. Illinois, 
where he had purchased land prior to com- 
ing to the Prairie state. There was but a 
little log cabin on the land, but the brave 
pioneer worked ahead, improved his land 
and dwelling house, and in time prospered 
until he had four hundred and forty acre- of 
improved land. ( )n December 27, [899, he 

died and was buried in W llawn cemetery, 

Clinton. His widow is still living in Clin- 
ton. Illinois. 

Mr. and Mrs, I re rge Hartsock were the 
parent- of six children, all living, namely: 
Emerson, who i- engaged in the grain busi- 
ness and also farm- to some extent in Creek 
township: William II.. our subject: Charles 
M.. who resides in Texas township on the 
home place: E. May. who is making her 
home with her mother; Ralph, who 
in Clinton with his mother. 

Mr. Hartsock attended the schools 
Texas township and worked upon his fath- 
er's farm until he was twenty-one. when he 
and his brother. James, undertook the man- 
agement of the old homestead. This part- 
nership continued for three years, when our 
subject was married and ren tion 

16, Creek' township, where he owns and 
operates one hundred and forty ;-. rich 

farm land which he devote- to general farm- 
ing and stock-raising. The farm is kept in 
excellent condition and the house, barn and 
outbuildings are well cared \ 

On December 25, 1883, our subject was 
married to Miss Emma Ziegler, a native 
DeWitt county, and a daughter of Henry 
Ziegler. one of the early settlers. He 
born in Germany but was brought to Amer- 
ica when a baby and has always f 
farming with the exception of a lew \> 
Spent in a plow factory when a young man. 
Mrs. Hartsock . of nine children, -ix 

of whom are still living, namely: Mary, 



37° 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



who married Henry Weber and they reside 
in Iowa; Henry, who resides in Clinton; 
Mrs. Hartsock; Rose, who married Samuel 
McFail, and they reside in New Jersej : Ja- 
cob, who resides in Iowa, and Arthur, who 
resides in Iowa. The following children 
have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Hartsock, 
namely: Edna, Winnie, Gussie and Bert, 
ail four in school; and Roscoe and ( Ima. 

Mr. Hartsock is a member of Gilmore 
I odge, X". 455. 1\. I'., ami is "ne <>f the 
most active workers in tl nization. In 

pi ilitics he is a 1 Jemocrat and has sen ed most 
acceptably as collector and has also been 
commissioner of the township but ha- never 

ired office, preferring to devote his at- 
tention to tlie affairs of his home and family, 
lie i- a man of high character and Sterling 
integrity, and enjoy- universal esteem in the 
community in which he resides. 



SAMUEL II. M \K I IX. 

Few of Waynesville's citizens are more 
prominent or more widely known than 
Samuel II- Martin, who has been cashier of 
the Waynesville Bank for the past seven 
years. He was horn in Logan county, this 
state, November _•<). 1862, and of 

James S. Martin, who i- a leading farmer of 
that comity. Hi- paternal grandfather, 
James 1'. Martin, was a native of Ireland. 
but during his infancy was brought to the 
United States by his parents, the family l.>- 
cating in Pennsylvania, where he grev 
manhood. Later he spent some years in 
Ohio, and then came to Illinois, making a 
permanent location in h ounty, where 

he was numbered among the pioneers. 

Jame- S. Martin, the father of our sub- 
ject, was horn in Ohio, in [837, but was 
reared in Logan comity. Illinois, and there 
married Miss Caroline Hoblit, a native of 



the county and a daughter of Squire Samuel 
Hoblit, who was another of its early settler-. 
Mr. Martin became a prosperous farmer of 
that county, and a mtinued t< 1 engage in agri- 
cultural pursuits up to the time of his death, 
which occurred 111 1 SS 1 . Ili- wife survived 
him a few years. They were the parents of 
six children, three -on- and three daughters, 
of whom Samuel II. is the eldest. The 
other- are: Ellen M., wife of George W. 
Carlock, of Evanston, Illinois; Charles !•'.., 

;■ business man of Klw 1, Indiana: Mary, 

who died about [895, and the w ife of I I airy 
1 Quisenberry, Jr.. a resident of Logan 
county; Clinton I ).. a business man of Kan- 

1 it\. Missouri; and Melhc. who 1- living 
with her sister in Evansti >n. 

The boyhood and youth of our subject 
were passed upon the old home farm in Lo- 
gan county, and his primary education \ 
received in the public schools of that local- 
ity. Later he attended Lincoln University 
at Lincoln and the State Normal School a! 
Normal, Illinois, and then took a commer 
cial course at Bryanl iV Stratton Business 

lege in Chicago. After leaving school he 

epted a pi >-i t i< ma tor in the First 

National Bank at Lincoln, and later was 
promoted to assistant bookkeeper, remain- 
ing with that institution until September, 
[894, when he w.as elected cashier of the 
Waynesville Lank, and bj able management 
has seen it grow strong and able to meet 
the demands of a p ity and rich 

farm immunity. In this capacity he 

lias since sen ed. 1 [e pi issesses superior busi- 
ness ability and stands high in commercial 
circles. I lis attention is not wholly confined 
to the hanking business, for he i- interested 
in a number of different enterprises. He 
own- one-sixth of the stock of the Mt. Nebo 
Anthracite Coal Company at Russellville, 
Arkansas, where an anthracite coal mine is 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



373 



now in successful operation, it being the 
only one known in the United States out- 
side "i" Pennsylvania. The company ship 
their coal throughout the west. Mr. Martin 
is also the owner of a well improved and 
valuable farm of two hundred and eight 
acres in Bamett township, DeWitt county. 

( )n the [8th of < >ctober, 1887, in Bloom- 
ington, Indiana, Mr. Martin was united in 
marriage with Miss Florence Payne, who is 
a native of thai state, as was also her par- 
ent,-. William L. and Catherine Payne. Sin- 
was reared and educated in Bloomingti 
and attended the Indiana State University. 
By her marriage she became the mother of 
three children: Fay E., James P. and 
Philip S. 

Religiously Mr. and Mrs. .Martin are 
members of the Methodist Episcopal church 
of Waynesville, and fraternally he affiliates 
with Waynesville Lodge, A. F. & A. M. ; 
the Odd Fellows Lodge of the same place: 
Keokuk Tribe, I. O. R. M., of Lincoln. 
Since attaining hi- majority he ha- been 
identified with the Republican party, and 
cast hi- first presidential vote for James G. 
Blaine in [884, but he ha- never cared for 
political hom irs. 1 le ha- served 1 >n the t< >\\ n 
board and al9o the school board, and is pre- 
eminently public-spirited and progressive, 
taking a commendable interest in all enter- 
prises which he believes will advance the 
welfare of hi- town and county. His pleas- 
. genial manner makes him many friends 
and he is held in high regard by all who 

know him. 

— ■»» » '• — 

PROFESSOR KMMukY B. BENTLEY. 

Professor Emmory B. Bentley, who has 
Keen superintendent of the Clinton schools 
for the past three year-, was born in Wesl 

17 



Middelsex, Pennsylvania, Januarj 27, 1865, 

and i- a son of William II. and Margaret 
1 Bailev 1 Bentley, who were farming people. 
Our subject was reared on the home farm 
and began his education in the public schools. 
Subsequently he engaged in teaching in the 
district schools, and in this way earned the 
money t<> finish hi- education, a- many of 
our ablest and most distinguished men have 
done. In [885 he entered Mt. Union Col- 
e of Ohio, alternating his attendance 
there by teaching until he was graduated in 
1 So 1 . 

The following year Professor Bentley 

was principal of the schools at Makanda, 
Illinois; was principal of the high school at 
Murphysboro the same length of time, and 
later wa- principal of the schools at 1 )on- 
gola one year, and Anna for four years. 
This was a gradual promotion, being given 
larger schools each time and better salaries. 
In [898 he came to Clinton a- superintend- 
ent of the c it) schools, 1 '"ich position he has 
e most efficient!) tilled. During this time 
the schools have made wonderful progn 
the enrollment ha- been increased from nine 
hundred to eleven hundred and twenty-two. 
< >n his arrival here the high school had but 
forty-four pupil-, while to-day it has one 
hundred and thirty-eight. This has been 
mainly due to the untiring labor- of Profes- 
tley, who ha- exerted all his influ- 
ence to build up the schools and pronn 
their welfare. The increase in scholarship 
will eventually raise the literary standing 
of the city and he of great benefit to coming 
generations. The Professor ha- not only 
stimulated a desire in hi- pupils for the more 
advanced studies but ha- also done much for 
their amusement, establishing athletic and 
oratorical department-, in which he has in- 
troduced foot hall and other pastimes. In 
contests with other scnools the Clinton 



374 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



schools have gained marked distinction, and 
to day they rank second to none. The high 
soli, m] was built in [867, and the Lincoln 
school in iS<)7. The present teachers are 

follows: Jennie M. G 1. principal of the 

high school and teacher of mathematics; 
\11na Taggart, first assistant and Latin 
teacher; Helen Bryden, second assistant and 
English teacher; Edna Peltz and Lida B. 
Mix in the eighth grade; Trophy \\ right in 
the seventh; Gertrude Emerson in the sixth 
mti seventh; (Catherine < (liver in the sixth; 
Grace McHugh, Anna McPherson and Fred- 
die Porter in the fifth; Ida Strain and I 
tha Miller in the fourth; Clara P.rener, Min- 
Bn iwn and Bell Gideon in the third : May 
< 1 inn. 1 L01 Lett and Bessie Sutton in the 
ond; and Minnie Bradfield, Nettie Berry- 
man and \dila I Innter in the fit 

Professor Bentley married Miss Delia 
Chase, daughter of Charles Chase, of Jones- 
boro, Illinois, and they have two children: 
Beulah B. and I toward 1 1. Socially the Pro- 
fessor is a member of the Knights of Pyth- 
ias fraternity, lie is a man of many ster- 
ling qualities, whose success in life i- due 
entirelj to his own unaided efforts, and the 
city 1 if Clint m owes mi • ogress in 

the past three years to his untiring 



(,!•( >RGE D. GANI >. 

George D. Gano, one of the prosperous 
farmer- of Creek township, resides upon 
section 14. and has been a property owner 
of DeWitt county for many year-. IK 
born in Greene county, Ohio, May C>. 
and was the son of George and Jane 
(Steele) Gano, both of whom were natives 
of Virginia. The lather died when our 
subject was eighteen month- of age. Dur- 



ing his life he worked at his trade of black- 
smith. 

George I >. is the only survivor in a fam- 
ily of six children. lie remained with his 
mother until he was five years of age, when 
he was taken by Mr. I'yle. of Clarke coun- 
ty, Ohio, with whom he remained until his 
benefactor died when George was Fourteen 
years old. Since then he has depended upon 
his own exertion-. The only education the 
ho\ obtained was in the district schools 
and he had but Few of the advantages of- 
d by these. \fter the death of Mr. 
Pyle he worked for an uncle for twelve 
months for thirty dollars and then to work 
for a cousin at five dollars a month, remain- 
ing with this relative nearly a year. \itcr 
working until he was twenty-seven at va- 
rious lines of business, our subject wen! 
chopping wood for a railroad for four- 
11 dollars a month. After finishing that 
labor he commenced farming upon rented 

i in I 'nil in lint) . ( Hiio, but la 
moved hack to Clarke county . where he re- 
sided until 1867, when he came to Creek 
town-hip, DeWitt county, Illinois, and pur- 
chased one hundred acres of unimpro 
land. From time to tune he has added to 
this property and now has a large farm 
consisting of two hundred acre- of land, 
while at one time he owned four hundred 
and seventy-five acre-. Upon this excellent 
farm lie carries on general farming and 
make- a specialty of grain raising, lie has 
put many thousand feet of tile on hi- prop- 
erty and has redeemed part of it from the 
-wamp. making the land one of the he-; 
farms in DeWitt county. In politics he is 
a Republican and prior to the formation oi 
that party wa- a Whig, lie ha- never ta- 
ken any prominent part in party matter-. 
preferring to give his attention to his own 
affairs. 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 






ir subject mar- 

•un- 
ty. i r of Abijah Ward, ■ 

ro Mr. and Mr-. 
n born the following chil- 
- ill married D. X. Merrick. 
ship, and have six children — 
Emanu< Jess Libbie, Lloyd, 

rie, and Maude. Margaret is the wife 
- I '. Merrill, a brother of her 
- •and. and they reside in Creek town- 
ship; Samuel is a resident of Keokuk coun- 
ty, Iowa, and married Mellie B and 
they had one child, which is now de 
Frank, a resident of Creek township, this 
inty, married Sarah Mansfield and they 
had four children, namely. — Welby, In in. 
Roy and Bert, deceased. William. 

iship, married Bina Edwa 
I they had r children, namely. — 

Harr\ . ina. and an in- 

fant de id, living with our sub- 

ject, marrie a and they had a 

child lx>rn to them. — May Marie, and Mrs. 

ed when the little one 
but an infant. 

Mr I in the c 

munity where he has made his home for - 
many years and d the prosperity 

which has attended his en 

n efforts, integ- 
ritv and thrift. 



CHARLES SWIGART. 

E. Charles S igart, mayor of Farmer 
;. [Hinoi lx.rn in DeWitt town- 

ship, this county. March 14. 1859, and is 
- m of Jacob Swigart. He was educated 
in the common and l>egan his busi- 

ness career as a farmer, purchasing a farm 



from Thomas Bryant, of Blue Ridge town- 
ship, Pratt county, and ii - Anna 
township, DeWitt county, consisting 
hundred and eight} 

erty lie made many improvements anil con- 
duct general farming and stock-ra 

3 until 1893, when he rented his 
farm and removed to Farmer City, where 
he purchased the William Allen property. 
E prominent did he become that he was 
lected as alderman, and after serving I 
years in 191 

mayor of Farmer City, which high office 
he tills with distinction. In politics hi 
a Republican and is a leader of his party in 
litj*. 
Mr. - . rt married Clara Arboyart, 
.rhoyart. one of the 
wealthy men of Farmer City. One child 
n born to Mr. and Mr irt, 

na ].. who died when but fifteen months 
of age. ' '—• subject i> a member of the 
K. of P. and is deservedly popular. 



MRS. FRANKLIN VANCE. 

the best known and most highly 
respected la Clinton, Illinois, is Mrs. 

Franklin Vance, whose maiden name was 

becca Parkes. She was horn in Madis 
county. Ohio, and was the daughter of Sol- 
onion and Rebecca Parkes, probably na- 
tives of Virginia. Her husband. Franklin 
Wince, was born in Pendleton county. W 
Virgini; - mber 16, 1837, and was a 
j • and 1 larrii rof) \ ance. 

When but seventeen years of age he came 
ge township, DeWitt county. Il- 
linois, with his parents and they settled on 
fifty-four acres, which they greatly im- 
proved. The children born to Jesse Vance 



376 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



and wife were: Franklin; Sylvanus; Den- 
isa; Pleasant; Dunn; Rexread; Catherine; 
Susan; Robert; Julia; [asbelia; Belia and 
Adelia. 

After his marriage Franklin Vance set 
lied upon a nice farm which he placed in 
a high state of cultivation and engaged in 
general farming and the raising of high- 
bred short-horn cattle and draught horses 
for the market, becoming very successful. 
Ih- death occurred on March 17. 1895, and 
his loss was greatly lamented. 

Five children were born to Mr. and 
Mis. Vance, namely: An infant son. Mae. 
Eva, Dais) \. and William F., and the four 
children who grew t<> maturity proved to be 
great comforts to their parents. 

Mr. Vance was supervisor for seven 
years, having been elected on the Demo 
cratic ticket, and was also township trustee 
for several years, always serving his con- 
stituents with faithfulness and upholding the 
principles of his party. Socially he was 
an active member of the Masonic fraternity 
and was great!) respected in the commun- 
ity in which he resided. 



\l. VNSON I". PARKER 
1 I »eceas( 

Mans, 01 I'. Parker, deceased, one of the 
prominent early settlers of DeWitt county, 
Illinois, was horn in Union county. Ohio, 
and when a hoy moved with his parents to 
DeWitt county, where he Heed until his 
death, which took place at his home four 
miles southwest of Clinton, \pnl 8, [887, 
at th, fortyeight years, five months 

and twenty-nine days. 

.Mr. Parker was a son of John and 
Clarinda Parker, who resided in DeWitt 



county for a great many years and both 
died here. The father was a farmer of Har- 
nett township and at their pleasant home 
their deaths occurred. Eight children were 
horn to them, hut only two are now living. 

Mr. Parker was a supporter of the 
Christian church and he was school direc- 
tor ol fexas township for some years, be- 
ing a Democrat in politics. lie is buried 
in Woodlawn cemeterj of Clintonia town 
ship, lie was an industrious, upright man. a 
good citizen, kind and devoted to his chil- 
dren, and a loving husband, and he is not 
only missed by his immediate family, bul 
hv a large circle 1 if friends. 

On December [9, [867, he married Miss 
Maggie Mills, a native of Kentucky, a 
daughter of William \. and Artimecia 
(.Curl) Mills. Mr. Mills was born in Vir- 
ginia and his wife in Kentucky, lie was 

inner ami followed that occupation dur- 
ing his active life in Kentucky. lie came 
to Illinois with his family in [860 and 

d in Clintonia township. DeWitt county, 
where he resumed his ch Ihng, carry- 

ing on general farming and stock-raising 

to some extent. lie died when about fifty 

yeai me four years after coming 

to Illinois. Mr. Mills affiliated with the 
Whig party and was a member of the 
Christian church. His wife survived him 
many years she died. in Clintonia town- 
ship at tin' age of seventy two years. They 

hail eight children and seven of them are 
still living and residing in this county, 
namely: Catherine. who married Eli 
Brown, a retired farmer of Clinton; Mar- 
garet, wife of Mr. Parker; Polly, who is un- 
married: Nathan, who died at the age ol 
twenty-two years; Zachariah. who resides 
in Texas township and is a farmer; Lucetta, 
who is unmarried and resides in Clintonia r 
|ohn. who C a farmer and resides in Clin- 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



377 



tonia township; Harriet, who is the wife 
of [saiah Samuel, a farmer of Clintonia 
township; and James, \\h" is a farmer and 
i Clintonia township. 
To Mr. and Mrs. Parker were born 
four children, of whom tv -till liv- 

ing, namely: Fran' in operating the 

homestead farm, which cons - ninety- 
four acres of land and he has it in excellent 
condition. He i- a member >>t" the Christian 
church. Tossie married Dickerson W 
and they reside on the home place with Mrs. 

Parker and Mrs. W Is, being engaged in 

farming with Frank. Mr. Wood was lx.rn 
in Texas township, where he has always 
resided. His parents, John and Sus 
(Norris) Wood, are -till living in that 
township, his father being a farmer. To 
Mr. and Mrs. Dickerson Wood three 
children have been born, namely: Lloyd, 
horn on December 1. 1894; Bruce C. horn 
Aug n : ami Marguerite, horn on 

February jo. 1901. At the present time 
Mr. Wo, ..I is collector of the township. He 
is a member i<i the Independent Order of 
Odd Fellows and lie and his wife be' 
to the Christian church. 



URIAH ELIHU HUNT. 

Among the leading farmers of Nixon 
township is recognized Uriah Elihu Hunt. 
He was born in Creek township, Jasper 
county, Illinois. June 28 (849, and is 

William and Margaret (Timmons) 
Hunt. He was a native of Virginia and 
she of Tennessee < >ur subject's paternal 
grandfather, Stephen Hunt, was a native 
-■I Virginia and was a pioneer of ('reek 
township. Jasper county. Illinois, where he 



improved a half section of laud on what is 
known as Hunt's branch, this place being 
named after him. The postofhee at Hunt 
City i* al-o named for the family. His 
wife, whose name was Elizabeth, bore him 

en children, namely: William, who be- 
came our subject's father: Sarah, who be- 
came Mrs. William Henson ; Joseph ; Steph- 
en: Uriah; Elizabeth, who married Levi 
Bonham; and Mary, who became the wife 
of Alex White. Both grandparents lived 
and died in Jasper county, he reaching the 

d old age of ninety-three The 

maternal father was William Timmons, 
formerly of Ohio, a pioneer and prominent 
farmer of Edgar county. Illin 

William Hunt, the father of the gentle- 
man whose name intn his review, 
was reared and married in Ohio, and with 
his parents they all came to Illinois in 1837, 
locating in Jasper county. He drove a one- 
horse wagon, with his wife, son and daugh- 
ter, and his father drove three horses with 
his family. William Hunt took up two 
hundred and eighty acres of land, which he 
improved and at the same time worked at 
the carpenter's trade, of which he has a 
g d knowledge. Here he spent the re- 
mainder of his days, dying in [852 at the 
age of thirty-four years. He was the fa- 
ther of ten children, of whom eight grew 
to maturity, as follows: Francis, Sarah 
married Norman Matheney, Nathan, John, 
Mary became Mr-. Louis Dew William. 
Uriah E., our subject: ami James. All 
are now deceased except L'riah. ami Nathan. 

L'riah Hunt was reared on the "Id 
homestead in Jasper county, where he re- 
ceived as good an education as the public 
schools at that time afforded. At the ; 
of seventeen years he was employed a- a 
farm hand in Cole count v. where he re- 



3/8 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



mained two years. At the end of that time 
he rented land in the same county and tilled 
the soil for his own interests. Here he re- 
mained until [875, when lie purchased 
eight) acres of land in Creek township, Ma- 
son county, continuing there for seven 
years, lie then disposed "t' that property 
and purchased one hundred and sixty acres 
on sections 32 and 33 in Nixon township, 
where he has since resided. 

'in December 24, [868, Mr. Hunt took 
for a helpmate Miss Lucy, daughter of 
Henrj Beem, of Cole, Illinois, hut former- 
ly from < >hio. This union was blessed with 
twelve children, namely: Henry A.; Liset- 
tie. deceased; Eva, now Mrs. William Ba- 
ker; Emma married Gibson Monroe; Dor- 
an; Charles; Mamie became wife of Charles 
\dams; Roberl < '. : \da : Lizzie; William; 
and Lester. While only fifty-two years 
age, Mr. limit ha en grandchildren. 

Religiouslj Mr. limit and family are 
members of the United Brethren church. 
Socially he is a member of Weldon Lodge, 
No. 746, V F. & A. M.. Mozarl Lodge, 
Knights of Pythias, Modern Woodmen, 
1787, Protection League, \ T o. 235. Po- 
litically he is identified with the Democratic 
party, and has held office of supervis* r, col- 
lector and assessor of Nixon township, He 
ha- al\\a\> given his support to tli- >><.• m< 
ures which he believed to prove of public 
hem 



M i^RVEY GRIFFITH. 

Among the prosperous farmers of Harp 
township is Harvey Griffith, of section t6, 
who was born on ( Ictober 22, [853, and is a 
sun of Bayard and Leah (Deffenbauh) 
Griffith. The father was born in Ohio, 
about [819, and was educated in Ross coun- 



ty, that state. Upon coming to Illinois he 
first settled in Mason county, and entered 
one hundred and sixty acres of wild prairie 
land. On this he huilt a cabin and broke the 
land with very primitive appliances. At the 
time oi his death he owned about two thou- 
sand acres in Harp township, DeWitt coun- 
ty, three hundred acres in Shelby county, 
Illinois, and one thousand acres in Kansas 
I lis wife died in [858, and the father later 
married Miss Savilla Reed. lie died in 
1892. By his first marriage he had the fol 
lowing children: Levi, a farmer of Chase 
COUllty, Kansas; Wesley, an extensive farm- 
er nf St. Clair county, Missouri; Newton, 
who is a farmer of Chase county, Kansas. 
and owns twenty-five hundred acres; Daniel 

and Uaac, dec-eased: CdVnelillS, a farmer oi 
Nebraska; our subject; and Amanda, who 
married C. C. Wrighl and they reside in 
Clinton. By his second marriage the fathei 
had six children and five of them are still 
living. I le was .1 I lenn icrat, hut ne\ er 
aspired to ofl 

Harvey Griffith was educated in the 
trie! schools and when he was seventeen 
he went west 1. 1 Minnesota and Kansas, 
where he remained until he was twent) 
live. At this time he returned home and 
married Ida Bodkin, who was born in Lo- 
gan county, Illinois, and was the daughter 
of George and Elizabeth (Walter) Bod- 
kin, both of whom were native of Ohio 
and are now dead. 

After his marriage Mr. Griffith v 
hack to Minnesota and there remained for 
eight years engaged in farming, lie then 
returned to this county and now owns in 
addition t.i the one hundred acres he re- 
ceived from his father's estate, twenty acres 
he added to it. This farm he devotes to 
grain raising and he has been very success- 
ful. In politics he is a stanch Democrat 



THE BI< (GRAPHICAL REC( >RD. 



179 



and is a man held in high esteem by his 
neighbors. To himself and wife have been 
1 m .rn three children, two of whom aru now 
living, as follows: Jacob, who died when 
eight years "i" age; and < lertrude and Frank, 
who arc at home. 



EDWARD DANISON. 

Among the well-known representative 

business men of Lane, Illinois, Mr. Edward 

nison, of the firm of Danison & llart- 

:k, grain and lumber dealers, is worthy 

of special mention not only on account of 

- business enterprise, but also because 
his many excellent traits of character. He 
was born in Franklin county, Ohio, No- 
vember 7. [854, and was a son of Isaac 
and Barbara [Bossinger) Danison. the 
former a native of Maryland and the latter 
of Pennsylvania. The father moved from 
his native state to Ohio with his parents 
when yet a bo) and settled in Perry county, 
where he married, hnt later went to Frank- 
lin county, the same state. When our sub- 
ject was eleven years of age the family 
came to Illinois and located in Creek town- 
ship, DeWitt county, where the father pur- 
chased land and engaged in farming for 
a number of year-. He died in 188] at the 
nty-eight and was buried in Rose 
cemetery. Creek township. His widow is 
living "ii the farm at the age of eighty- 
six. Of the mx children born to them. 
four are now living, as follows: Eli, who 
live* at home with his mother farming the 
old homestead; Mary, widow of Amps 
linegarden and a resident of Br-anW4 
township; Michael, who is living in Idaho 
Springs, Colorado, where he is mining; and 
Edward, our subject. 



The early education of our subject was 
received in Ohio. He came to Illinois with 
hi> parents, remaining upon the home farm 
until he reached the aye of twenty-one. when 
he began business life for himself. After 
his marriage, winch occurred when he \ 
twenty-five, he rented a farm in Dou 
las comity. Illinois, for three years and 
then returned to he Witt county, where 
he purchased land in Creek township, three 
and one half miles southeast of the town of 
Cane. This farm he operated for four 
years, giving the greater portion of his at- 
tention • sing for the market and 
making quite a - f this undertaking. 
In 1894 he came to Lane and purchased 
elevator, which he conducted together with 
Tillman Lane for two years. This partner- 

1 was then dissolved and Mr. Danison 
embarked in the hardware business and con- 
tinued in this line for about a year. In n;oo 
Mr. Danison formed a partnership with Em- 
erson Hartsock, under the firm style of Dan- 
ison & Hartsock. They have erected a line 
elevator which has a capacity of thirty thou- 
sand bushels of grain, and conduct a nour- 
ishing grain, lumber and coal busine 
which has already assumed large propor- 
tions. By adopting and sustaining a uni- 
form method of upright dealing, the mem- 
bers of this firm have established themsel 
firmly in the commercial life of Lane and 
built for themselves a g 1 financial stand- 
ing among the soli<l business men of the vil- 
lage and surrounding country. 

Mr. Danison was married on Xovember 
2 5> l,s; 7.s- to Miss Sarah J. Lane, a native 

DeWitt county, and the daughter of 
Jerry Lane, who was one of the earl) set- 
tlers ot this county and is now residing 
in Lane. Three children were horn to Mr. 
and Mrs. Danison. namely: Eli < Mis. who 
died at the aye of three years; La May, 



3 So 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



who died at the age of six years; Edward 
William, who died at the age of three years. 
Both Mr. and Mrs. Danison are very 
active members of the Christian church, in 
which they arc highly respected and to 
whose support the} are very liberal contrib- 
utors. Mr. Danison is a member ol Gil- 
man Lodge, No. 455. K. of 1'.. and is also 
a member of Lane Camp, X". 1782, M 
em Wpodmen of America. In politics lie 
is a strong Republican ami cast hi- first 
vote for I 'residenl I fayes, bul has ne 
sought or held office, feeling that his pri- 
vate affairs were more than sufficient to 
occupy his time. 



W. C. WILLI VMS 



More than sixty-two years have passed 
since this gentleman arrived in DeWitt 
county, and he is justly numbered among 
her honored pioneers and leading citizens. 
During all of this time he ha- made his 
In inn- in Harp township and ha- been prom- 
inently identified with hi iltural inter- 
ests, lie was born near Covington, Kenton 
county, Kentucky, October 23, 1823, and is 
a -.in of Presley and Rebecca (Bohannan) 
Williams, both native- of Virginia. The 
William- family came originalh from W 
and was founded in America in early colon- 
ial days. Our subject's grandfather, John 
William-, took part in the early Indian wars 
and also in the Revolution, and after the lat- 
ter struggle removed with his family to k 
tucky, the father of our subject being at that 
time a mere lad. Presley William- grew to 
manhood in that -tate and there followed 
farming until called to his final rest at the 
age of forty-eight years. Hi- widow subse- 
quently came to Illinois with our subject in 



[839. In the family were ten children, hut 
only three are now living, namely: -Mr-. 
Lizzie I'.. Harrold, a widow living in De- 
Witt county; Sarah, a resident of Jackson- 
ville, Illinois; and W. C, of this review. 

Mr. Williams acquired a limited educa- 
tion in the subscription schools of Ken- 
tuck), and at the age of sixteen came with 
the family to Illinois, hi- home having since 
been in DeWitt county, lie lived with his 
mother in what is now Harp township until 
he wa- married. On hi- arrival here there 
were but few families in the town-hip. and 
these made their home in the timber, SO that 
for many years one could ride or drive over 
the prairie- in any direction without passing 

a single cabin. Hunting was also g 1 for 

many year-, ami Mr. Williams has often 
-ecu forty or fifty deer in a herd. I le would 
break prairie with four or six yoke of oxen 
and a twentv two inch plow, it being impos- 
sible to use horses for that purpose a- they 
could not stand the hard work. Mr. Will- 
iam- \ i-iied ( ihicagi 1 in [842 and again in the 
spring of [901, witnessing the remarkable 
changes that had been made in that time, the 
place being l>nt a -mall town when he first 
went there. 

1 >n the 5th of < (ctober, [843, Mr. Will- 
iams married Mi-- I.ucimla Harrold. who 
was horn in Virginia, March [8, [822, and 
was a daughter of Eli Harrold. one of the 
earl} -eider- of DeWitt county. Six chil- 
en blessed this union, namely: 1 1 ) Eli 
Presley, born Augusl [9, [844, is now a 
residenl of Kansas. He married Stella 
Fletcher and they have two children. Elmer 
and Charlie. 1 -' ) Martha Ann. horn June 
[9, [846, i- the wife of George Lemon, of 
Kansas, ami they have one child, < >ra. (3) 
Rebecca Frances married Philetis Wakefield, 
and .lied at the age of thirty five years, leav- 
ing three children, Ira, Bertie and Lulu. (4) 




W. C. WILLIAMS. 




MRS. W. C. WILLIAMS. 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 






Emma is the wife of Charles Fisher, of Chi- 
•id they have one child, Nettie, 
ira married M. C. Enos, and died, leaving 
children, Henry. Mattie, Freddie, Delia. 
Bessie and Sarah. (6) Luella is the wife of 
Walter Nixon, of Chicago, and they have 
two children. Charles and Luella. Afte 
happy married life of almost fifty-eight 
years, the wife of "tir subject passed away. 
March 15. 1 «><>i . and was laid to rest in the 
DeWitt cemetery. She was a faithful mem- 
ber of the Methodist Protestant church and 
a n lable lady. 

two years after his marriage Mr. 
Williams remained with his mother on the 
home farm and then purchased one hun- 
dred and sixty acres of land in Harp town- 
ship near his present home, only forty a. 
which had been broken and a log house 
1, fourteen by sixteen feet, stood 
thereon. This place was his home for many 
rs and is still in \ of the family. 

Mr. Williams met with marked success in 
his farming operations, and as time passed 
added to his landed until he had 

eight hundred acres, but has since given a 
part of this to his children, still retaining 
about five hundred acres. He made a spe- 
cialty of the raising and feeding of stock for 
market, which he found a profitable source 
income, and for year- was the leading 
k-dealer of his locality, hut for the p 
years he has practically lived a retired 
life. Always a hard-working, ambitious 
man. his - in life is but the result 

his own industry, perseverance and good 
management. Thoroughly reliable in all 
things, his word in business transactions is 
considered ;: g as his bond, and he 

justly recognized as one of the leading and 
representative citizens of the county, as well 

ne of its honored pioneers. In politi 
he was originally a Whig, but is now a 



stanch supporter of the Republican party, 
and is an earnest member of the Methodist 
Protestant church. 



W. W. JOHNSTON. 

One of the early and highly respected 

citizens of DeWitt county residing at the 
village of Kenney is W. W. Johnston, who 
was born in Madison county. < >hio, on June 
t3, 1*47. and came to Illinois in 1852 with 
parents, John and Mary i McClem- 
ans) Johnston. The father was also a 
native of Madison county. Ohio, and was 
a farmer by occupation. When about forty- 
eight years of age he came to Illinois and 

tied in Wilson township. DeWitt county, 
where he rented a farm and cultivated it 
until the spring of [867, when he moved 
with his family to Tunbridge township and 
engaged in farming on sections (,. 15 and 
10. Here he resided until his death, which 
occurred on the home farm in [865. He 
never aspired to public office and was a 
Democrat in politics and a very public- 
spirited man. His widow survived him un- 
til 1898, when she died in Kenney at the 
home of our subject. She was a member 
of the Methodist church and has been since 
childhood. She is buried at Kenney. Thi 
parents had five children, two of whom died 
in infancy. The living are as folio 

IC .who makes his home with our sub- 
ject, having retired from active life, and 
held some of the township offices, among 
which was that of constable; William, our 
subject: Nancy Margaret, who married 
George E. Mitchell, a minister of the Chi 
tian church of Olney, Richland county. Illi- 
nois. The deceased children were I at 
and Mary. 



3 S6 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



William \V. Johnston, our subject, re- 
mained "ii the home farm until he attained 
maturity, associated with his Father in farm- 
ing, and continued to manage the farm a 
few years after his father's death, llis 
earl) education was obtained in the common 
sch' miK of the neighborhood and of Tun- 
bridge. In [868 he left the home farm, 
which was situated on part of the prfeent 

of the town of Kenney, which hi 
to survey and laj out. \ftcr leaving the 
farm Mr. Johnston became a clerk in a 
large mercantile establishment in Kenney 
and in 1876 lie engaged in business for him- 
self in partnership with Robert Orr under 
the firm style of Orr & Johnson, ami they 
conducted a general store. This partner- 
ship : for twenty-two years without 
change. In [898 Messrs. Orr and John- 
ston disposed of their business and for two 
years Mr. Johnston engaged in a gem 
collection and real estate lntsiness and 
justice of the peace, which office he still 
holds. 1 1< ted a blacksmith shop on 
the site of his old store building in [899, 
hut lie does not give his personal attention 
to this business, aldiough he l;i\cs it a gen- 
eral oversight. \t the present time he is 
one of the aldermen of the village, lie was 
one of the tirst members of the board ol 
trustees of the village atnl has been holding 
that office almost continuously since, and 
has been president of the town hoard for the 
past two years, lie has held every official 
p. -in. m in the township with the exception 

supervisor and many of them for more 
that one term. Mr. Johnston is a member 
of the Masonic fraternity. Henderson 
Lodge, No. 8202; Modern Woodmen of 
America. Camp No. 4.20; Court of Honor; 
and the Farmers' Federation, lie has been 
cretar) of the Masonic lodge of Kenney 
since its organization. He has also held 



office in the Modern Woodmen of America 
since the organization of the camp at Ken- 
ne\ . Mr. Johnsti in is als< 1 a a insistent mem- 
ber of the Christian church, which his fam- 
ily also attend. 

In 1N74 Mr. Johnston was married in 
Springfield, Illinois, to A.ddie B. Turley, 
who was a native of Sangamon count) and 
a daughter of James and Mary B. 1 Ken 
ney) Turley. Mr. Turley was a native of 
nd n ming to 1 1 1 in- >is at an early 
day, the greater part of his life was spent 
in Sangamon county, lie moved to Ken 
ney. where he died about [866, after a few 
years' residence. By occupation he was a 
farmer. The mother of Mis. Johnston is 
still living and resides with our subject 
part of tiie time and the remainder of her 
time makes her home with her daughter in 

■•anion o unty. The uncle of Mrs. John- 
Kenney, resided at Kenney for 
a greal many years and was one of the 
early settlers. lie helped to la) out the 
town and it was named after him, although 
he lived hut a sh.n Mine after that honor 
was ci inferred upon him. 

Mr. and J\li's. Johnston w ere \>< irn ten 
children, all of whom ate still living, name- 
ly: Sylvia Max, now the wife of W. L. 
Watson, cif Macon count), four miles south 
of Kenney. and has one child, Clifford; 
Lusa Myrtle, who reside^ at home: William 
II.. who resides at home and is engaged 
with a railroad: Robert Melvin, who is at 

lie and is a hlacksnlith by trade, hav- 
ing charge of his father's shop: "In Imo, 
who is at In une ; Edna K., in &hi ml : Gro 

and Ki\ Tom. twins: Lolo. who 

is at home: Raymond T.. w ho i> at home. 

When Mr. Johnston first came to Tun- 
bridge township, DeWitt count)' was nearly 
all wild land, lie has seen the county 
changed from its wild state into the rich 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL REO >RD. 






farm land it i> today and has been one of 
the men who have helped make it what it 
i>. He has always taken a great d< 
interest in the improvements of the ■ 

specially in educational matters, and he 
eon a member of the school board for 
at man. and vva- clerk of the 

when the >ch< •« 1 building erect- 

ed. He considers the sch this town- 

ship sufficiently thorough to give hi> ehil- 
ilrcn a g 2 nunon <ch< « ,1 

training. He has always been a pn 
man. public-spirited, ami is held in the high- 
m 1>\ all his fellow citizens. 



Witt county, and the children lx>rn of this 
union are as follow ecil 

Allen and Pearl. In politics Mr. Rutlei 

a Democrat and is now serving as road 
commissioner. Although still a young man 

has demonstrated his ability as a farmer 
and his influence among the people of the 
township i- giving him an e 

sition in the community and making for 
l.im many friends. 



CHARLES GLENDIXXING, Y. S. 



WILLIAM J < KSOX RUTLEDGE. 

Among the prosperous farmer- i f Rut- 
township, DeWitt county, Illinois, is 
William Jackson Rutledge. who owns and 

operate- a line farm and takes an active in- 
in the affairs of the locality in which 
he resid 

•■ subject was horn on the old home- 
stead on - 7, that. township, in 
and here mal lli- education 
was received in the schools of the district 
during the summer months 1' 
ither upon the farm. When he had 
attained his majority he began farmii . 
himself upon forty acre- of land, to which 
he has added cue hundred and twenty acres. 
All tl Jaced under a tine state of 
cultivation andjpuilt the necessary barn and 
I comfortable house. 
At one time hi> farm consisted of two hun- 
dred acres, of which his father purchased 
one hundred and he one hundred acre-, but 
lie ha- di-po-ed of part of this. 

Mr. Rutledge was married to Lucy Par- 
\in. a daughter of George Parvin, of De- 



Among the popular and prosperous men 
of Clinton, DeWitt county. Illinois, one that 
deserves special mention i- Char' - i. 
Glendinning, Y. S., who was horn in Glas- 
- otland, on April 23, 1863. Hi- par- 
ents moved to Canada in [864, having 
-ailed from Glasgow. The father was a 
weaver by trade and followed that occupa- 
tion all his life, although he also fanned 

some extent in the County of Peal, < >n- 
tario, Canada. The mother died in i v 
at the iv year-. ( >ur subject 

was one of a family of five .n'irls and three 
boys and he has a brother who i- also a 
veterinary surgeon. 

Dr. Glendinning was educated first in 
the common sch Canada and at the 

of twenty-three he entered < mtario Vet- 
erinary College at Toronto, and there he 
remained for two year-, taking the full 

rse. In 1889 he was graduated from 
the institution and came direct to Clinton, 
Illinois, where he opened an office and has 
since practiced his profession, lli- client- 
have so increased that he now has 11 
than he can attend to and is sent for from 
all parts of the four neighboring counties 

• m December 25, 1891, he married Miss 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



Florence Newton, who is a native of Illi- 
nois, and whose parents are now both de- 
ceased. Dr. Glendinning is a member of the 
Independent Order of Foresters, the Mutual 
Protection League, the Modern Woodmen 
of America and the Royal Arcanum. In 
politics he is a Republican, but does not 
take an active part in party affairs. Both 
he and his wife are active members of the 
ist church, in which he is a steward 
and treasurer of the Sunday school, 
Mrs. Glendinning is a teacher of the Sun- 
day school and vice-president of the 
Epworth I eague. They are both very 
worth) people and highly esteemed in the 
imunity where they reside. 



J \.\li:s II. WHITEHEAD. 

James II. Whitehead, who is the proud 
possessor of one of the finest farms in 
Texas township, and is himself one ot the 
most scientific and thorough prosecutors 
of agricultural enterprises iii the state, 
native of Illinois, and was horn in 
Montgomerj county. August 20, 1850. 1 1 i- 
parent- are John Q. and Leah-(Light- 
ner 1 Whitehead, the fi >rmer a nativ e of But- 
ler county. Ohio, and an engineer by trade. 
The elder Whitehead is a man of pr< >n< iunced 
characti and is now living in ret 

ment on a small fruit farm in Tunbrii 
township, lie came to Illinois in (849, and 
after remaining for a year returned to the 
vicinity of Hamilton. Ohio, where he was 
an engineer for nearly eight years. He sub- 
equently for a time lived in Indiana, and 
in the fall of 1S07. settled in Woodford 
countv. near Roanoke. Illinois, and 1 
in farming for some years. Eventually, 
however, he settled in Tunbridge township. 



DeWitl county, where he now lives, and 
where, at the age of seventy-six, he is 
hale and hearty, and able to take his 
place among the active citizens oi the 
place. He is a Republican in politics, 
and in religion is a hard shell Baptist. Dur- 
ing the Civil war he enlisted in [863 in 
Compan) 1. < >ue Hundred and Twenty- 
third Indiana Volunteer Infantry, and served 
until the close of the war. participating in 
s, Hue of the impi n'tant battles. I le is a mem- 
ber of the Grand Vrmy of the Republic. The 
mother of Mr. Whitehead died at the home 
in Norristown, Indiana, when he was eight 
years ol age, and is buried in the cemetery 
of that place. 'The lather later married Ma- 
tilda Phillips, a native of Indiana, and the 
mother of six children. Of the first union 
there were four children, three of whom are 
livini 

Mr. Whitehead acquired his education 
in the public schools of DeWitt county. Illi- 
nois, and shortly after the death of his 
mother he began to worl< on the farms in 

the neighborh 1, and was thus very early 

impressed with the serifcus and responsible 
side of life. By 1886 he was enabled to pur- 
chase the present home place, which he has 
improved and transformed into a model and 
remunerative property. .\t first the family 
lived in a small frame house, hut in (899 he 
erected the substantial and comfortable rural 
house, and has also put up splendid barns, 
and convenient general buildings. He is 
engaged in general farming and stock-rais- 
ing, and has a line orchard which yii 
abundantly. His land comprises one hun- 
dred and twent res of land on section 
j j. besides live acres of timber, and he also 
rents and farms two hundred and twenty 
acres on section 27. He is a Republican 
in politics, and has held the office of road 
commissioner anil school director. Frater- 




JAMES H. WHITEHEAD. 




MRS. J. H. WHITEHEAD. 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL REG >RD. 






nally he is connected with the Independent 

Order of < ><I<1 Fellows, Maroa Lodge No. 

3H 

January i, 1879, Mr. Whitehead married 
Maggie Williams, a native of Macon county, 
Illinois, daughter of Andrew and Susan 
( Funk 1 Williams, the former born in Penn- 
sylvania. Andrew Williams came to Illinois 
at a verj earl) day, and engaged in farming 
for many years in Mad mi county, win 
died on June j~. 1901, at the age of seventy- 
two years. To Mr. and Mrs. Whitehead 
have been born the following children: 
Myrtle: Edward, who is deceased; 
Lewis; Sylvia; Leonard; James; and l 
The children were all horn in DeWitt county 
and all were educated in the district schools 
of the township. 



SAMUEL J. CASH. 

nuel J. Cash, postmaster at Rowell, 
Texas township, DeWitt county. Illinois, 
who is also conducting a general store and 
is the operator for the Western Union Tele- 
ph Company at that place, was horn in 
Clairsville, Belmont county. Ohio, Sep- 
tember 8, [857, and is the sou of Samuel J. 
and Elizabeth M. (Adams) Cash. The fa- 
ther was a native of Ohio and was a hatter 
by trade, which occupation he followed un- 
til he removed to Illinois in [849. Here In- 
located in Tazewell county and engaged in 
farming- until 1863. At that time he en- 
listed and served during the remainder of 
theli Civil war. participating in the march 
to the sea under Sherman. His health was 
greatly impaired by the hardships he en- 
dured and he died six months after leaving 
the service. The family having moved to 
Metamora, Woodford county. Illinois, dur- 
ing his absence, he died at this place. The 



mother, who was also a native of Ohio, 
died about ten years ago al Gridli . Mc- 
Lean county. Illinois. She and her hus- 
band had eighl children, seven of whom 
now living and our subject was the fifth in 
order of birth. 

Samuel J. Cash, Jr.. remained at home 
until he attained the age of twenty-three, 
when he learned to be a telegraph operator, 
he entered the employ of the Vandal ia Com- 
pany at Farrington, Illinois. \\<.-t\- he re- 
mained for one year and then was tra 
ferred to Kenney, in DeWitt county, wl 
he worked for two years. His next re 
moval was to Rowell, where he has since 
resided and is still station agenl for the 
Vandalia Company at this point and also 
agent for the Adams Express Company. In 
his several capacities Mr. Cash gives entire 
satisfaction and is highly respected in the 
community. He is a member of Kenney 

tamp. No. 4_'''. Modern W linen of 

America. In politics he is a Republican, 
but has never held office. 

< >n January _'4. [886, he was married 
to Miss Addie D. Armstrong, who was 
born in Tunbridge township. DeWitt coun- 
ty, and is a daughter of Hiram and Mary 
(Burkett) Armstrong. Hiram Armstn 

■ a fanner of thai township, where he 
lived until a few years before his death, 
which occurred about five years ago al New- 
man, Douglas county, Illinois, and his wife 
died about two years earlier. To Mr. and 
Mrs. Cash five children have bees born and 
four of them are still living. They were as 
follows: Leah and Eva, both at home: B 
tie, who died at the age of three years; 
William and Cordon. All of the living 
children are receiving excellent educations 
in the public schools and all of them were 
horn at Rowell, Texas township, where Mr. 

Cash has resided since his marriage. 



396 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



ARCHIBALD T. McKINNEY. 

One of the early settlers and highl) re 
spected citizens of DeWitt county, Illinois, 
is Archibald T. McKinney, who owns and 
occupies two hundred acres of rich farm 
land on section 22, Texas township, lie 
is a native of Indiana, born May 24, [837, 
and moved from there October 14. 1847, 
with his parents to DeWitt county, Illinois, 
they settling in Clintonia township, where 
the) remained ten yea 

Our subject is a son of Archibald T. 

; Polly (Givens) .McKinney. The fa- 
ther was a native of Kentucky and cam< 
Indiana at an early day and located in 
Pi sey county, where he engaged in farming 
until moving i" Illinois. After coming t'> 
this state he continued farming and at the 
i his ten years' residence in Clintonia 
township he removed t" Texas township, 
where he purchased a farm 1 'it section -'.^. 
Here he lived until hi-- death, which 
curred in July. [873, when he was seventy 

years of age. I lis wife passed awav when 
Our subject was only three years of age 
and is buried at Mt. Vernon, Indiana. Both 
the parents were devout members of the 
hard-shell Baptist church. Oftheir eighl 
children, our subject is the only one now 
living and he was next t.> the youngset in 
order of birth. 

Archibald T. McKinney remained at the 
home place until he was twenty-one ) 1 
of age, and then engaged in farming for 
himself in Texas township, where he pur- 
chased five acres of land, which he still 
owns. IK- added to this piece of land, but 
rents the property which he farms and has 
heed upon it for over twenty-two u'aix. 
lie has engaged in general farming and 
stock-raising, the latter being his principal 
business for many years. Our subject raises 



high bred cattle, horses and hogs. For the 
past twenty years he has been road commis- 
sioner and is holding that office at the pres- 
ent time. In politics be is a Democrat and 
is verj acini.- in the working of the party. 

On January 22, 1857, he was married 
to Amanda ('ox. She is a native of De- 
Witt county and a daughter of George and 
Mary 1\. (Fruit) Cox. -Mr. Cox was a 
native of Kentucky, as was his wife. They 
came to Illinois about [829 and located in 
Texas township, DeWitt count) (then Ma- 
con county). They purchased a home just 
south of Mr. Melxiuuey's present home. 
The father died on this farm at the age of 
Port) eight and his widow survived him 
and died about four years ago. During her 
girlhood days Mrs. McKinney lived with 
her maternal grandparents, Thomas and 
Elizabeth (Thompson) Fruit, who came to 
Illinois at a very earl) day and located in 
Tunbridge township, where they resided un- 
til their death, the grandfather dying at the 
age 1 if eight and his wife at about 

seventy-five, lie was a farmer all his 
and was quite successful. From the time 
she was two years of age until her mar 
riage Mis McKinne) made her home with 
those excellent people and was very much 
attached ti 1 them. 

Her paternal grandparents, David and 

Polly (McGee) Cox, came from Kentucky 

to Illinois about [820 and located in 'Texas 

township, where both died at an advanced 

During his active life Mr. Cox was 

farmer. 

'The children born to Mr. and Mrs. Xb 

Kinney were as follows: George T., who 

resides mi the home place: John T.. who 

also resides on the home place and has the 

resides in Clinton. Illinois, and married 

misfortune of being blind: Charles \\\. who 

Emma Lauereaux; Flora, who is the wife 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RED )RD. 






Martin Williams, a retired fanner of 
Clinton, Illinois; Seymour, who resides in 
Creek township, DeWitt count) - , and mar- 
tidy, a daughter of John 
idy, late of Texas township; Laura, who 
the wife of M. B. Jenkins, a tanner of 
Texas township; Enoch, who died at the 
of eleven months: Birdie, who died at 
the age of nine months; James, who resides 
in Decatur. Illinois, and married Gertrude 
den. who is a native of Texas town- 
ship; Robert, who married Emma Blasin- 
game am • in Texas township. 

All of the children were horn in De- 
Witt county and all except Laura and 
h were born in Texas township. 
When McKinney first came to Texas 
township it was nearly all wild land and he 
n it developed from its primitive 
state to one of the richest farming districts 
in the state. In fact he and his father were 
among the men who helped make DeWitt 
county what it is today. 



i LGE D. RUDAVILLE. 

Among the prominent and highly es- 
teemed residents of DeWitt county, during 
his busy and useful life, was je D. 

ille. who was horn in Logan county. 
Ohio, on April 20. 1852, and v 
of Winfield and Lydia (Sutton) Ruda- 
ville, the former of whom was a native of 

lia. and the latter 1 .1' < >hi. .. 1 I 
Rudaville was reared on the farm where 
his father died and where the mother is 
still living, lie was the third in order of 
birth in their family of eight children. 

Mr. Rudaville acquired his education 
in the common schoools of Logan county. 



Ohio, and lived there until coming to | 
Witt county. Illinois, in [873. For one 
year after coming to this state he lived with 
an uncle and then rented land and v 
to farming, deciding to make this 

e his home. In [882 he bought sixty 
acres of land, all of which was heavily tim- 
bered, later bought forty acres more and 
still later sixty acres At the time of his 
marriage he and wife w< 1 a tract of 

ty acres adjoining the forty, hut it. I 
was unimproved, twenty of which was cov- 
ered with timber. They lived in a small house 
here until their elegant resilience was fin- 
ished in 1896. .Much of his success Mr. 
Rudaville attributed to the ready am! cheer- 
ful assistance given him by his most esti- 
mable wife. 

On April 1. 1875, Mr. Rudaville mar- 
ried Miss Emily Torbett, who v\a^ a daugh- 
ter of Charles P. and Susanna (Fenner) 
Torbett. 'The father was a native of Dela- 
ware, the mother of Ohio, hut Mrs. Ruda- 
ville was born in this county. 'The chil- 
dren of .Mr. and Mrs. Torbett numbered 
twelve, as follows: William, a resident 
Jacksonville: Lucy J., who married Ge 
R. Sutton: Sarah Elizabeth, deceased: Em- 
ily, the widow of Mr. Rudaville: Elmira, 
who married A. Lincoln I.eman. an under- 
taker of Clinton: Charles R.. deceased; 
Rhoda, who married Calvin Talbert and 
lives in Kansas; Kl'tie. who married a 
Mr. Hinchley and lives in Clinton: 
F., a resident of Harp township; John, de- 
ceased; Alice and Ora, twins. 'The father 
and mother reside at Clinton, in a pleasant 
home on East Main street. 

Mr. and Mrs. Rudaville had a family 
of two children. — Asa ].. who was edu- 
cated at the Dixon Business . where 
lie took a full course after going through 



398 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



the Clinton high school, and is a very 
bright young man; and Oro. The death 
of Mr. Rudaville occurred March iS, [898, 
and he lies at rest in VVoodlawn cemetery. 
He was prominent in the councils of the 
Democratic part) and served most efficient- 
1) as road commissioner for a long period. 
Hi- religious connection was with the Chris 
tian church at VVapella, while his son, the 
efficient manager of the farm, is a member 
of the Methodist church. In the Masonic 
order Mr. Rudaville was well and favorably 
known, lie was a man of superior order 
of mind, public-spirited and progressive and 
did his part toward the growth and develop- 
ment of the natural resources of DeWitt 

ci iunty. 

— ♦ « » — 

( \IT MX I. \\ . RE \I»N 



On November 4. 1847, he was married 
to Miss \Kie Morris, a daughter of Jack 
and Mary Morns, and eight children were 
born of this union, namely: Luanda, who 
married John Watson ; John, who married 
Clara Ried, is an attorney; Robert C, who 
married Finette Melton; James M.: Ros- 
ella. deceased; Wesley M.. who is an at- 
torney and married May Miller and after 
her death married Lizzie Fetter; Mary, de 

sed; ( harles \\ .. who is single and a 
tanner. 

Captain Read) is an earnest member of 
the Christian church, as is Ins wife of the 
Baptist church, and both arc very worth) 
and good people and highl) respected by 
a large circle of friends lie 1- also an ac- 
tive member of the Grand Arm) of the Re 
public and takes a great interest in all mat- 
ters pertaining to the pi 1st. 



ptain J. W. Ready has been a 1 
dent of this locality -nice [866, when he 
came to DeWitl county, Illinois, settling 
in Rutledge township, where he engaged 
in farming on sixt) acre- which he pur- 
chased. Later he bought the adjoining one 
hundred acres and now owns one hundred 
and ninety acres, on which his oldest 
resides. All of this propert) is highly im- 
proved and contains a requisite number ol 
buildings. 

Our subject was horn in Virginia in 
[846, near Hagerstown, and after several 
removals came to Illinois. In iNoj 1 
listed in Company C. Illinois Volunteer In- 
fantrv. being made captain of that company. 
After a Ion- and faithful service, during 
which he participated in many of the im- 
portant battles of the Civil war. he was 
honorably discharged on account oi dis- 
ability in i8<>4. and returned to his peace- 
ful occupations. 



ISA \c ELLINGTON. 

1 here i- particular satisfaction in rev< 
ing to the life history of the honored and 
venerable gentleman whose name introdi 
this review . since his mind hears the impi 1 
of the historical annals of the state of Illi- 
nois from early pioneer days. Smce [828 
he has made his home in this section oi 
stale, and has been a resident of DeWitt 
county for over half a century, lie is now 
living on section [6, Barnett township, 
where he has an excellent farm of four hun- 
dred and eight) a. 

Mr. Ellington was born on the 6th of 
April, ioj_>. in Madison county, Ohio, and 

coi ies 1 if l; 1 old Revolutionary stock. I lis 

paternal grandfather, John Ellington, aided 
the colonies in their struggle for independ- 
ence, ami became one of the pioneers of Ken- 




ISAAC ELLINGTON. 



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MRS. ISAAC ELLINGTON. 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECOK1'. 



403 



tucky. ( >ur subject's father, David Elling- 
ton, was lwrn in that state, and at an earl) 
day removed with his father to ( >hio, where 
ew to manhood and married Miss I'ath- 
erine Huffman, a native of Ohio. Her la- 
ther. Esquire Huffman, was soldier 
of the Revolutionary war. For some years 
after his marriage David Ellington was en- 
I in farming in the Buckeye state, and 
in 1828 came to Illinois by wagon. He took 
nj) a claim in McLean county, where he im- 
proved a small farm, but later removed to 
what is now VVaynesville township, DeWitt 
county, and bought a farm of two hundred 
acres, "ii which he spent the remainder of 
his life. I le 'lied in [886, and his wife died 
later, both being laid to rot in the VVaynes- 
ville cemetery. 

Isaac Ellington, of this review, was 
principally reared in McLean county, ami 
well remembers when Bloomington con- 
tained but three houses, and one of these 
was a blacksmith shop. In those early days 
when this region was all wild and unim- 
ed the family were forced to endure 
many hardships and privations such as are 
incident to pioneer life. Our subject as- 
his father in the arduous task of open- 
ing up a new farm, and with his breaking 
team has turned many an acre of virgin -oil. 

In 184'' Mr. Ellington was married in 
VVaynesville to Miss Lucy Ann Nichols, 
who was horn in Muskingum county. Ohio, 
March 12, 1830. Her father. M. P. Nich- 
ols, was Itorn in England in lNu. and when 
a child came to the new world, locating in 
Ohio, where he wedded Miss Mary McCon- 
naha, a native of Muskingum county. In 
1838 they came to DeWitt County, Illinois, 
and settled in Wapella township, where Mr-. 
Nichols died. July 18, [839, and her hus- 
band the day following. Their remain- were 
interred in Wapella cemetery. In the fall 

18 



after the death of her parents. Mrs. I'll: 
ton returned to Ohio with an aunt and there 
spent the winter. The following Spring she 
and a younger sister again came to Illinois 
with a family, hut had to walk the entire 
distance of five hundred and fifty miles, 
sleeping on the ground at night. She then 
made her home with David Ellington until 
her marriage. Her early life was full of 
hard-hip-, hut she always made the most of 
her advantages, ami by her industry and 
economy materially assisted her husband in 
getting a -tart in life. They began their do- 
me-tic life in a small house on the farm 
where he still resides, hut at that time they 
had no near neighbors and were often very 
lonely. For fifty-five years they traveled 
life's journey together, sharing ii- joy- and 
sorrows, its adversity and prosperity, and 
— -ire only parted when death claimed Mrs. 
Ellmgton, September '>, 1901. She left 
man_\ friends as well as her immediate fam- 
ily to mourn her lo--. 

After his marriage Mr. Ellington re- 
mained tin the home farm with his father 
until 1850, when he purchased eighty acres 
y>\ wild prairie land where he now resides, 
and commenced the improvement of his 
farm, which he has increased until it now 
contains four hundred ami eighty acre-, and 
i- under a high state of cultivation. His 
home is a large neat residence, and every- 
thing about the place is in perfect harmony 
therewith. Besides his valuable property he 
owns two piece- of timber land of fifty-six 
acres. Hi- life ha- been one of industry and 

illness, and due success ha- not been de- 
nied him. The Democratic party has always 
found in him a stanch supporter of it- prin- 
ciples, hut he has never cared for office, pre- 
ferring to give his entire time and attention 
to his farming interests. 

Mr. Ellington has two children : Cyrus, 



404 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



the only son, helps to carry on the home 
farm, and like his father, votes the Demo- 
cratic ticket. Martha is now the wife of 
Jefferson Sprague, who also lives with our 
subject, and they have five children, name- 
ly: Carter. Harry, Ralph. Frank and Carl. 
The family is one of prominence in the com- 
munity where they reside. 



AL( )\/( » D. M< HENRY. 

Alonzo 1 >. Mel lenry. one of the suhstan- 
tial business men of Clinton. Illinois, was 
horn .hi November 15. [834, in Muskin- 
gum county, < 'hi", and is a son of Alex- 
ander and Mary Unth 1 Mel lenry I Alt 
ander, the former a native of Virginia, and 
the latter of Ohio. The great-grandfather 
came from the north of Ireland and he was 
of Scotch-Irish descent. Bodi he and grand- 
fatli r subject were brave soldiers oi 

the Revolution. Alexander Mel lenry. the 
father, w a-- a harness maker by trade. In 
[837 he moved to Illinois, settling in Peoria 
count), and thence came to Clinton, where 
he worked at his trade until his death, which 
occurred in 1857. The mother died in [840. 
Six children were born to these parents, three 
of whom are now living, namely: Buretta, 
who live- in California and married John 
Smith : B. P., who re-ides in Clinton; Alt mzo 
1).. our subject, who was the third in order 
of birth. 

Alonzo D. Mel lenry was educated in the 
im .11 schools nf the district in the winter 
and wmked upon the farm in the summer. 
When he was about fifteen he lost his 
mother, and lie then learned the trade of 
wagon maker. During the excitement over 
discoveries of gold in the west. Mr. McHenry 
made a trip t<i Tike's Peak and although he 



did not gain much else, he returned rich in 
experience, in the fall of [859, and during 
the succeeding winter gladly worked at 
whatever he found to do. 

In August, [861, he enlisted at Clinton 
in Company F, Forty-first Illinois Volun- 
teer Infantry under Captain I >. F. Brown. 
I le participated in a number of engagements, 
including the battle of Shiloh and was at 
Vicksburg until after the siege was ended. 
I le was with Sherman in his campaigns, and 
at Jackson. Mississippi, he had the misfor- 
tune tn lose hi> left leg just below the knee. 
Lying wounded upon the field of battle he 
was taken prisoner and the only care lie re- 
ceived was from his comrades in affliction. 
I lad his wound not been neg shame- 

fully his leg would probably nol have had to 
he amputated. On Januarj (., [864, he was 
sent t" Jefferson barracks and thence he made 
hi- way hack to Clinton t" resume his life 
struggle, having given of his best to his 
uintrv. 

In the fall of 1864 he was elected sheriff 
and after two year- he was made deputy 
sheriff and at the expiration of his services 
in the latter capacity he wa- again elected 
sheriff. In [870 he associated himself with 
the firm of Wolf & Mel lenry. hardware 

■its. but after irs he was in business 

for himself for one year. Hi- next busi- 
ness venture was with a furniture house and 
continued in that line until [882, when he 

1 his interest and speculated in mules, 
(lour, grain and other commodities, being 
quite successful. Later he embarked in the 
hardware business w ith a Mr. Wolf, but after 
a year the latter withdrew and I. X. Barton 
entered the firm under the style of Mel lenry 
& Barton. This continued until January, 
iS.|_>. when Mr. McHenry sold his interest 
and retired. 

Although not actively engaged in busi- 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



405 



ness life, Mr. McHenry is largelj interested 
in some very productive coal mines and is 
vice-president of the old electric light and 
heal company. For a number of times he 
served as mayor of the city, having been 
elected on the Republican ticket and has 
been an alderman for a great many year-. 
Hi- devotion to his party is well known and 
he is recognized as a leader in local affairs. 
Always taking a deep interest in school mat- 
ters, he has long been a member of the school 
board, and for two years served as it- presi- 
dent. 

On January ;. [865, he was married to 
Miss Meline Miller, at Pekin, Illinois, and 
she was a daughter of John and Ellen Miller. 
John Miller was a native of Virginia and his 
wife of Indiana. Five children were born to 
Mr. and Mrs. McHenry. namely: Ida, who 
lives at home; Grace, who married D. D. 

e, of St. Paul, Minnesota, and they have 
one child. Alonzo Dean: Winifred, who 
married Dr. S. 1.. Thorp, of Kansas, and 
they have two children, Vita and Alonzo V. ; 
Mary J., who married Julius G. Royce, in 
the grocery business at Clifton, and they 
have one child. Mefcialu; Arthur M. The 
beloved mother died on March _>7. [880, and 
is interred in Woodlawn cemetery, having 
been about thirty-seven years of age at the 
time <>i' her death. 

dally Mr. McHenry is a member of 
the Masonic fraternity, DeWitt Lodge, No. 
84, and Goodrich Chapter, No. 59, of which 
he has been high priest for the past ten year-. 
lie ha- al-o held minor offices in the lodge. 
Mr. McHenry i- al-o an active member of 
the Grand Army of the Republic, and has 
held the position of assistant commander in 
the Clifton Post. lie possesses the ran' 
combination of keen business sagacity with 
open-hearted, open-handed generosity and 



and he is universally respected .and beloved 
for his public spirit and his high moral 

icter. 

— +—+ — 

HUGH DAVENPORT. 

< >ne of the prosperous farmer- of ('reek 
township. DeWitt county. Illinois, is Hugh 
Davenport, who was born in Texas town- 
ship, DeWitt county. October 27, [844, and 
i- a son of l-aiah and Nancy (Shiplej 1 
Davenport, who were born in Kentucky, of 
Irish de-cent, and were married in DeWitt 
county. Illinois. When l-aiah was four- 
teen years of age, in [826, his father, 
George Davenport, came with his wife and 
family to this portion of the state in an ox- 
cart and settled upon ten acre- of land west 
of Springfield where he built a log house. 
The family born to George Davenport and 
In- wife was as follows: Betsy, Polly, 
Katie. Isaiah, Nancy and Hugh. 

The father of our subject wa- educated 
in the district schools ami worked upon the 
farm of his father. After attaining to 
manhood he came to DeWitt county with 
his brother Hugh and settled in Clintonia 
township, where he entered one hundred 
and twenty acres of wild prairie land and 
erected the first house in what is now Clin- 
ton, as that city is located upon this farm. 
After living tin about ten years he 

sold the property and purchased one hun- 
dred and twenty acres of wild land in Texas 
township, of which he cultivated eighty 
and left forty for timber. The house he 
built upon this land in iXjn is -till thought 
to be standing. In 1851 he sold lus prop- 
erty there and bought eight) acres in Creek 
town-hip. which our subject now owns. 
A small portion of this was broken and a 



406 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



small cabin, fourteen by sixteen feet, was 
erected upon the property. This house Mr. 
Davenport improved and afterward rebuilt, 
and he put the farm in excellent condition. 
Here he resided until l88l, when he 
bought one hundred and sixty acres and 
sold the eighty acre-. Later he sold thai 
property and purchased eight) acres 
mile south on sections to and 11. (.'reek 
township, where he died the 27th of Octo 
ber, (886. 

By his first marriage Isaiah Davenport 
had fourteen children, of whom our subject 
is the seventh in order of birth. Five ol 
these fourteen children are now living, 
namely: Lucinda, who married Joseph 
Hanson and lives in Creek township; Jerry, 
who i> a retired farmer at Weldon, Nixon 
township; Alsiena, who married Asa * 
nfer and lives in Kansas; Hugh, our sub 
jeel ; and William, who lives in Kansas. The 
mother died in [853, when aboul thirty-live 
years of age, and was buried in Texas town- 
ship. The father later married Miss Jane 
Bennett, a native of Illinois, and to this 
union were horn five children, who are liv- 
ing, namely: Gabriel 1'... who lives in Kan- 
sas; Green I... who lives in Franklin coun- 
ty, Illinois; Laura, who married Monroe 
Bell and lives in Lane: Nancy, who mar- 
ried \V. Sutton and resides in Macon coun- 
ty. Illinois: and Goldman, who lives in 
Iowa. The second wife died in 1878, when 
aboul fifty-five, and was buried in Texas 
township. Isaiah Davenport and both wives 
were earnest members of the Baptist church 
and he was a very religious man. In poli- 
tics he was a Democrat and held many of 
the local offices, including that of justice oi 
the peace f( r many years. 

Hugh Davenport received a very limited, 
education in the district school held in a log 
cabin with slab benches and -teased paper 



windows. lie also attended a subscription 
school, but as his father's family was a 
large one the children were obliged to take 
turns, for he could not afford to send them 
all at once. Before he was seventeen our 
subject, fired with the spirit of patriotism, 
enlisted on August 1. [861, for three years 
at Clinton in Compan) F, Forty-first llli- 
is Volunteer Infantry, Captain David 
Brown in Command. .Mr. Davenport was 
in the battles of Forts Henrj and Donelson, 
Shiloh, Carthage, Tallahassee, forty days' 
siege "i Vicksburg, and Jackson, Mississip 
pi and participated in part of the celebrated 
inarch to the sea. lie was mustered out at 
Springfield, Illinois. He never received a 
wound or was captured. 

When he returned home he commenced 
farming in Creek township. In 1S70 he 
purchased forty acres of land, to which he 
added eighty acres more, and then sold that 
farm and purchased an eighty-acre tract. < >u 
this property he erected a large and com- 
fortable house and necessar) outbuildings, 
planted shade and fruit trees, and now has 
one of the most pleasant homes in the coun- 
ty. The farm is devoted to -rain ami stock- 
in- and Mr. Davenport is very sure. 
ink 

On October _'_•. 1865, he was married 
to Miss Mary A. Hull, a native of Sanga 
mon county, Illinois, and a daughter of 
lames and Kate (Davenport) Hull. Mr. 
Hull was born in Scotland and came to this 
country at an early day. Mrs. Hull was 
from Kentucky. To them live children 
were born, all of whom are still living, 
namely: Andrew, who lives at Clinton; 
lames, who is in Mason county; Hugh, who 
lives in the state of Texas; Elizabeth, who 
married William Davenport, of Kansas; 
Mary A., wife of our subject. Seven chil- 
dren were born to Mr. and Mrs. Davenport, 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



407 



namely: James, woh died in childhood; 
Katie, who married Nelson Luttell, a native 
of Illinois, and they have six children, — 
James, Dorvin, Guy, Raymond, Grace and 
■Nellie, I; David, who died young; 

Ollie; Allien; Cora; and VVinfield, who 
died in childhood. 

Mr. Davenport and family are members 
of the Christian church, in which he was 
and elder, but resigned. In polities he is a 
Democrat and served for a number of years 
commissioner of highways. Socially he 
is a member of the order of Knights of 
Pythias of Lane, and is as popular in that 
I inization as he is highly repsected 
throughout the neighborhood in which he 
resides. 



RODNEY P. HILL. 



Rodney P. Hill, who descends from an 
old English family and is one of the influ- 
ential men of Clinton. Illinois, was horn 
on April 20, 1834, in Henry county. Ken- 
tucky, and is a son of I ieorge L. and Louisa 
V. (Hickman) Hill. The father was a 
native of Virginia and the mother of Ken- 
tucky. The maternal grandfather, Hick- 
man, participated in the war of the Revo- 
lution. 

orge Hill went to Kentucky when a 
small hoy with his mother, his father hav- 
ing died when he was in infancy, and he re- 
ceived his education in Kentucky, where he 
remained until 1837, October 14th. when 
he came to Illinois and purchased six 
hundred ami forty acres of land in Texas 
township, DeWitt county, paying five dol- 
lars an acre for it. Very little of the land 
had been broken and there was hut a small 
lo^r C abin with dirt floor on the property. 
Realizing how rough and difficult life would 
he in such wilds. George went to work and 



1 had a nice house put up that had four 

:ns down stairs and two in the loft, and 
also erected a log Stable. He hauled the 

n to Chicago with ox teams, taking 
10 last three weeks and 
bringing hack provisions and necessities 
1 for a year. He also dealt exten- 
sively in salt, selling it to his neighbors at 
ninety cents per bushel, and also shelled 
his corn and that of his neighbors. His 
method of doing this was original. He 
placed the ears of corn through a hole in 
the wagon box and forced them through 
by hand. By hard work lie was enabled to 
place the greater portion of his land under 
cultivation and lived to see green fields 
where he had found tracts of timber. 

In polities Georg Hill was an old-line 
Whig and later a Republican. Roth he and 
his wife were members of the Baptist 
church and always took an active part in 
all its work. For several years services 
were held in his house and he was a deacon 
in that body. The influence of his noble, 
Christian life was widely felt throughout 
the community, for he was a man who lived 
his religion in his life, and on account of 
his integrity his word was always consid- 
1 as his bond. This honorable 
and honored man lived to the advanced 
of ninety years, dying in 1887, and his wife 
died the previous year, when about eighty- 
six years, and both are interred in \Y. 
lawn cemetery at Clinton. The part t! 

took in the settlement of this 
portion of the state was minent one. 

liny were anion-- the first settlers and they 
not only endured the privations, but aided 
others to bearoip under their load and many 
a weary life was brightened by the efforts 
of Deacon Hill and his most excellent wife. 

Rodney 1'. Hill, our subject, came to 
DeWitl county with his parents when hut 



4o8 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RED >RD. 



three years old, making the trip overland 
in a wagon, although his mother rode on 
horse hack all the way, with the- youngesl 
boy in her arms, and during that long jour- 
ney but one night was spent in shelter. 
Rodney was educated in the log school 
house of tin.- neighborhood, with its rude 
benches and many inconveniences, and 
worked upon the farm during the summer 
months. This school was a subscription 
^uu' and the children had to take turns 
in attending, as the expense was too great 
to admit of their gi ling all at once. After he 
reached the aye of eighteen the school ad- 
vantages "f our subject ceased and since 
then he has been obliged t" teach himself. 
Until his marriage Mr. Ilill remained 
at home, but when he was twen . "ii 

April ,}. [858, he married Miss Ellen Reese, 
wlii 1 was 1 1« irn in Wales in [829. 1 ler parents, 
Morgan and Esther Reese, came to Amer- 
ica, landing in Xew York City, and settled 
in Whitesboro, Xew York. In 1855 Miss 
Kee^e came to Clinton to visit her 
hri >tlier. who was the pastor of the 
I'.aptist church of that city, and in 
this way she bcame acquainted with 
Mr. Ilill. and they were married as above 
stated. They began their married life upon 
land given by Mr. Hill's father out of his 
original -rant, consisting of one hundred 
acres, part of which was timber. At 
time of the father's death our subject pur- 
chased fifty-seven acres more. When he 
first obtained his land there was no house 
upon the property, hut he built a frame 
structure. Later he moved this one quarter 
i<\ a mile further north and in [899 he re- 
built his residence and today lias a pleasant 
story and a half house, thirty by forty feet 
in dimensions, surrounded by tine shade 
trees. There is an excellent barn and orch- 
ard on the farm and all the land is well cul- 



tivated and devoted to general farming, 
sti 'ck and grain-raising. 

Mie wife of our subject died on April 
17, [899, and, was interred in Woodlawn 
cemetery in Clinton, Illinois. To Mr. and 
Mrs. Hill were born fi ur children, one girl 
and three boys, namely: Esther Ann. who 
nber 23, i<)<«>. aged FortA eighl 
years, and. was interred in Woodlawn ceme- 
tery, Clinton; Joseph, now deceased, who 
married Ellen Swam, who keeps house for 
our subject and has one child, Nellie; Will- 
iam M.. who married Amelia (oats and re 
-ides in Nebraska, where he operates a line 
far mof one hundred and sixty acres, and 
he has three children. Neva, Ethel and Jes 
sie; and Frederick C, who married Miss 
Mabel llulett and who is an attorney-at- 
law of Clinton. 

After 'he death of his wife Mr. Hill 
moved to Clinton and purchased a tine house 
and -rounds 011 West Van Buren street, 
where he makes his home. lie now rents 
'■is farm and lives a somewhat retired life. 
In politics he is a strong Republican ami has 
served a.s school trustee one term and school 
director for twentv years. In religion he 
is a most earnest member of ami deacon in 
in the Baptist church and in this denomina- 
tion Mrs. Hill also held membership. Mr. 
Hill is a man who finds his greatest 
joyment in the companionship of his fam- 

and friends, and having devoted so 
many years of his life to hard work, he can 
now rest upon the results of his labors, feel- 
ing well content with himself in that he was 
able to bring s, , much out of little. 



TIlo.M \S SPENCER. 

The agricultural interests of Illinois are 
well represented all over the state hut per- 
haps nowhere better than in DeWitl county. 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



409 



where there arc gathered together in each 
township men of substance and experi< 
who understand farming in all it- branches 
and who are ever) day putting to practical 
test the knowledge gained during year- of 
hard work. Among the representative farm- 
one of the most prominent is Thomas 
Spencer, of Texas township .\h" was born 
here, February 9, 1858, and educated in the 
district SChi 

He 1- a s, ,n of Littleberry and Lucinda 
(Blair) Spencer. The father was a native 
of Kentucky and came to DeWitt county, 
Illinois, when he was only three years of 
His parents settled in DeWitt county 
and engaged in farming in Clintonia town- 
ship. They died here, the grandfather at 
the age of seventy-nine, while the grand- 
niotlier was ninety-six at the time of her 
death. The lather of our subject was one 
of eleven children, seven of whom grew t" 
maturity and four are now living, two "i" 
whom reside in DeWitt county. These liv- 
ing are as follows: Levi, who lives in the 
southern part of Texas township and is the 
youngest of the family: John, who lives in 
Clintnoia township, and is engaged in farm- 
ing: James D., who live- in Indian Terri- 
tory: Mildred, who married Henry Webb 
and they reside in Wayne county. 

Littleberry Spencer, the father of our 
subject, engaged in general farming ami 
stock-raising and in the ea ly part of his 
business career worked at brick making in 
Texas township. His farm was on section 
10. Texas township, and .although a small 
one was well cultivated. In politic- he ' 
a -tanch Republican, and he was also a de- 
vout member of the christian church. His 
death took place at his home in Texas town- 
ship, January 1. 1900, and he is buried at 
Woodlawn cemetery. He was a public-spir- 
ited man and earnestly advocated all im- 



provements tending towards the adv.i 
ment of the township. Hi- widow survive 
eighty-one year- of age, and resides in Tun- 
bridge town-hip. Their children w< 
Thomas, our subject; Alexander, deceased; 
Allien, who resides in 1 vnship on a 

farm on section 10. and he married M. Anna 
McElroy, and they have six children; Frank, 
who resides in Clinton and is married and 
has a family. 

The father. Littleberry Spencer, enlisted 
in [862, in com